89 episodes

Aphasia Access Conversations brings you the latest aphasia resources, tips and a-ha moments from Life Participation professionals who deliver way more than stroke and aphasia facts. Topics include: aphasia group treatment ideas, communication access strategies, plus ways for growing awareness and funds for your group aphasia therapy program. ​This podcast is produced by Aphasia Access.

Aphasia Access Conversations Aphasia Access

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.7 • 19 Ratings

Aphasia Access Conversations brings you the latest aphasia resources, tips and a-ha moments from Life Participation professionals who deliver way more than stroke and aphasia facts. Topics include: aphasia group treatment ideas, communication access strategies, plus ways for growing awareness and funds for your group aphasia therapy program. ​This podcast is produced by Aphasia Access.

    Episode #88: Everyone’s an Expert: Person-Centeredness in the Clinic and Research -- A Conversation with Jackie Hinckley

    Episode #88: Everyone’s an Expert: Person-Centeredness in the Clinic and Research -- A Conversation with Jackie Hinckley

    During this episode, Dr. Katie Strong, Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Director of the Strong Story Lab at Central Michigan University talks with Dr. Jackie Hinckley from Nova Southeastern University about stakeholder engaged research and Project BRIDGE.

     
    Dr. Jackie Hinckley is Professor and Director of the Undergraduate Program at Nova Southeastern University. She is Board Certified in Neurogenic Communication Disorders by the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences (ANCDS) and Fellow in Person-Centered Care. Dr. Hinckley is currently a Board Member of Aphasia Access and the National Aphasia Association. She is Executive Director Emeritus of Voices of Hope for Aphasia. She is Project Lead for Project BRIDGE, formerly funded by two PCORI Engagement Awards and now supported by NSU. She is the author of two books, Narrative-Based Practice in Speech-Language Pathology, and What Is It Like to Have a Communication Impairment?  Simulations for Family, Friends, and Caregivers. She is an Editor for The Qualitative Report, and on the Editorial Board of Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation and Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders. 
     
     
     
    In this episode you will: 
    Learn about the importance of including people with aphasia and clinicians in the research process to make the research better. Find out what stakeholder engaged research is and its importance in developing relevant evidence for clinical practice Hear how Project BRIDGE has enhanced stakeholder engagement in research related to aphasia. Be empowered to embrace your own expertise and the expertise of your clients and their family members. KS: Jackie, Welcome back to the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. I believe you were first interviewed on our podcast in 2016 – Episode #2! We now have over 86 episodes that are available! Who knew the series would have such staying power. It’s really amazing! Thanks for joining me today. I’m really excited about this conversation with you and having our listeners hear about what you’ve been up to lately and how that is impacting our clinical practice and the people with aphasia that we work with.
    JH: Well, thank you, Katie, for the introduction, and thank you to you and Aphasia Access for the opportunity to be on this podcast. I'm really excited to talk about these issues and talk about them with you.
    KS: Well, let's dig in. So, today's topic is “everyone's an expert”. How does that relate to our clinical work and our research? 
    JH: Well, you know, Carl Rogers, the famous psychologist said that we are the best experts on ourselves. And I think that we all have that thought in our minds, but it really hits at the core of person-centeredness. An expert is someone with authoritative knowledge. So that has two parts, the authority and the knowledge. And an expert comes about when people agree that an individual has high performance or high knowledge in an area. I think that the idea of person-centered care in our clinical work is that we acknowledge that our clients are the best experts on themselves. And I think most of us who are practicing speech pathologists would certainly acknowledge that and agree with that. But in reality, in a normal clinical process, it's actually kind of hard to do. Because the clinician is, by definition, an expert, and has a certain degree of authority in the clinical interaction. So, for example, clinicians need to do an assessment and a diagnosis. And the client really can't self-diagnose, so there's an issue of authority and knowledge from the point of view of the clinician. But now that authority tends to seep into other areas like goal setting, where really the client needs to bring forward their own expertise about themselves. When we continue to exercise authority over what the goal should be,  and yet, evidence shows that collaborative goal setting like goal attainment scaling sig

    • 35 min
    Episode #87: Tailored LPA interventions for dementias: A Conversation with Becky Khayum

    Episode #87: Tailored LPA interventions for dementias: A Conversation with Becky Khayum

    Welcome to the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. I’m Jerry Hoepner, a faculty member in the department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire. Today, I’m joined by Becky Khayum. 
    Biosketch:
    Becky is a speech-language pathologist and specializes in providing person-centered care for people living with different dementia syndromes. Over the past 15 years, she has held leadership positions in rehabilitation centers, assisted living communities, memory care communities and home health environments. In 2009, Becky co-founded MemoryCare Corporation, a therapy company specializing in providing care for families coping with dementia. Becky currently serves as the President of MemoryCare. In 2020, she co-founded Cognitive Concierge, which provides digital services and programs for people living with cognitive challenges. She has been involved in research initiatives in Primary Progressive Aphasia at the Northwestern Mesulam Center for Cognitive Neurology & Alzheimer’s Disease. Becky speaks nationally to train healthcare providers and families on how to creatively apply the life participation approach for people living with dementia.

    Take aways:
    Learn about applications of the LPAA framework to individuals with dementias, including primary progressive aphasia (PPA).  Learn about tools you can use to implement LPAA interventions with individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and PPA.  Learn about several key authors/researchers/clinicians in the areas of dementia interventions that should serve as starting points for learning about person-centered care in dementias.  Learn how to frame person-centered, LPAA goals for persons with dementias, including PPA.  Learn how to document so that LPAA interventions are reimbursable for Medicare and other insurance providers.  Interview Transcript: 
    Jerry Hoepner: Hi Becky so glad to have you with me today and really looking forward to this conversation.
    Becky Khayum: Well, thanks for having me Jerry I’m looking forward as well to our discussion.
    Jerry Hoepner: You know, I was mentioning to our listeners that if they weren't familiar with your work, they really need to explore your work, because there's just so many important connections about the life participation approach applied to individuals with progressive diseases like dementias and so forth. We know that, at least in the Aphasia Access circles you're well known for your person-centered life participation approach for individuals with dementia, including the individuals with primary progressive aphasia. Can you share just a little bit about how you got connected with Aphasia Access and the life participation approach?
    Becky Khayum: So, so I’m sure others have the same story, but I was going about my ordinary day and I get a call from Audrey Holland and she's so excited and says there is this summit, and you have to go and begins to tell me all about it, and you know, of course, said Aphasia Access you know this is new and I had you know, the summit is new and I had actually hadn't heard of Aphasia Access at that point, which was surprising considering I tried to you know base my clinical work on person centered care and I was so sad because I actually couldn't make of the first [Aphasia Access Leadership] Summit but of course, I went to the Aphasia Access website at that point and signed up, and it was startling and I was so delighted because, “Oh, my goodness, everything that I am trying to think about as the clinician and train other you know speech language pathologist on is completely captured and this one group with so many leaders in our field,” so that is how I first got connected.
    Jerry Hoepner: Oh that's fantastic I didn't know that story but I kind of figured that was one of the connections, I know that I had spoken to Audrey I don't know if it was that the first or the second Aphasia Access Leadership Summit and she just spoke so she raved about

    • 44 min
    Making Aphasia Groups Work: A Conversation with Kathryn Pettigrove

    Making Aphasia Groups Work: A Conversation with Kathryn Pettigrove

    Meet Our Newest Interviewer!
    Lyssa Rome is a speech-language pathologist in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is on staff at the Aphasia Center of California, where she facilitates groups. She owns an LPAA-focused private practice and specializes in working with people with aphasia, dysarthria, and other neurogenic communication impairments. She has worked in acute hospital, skilled nursing, and continuum of care settings. Prior to becoming an SLP, Lyssa was a public radio journalist, editor, and podcast producer
    Guest bio 
    Kathryn Pettigrove is a speech pathologist passionate about supporting wellbeing and connection for people with aphasia and their loved ones. She has worked in acute stroke wards and in- and outpatient hospital rehabilitation, but most loves engaging with people with aphasia in community settings, and is a particular advocate of community aphasia groups. Kathryn is a PhD candidate with the Aphasia Centre of Research Excellence (Aphasia CRE) at La Trobe University in Australia where her research focuses on aphasia groups and their facilitation. She also works as a clinical educator at the University of Sydney and serves on the Board of the Australian Aphasia Association. Her other loves include coffee, hiking, and singing with her a cappella choir.
         
    Listener Take-aways
    In today’s episode you will:
    Identify different models for community aphasia group facilitation. Learn about the skills required to successfully facilitate aphasia groups. Understand the range of roles speech-language pathologists can play within community aphasia groups.   
    Edited show notes
    Lyssa Rome
    Welcome to the Aphasia Access Aphasia Conversations Podcast. I'm Lyssa Rome. I'm a speech language pathologist on staff at the Aphasia Center of California and in private practice. I'm also a member of the Aphasia Access podcast working group. Aphasia Access strives to provide members with information, inspiration, and ideas that support their aphasia care through a variety of educational materials and resources.
    I'm today's host for an episode that features Kathryn Pettigrove. Kathryn is a PhD candidate with the Aphasia Center of Research Excellence at La Trobe University in Australia, where her research focuses on aphasia groups and their facilitation. She also works as a clinical educator at the University of Sydney and serves on the board of the Australian Aphasia Association. Welcome, Kathryn, and thank you for talking with me.
     
    Kathryn Pettigrove 
    Thanks, Lyssa. I'm really happy to be here.
     
    Lyssa Rome
    So what motivated you to explore aphasia groups as part of your clinical practice?
     
    Kathryn Pettigrove
    It's a bit of a story, I guess. I had been working in inpatient, acute and rehabilitation wards for the first four and a half years or so as a speech pathologist. And in those contexts, I worked pretty exclusively, almost exclusively, in impairment therapy in one-on-one settings. And it was great work, I really loved it, it was really important work. But I just really often had this feeling that I wasn't able to do nearly as much as I wanted to for people with aphasia before they were discharged back home and back to the community. And I think that's a common experience actually, that people have. 
    So I decided that I wanted to shift out of hospital settings for a while and see if I could pursue some other paths that would give me opportunities to work more closely with people with aphasia. One of the first roles that I took on after that was working as a speech pathologist for the Aphasia COMPARE trial that was happening in Australia at the time, led by Miranda Rose and her team. These trials involved delivering aphasia therapy, intensive aphasia therapy, over two weeks for people with aphasia in groups of three. I know that on the Aphasia Access podcast, you guys sometimes talk about “aha” moments. The very first day that I showed up for work in the trial, with this group of three women wa

    • 35 min
    Navigating the "Slow Road to Better": A Conversation with Melissa Richman and the Podcast Team from the Stroke Comeback Center

    Navigating the "Slow Road to Better": A Conversation with Melissa Richman and the Podcast Team from the Stroke Comeback Center

    For today’s episode, Ellen Bernstein-Ellis, Program Specialist and Past Director for the Aphasia Treatment Program in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences at Cal State East Bay, speaks with Melissa Richmond and members of the Slow Road To Better (SRTB) podcast group from the Stroke Comeback Center (SCC). This show celebrates Aphasia Awareness Month and is honored to feature 5 individuals with aphasia who are consumer advocates through their work on the Slow Road to Better podcast.
    Guests:

    Melissa Sigwart Richman, MS, CCC-SLP is a speech-language pathologist with 30 years of experience working in rehabilitation with stroke and brain trauma survivors.  She holds degrees from James Madison University and the University of Maryland, College Park.  Her career has included inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation, long-term care, home care, community-based and virtual settings.  Melissa served as a Senior SLP on the inpatient Stroke Recovery Team for Medstar National Rehabilitation Hospital for over ten years and in 2006 became the Program Director for the Stroke Comeback Center in Vienna, Virginia.  During her tenure, the organization grew to three locations starting with a handful of groups to well over 50 classes per week utilizing a life participation approach. In 2019, Melissa moved to the Outer Banks of North Carolina and started the Virtual Stroke Comeback Center which has continued to grow and thrive.  She continues to focus her energy on improving the lives of survivors and families living with aphasia, with the primary focus of helping them get back to the business of living.
     
    Slow Road to Better Podcast Team Members: 
    Kitti Tong: At the age of 27, Kitti Tong earned the CEO’s Exceptional Performance Award at Choice Hotels – the highest recognition in the company. A data analyst, growth strategist, and event facilitator, she founded a Toastmasters Chapter in Maryland and co-chaired several committees for women’s leadership and human rights. Kitti’s life was changed forever when she was struck by a car walking home from work, sustaining a severe traumatic brain injury. With determination and grit, she relearned to walk, talk and participate in life. She has founded S.A.Y. Younger Aphasia on YouTube to help create awareness of this isolating condition.
    Kitti's YouTube channel is: S.A.Y -- Younger Aphasia Group - YouTube
    Pat Horan: My name is Pat Horan, I was a Captain in the Army. In 2007 I was wounded in combat serving in Iraq. After my injury I couldn't talk, read or write. Over the past 10 years the Stroke Comeback Center has helped me improve my writing, reading and speech more than I could have ever thought possible. Today I am a proud father of a new son and an adopted nephew. My continued recovery will help me be a better father and husband. 
    Erin Adelekum: Erin's Instagram is: stroke.mama
    Chris Vincent
    Dante Thomas
    Listener Take-aways
    In today’s episode you will:
    Learn how interprofessional education with physical therapists led to the launch of this member-focused aphasia podcast. Find out how the members prepare for the podcast by embracing spontaneous conversation Listen to members share insights on the benefits of being part of the SRTB podcast Hear the podcast team share the insight that even though aphasia is not “leaving it, but we’d like to crush it a little bit.” Crush it, they do!
     
     
     
    Edited show notes
    Ellen Bernstein-Ellis  00:54
    Welcome to the Aphasia Access Aphasia Conversations Podcast. I'm Ellen Bernstein Ellis, Program Specialist with the Aphasia Treatment Program at Cal State East Bay in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences and a member of the Aphasia access podcast Working Group. Aphasia Access strives to provide members with information, inspiration, and ideas that support their aphasia care through a variety of educational materials and resources. 
    In recognition of June being Aphasia Awareness Mont

    • 38 min
    Episode #84: Interprofessional Practice and Interprofessional Education: In Conversation with Mary Purdy

    Episode #84: Interprofessional Practice and Interprofessional Education: In Conversation with Mary Purdy

    During this episode, Dr. Janet Patterson, Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Northern California Healthcare System, speaks with Dr. Mary Purdy about aphasia rehabilitation, Interprofessional Practice (IPP) and Interprofessional Education (IPE). 

     
    In today’s episode, you will:
     
    Learn how IPP and IPE are related, in concept and practice. Hear about the similarities and differences in IPP in inpatient settings and outpatient settings. Listen to ideas on delivering client-centered treatment in an atmosphere of IPP.  
    Interview Transcript:
    Janet Patterson: Welcome to this edition of Aphasia Access Podversations, a series of conversations about community aphasia programs that follow the LPAA model. My name is Janet Patterson, and I am a Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Northern California Healthcare System in Martinez, California. Today I am delighted to be speaking with my colleague and friend, Mary Purdy, about Interprofessional Education, or IPE, and Interprofessional Practice, or IPP. Dr. Purdy is Professor and Graduate Program Coordinator in the Department of Communication Disorders at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, Connecticut, and a speech- language pathologist at Hartford Health Care Rehabilitation Network. Mary has been involved with educating graduate students in the principles and practices of IPE for several years and is currently Chair of Southern Connecticut State University's College of Health and Human Services IPE committee. Additionally, she actively engages in Interprofessional Practice in the outpatient setting. 
    As Mary and I start this podcast, I want to give you a quick reminder that this year we are again sharing episodes that highlight at least one of the ten gap areas in aphasia care identified in the Aphasia Access White Paper authored by Dr. Nina Simmons-Mackie. For more information on this White Paper, check out Podversation Episode #62 with Dr. Liz Hoover as she describes these gap areas, or go to the Aphasia Access website. 
    This episode with Dr. Purdy focuses on gap area five, attention to life participation across the continuum of care, and gap area six, training and protocols or guidelines to aid implementation of participation-oriented intervention across the continuum of care. We focus on these areas through our discussions of IPE and IPP. Two previous Aphasia Access podcasts included conversations about IPE, Episode #7 with Darla Hagge and Episode #78 with Michelle Gravier, Albert Mendoza and Jennifer Sherwood. For so many reasons, IPE and IPP are crucial in creating and sustaining high quality aphasia rehabilitation programs. I hope our conversation today adds to the growing body of knowledge in IPP and IPE. With that introduction, I would like to welcome Dr. Mary Purdy to Aphasia Access conversations. Thank you, Mary for joining me today to discuss aphasia rehabilitation, IPP and IPE. 
    Mary Purdy: Well, thanks Janet. And thank you. It’s really good to be here. 
    Janet: Let me just jump right in then Mary to say we've heard a lot about Interprofessional Education, or IPE, and Interprofessional Practice, or IPP. How do you define and think about these two related, but different concepts, both in general, and as they apply to aphasia rehabilitation? 
    Mary: Well, in general, when we think about IPP, the whole concept of collaboration, we know, leads to improved health care outcomes, and that's what we're all after, with our people with aphasia. In terms of the education students need, to learn how to collaborate with other professionals, and this can be quite complex. First of all, they need to understand what their own roles and responsibilities are, just related to their profession. Plus, they have to learn to work as a member of a team, and not just operate on their own, solo. In order to have students become comfortable in these roles, we have to provide them with opportunities to learn, and those opportunities, I th

    • 36 min
    Episode #83: In Conversation with a Robin Tavistock Award Recipient: Audrey Holland "As common as dirt... but not really."

    Episode #83: In Conversation with a Robin Tavistock Award Recipient: Audrey Holland "As common as dirt... but not really."

    During this episode, Jerry Hoepner, a faculty member in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, speaks with Dr. Audrey Holland about receiving the 2022 Robin Tavistock Award. 
     
    In today’s episode, you will:
    Learn about Audrey’s recognition as the Robin Tavistock Scholar for her lifetime of achievements.  Learn about Audrey’s humble beginnings and how she moved out of the Skinner box and into functional communication.  Learn about Audrey’s philosophy on mentorship and being a mentor to the masses.  Audrey shares advice to the next generation of LPAA practitioners.  Find out if Audrey is truly “as common as dirt.”   
    Interview Transcript: 
     
    Jerry Hoepner: Welcome to the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast I’m Jerry Hoepner, a faculty member in the department of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire. Today I’m joined by Dr. Audrey Holland, the 2022 recipient of the Robin Tavistock Award. Although I feel as though no introduction is necessary, nor would that completely reflect the lifetime of work by Audrey, it is my distinguished privilege to introduce today's podcast guest. For over 60 years and she started when she was roughly 5, Audrey has been a leader in moving aphasia care towards holistic participation-based interventions that ultimately improve the quality of life for people with aphasia and their families. From her work on functional communication to aphasia bank to co-founding Aphasia Access, she has made remarkable impacts on so many of us. Her work on coaching and counseling has influenced the speaker. Her work on coaching and counseling has influenced the field of speech language pathology even more broadly without further ado, it is my distinct privilege to introduce Dr. Audrey Holland. 
     
    Jerry Hoepner:  Well, again so good to see you today Audrey. It's always nice to connect with you and have a conversation.
     
    Audrey Holland: Yeah, I just wish there were more opportunities, and I think this has been a very sparsely here for the kind of things that really make a difference for a lot of us, which is that last meeting seems so long ago and the last one for me was the one I had in Baltimore and whoa.
     
    Jerry Hoepner: Yeah it seems like-
     
    Audrey Holland: Centuries.
     
    Jerry Hoepner: Yeah it seems like a long time since we've all gotten to be face to face, since all of this pandemic stuff has gone around yeah that's for sure. Really looking forward to getting back to seeing people, and you know, giving hugs and all of those things again yeah for sure yeah definitely.
     
    Audrey Holland: I mean that's as much the meeting as the meeting.
     
    Jerry Hoepner: Yeah absolutely. I agree, there's, you know, there's good things about connecting virtually but it doesn't quite feel the same as when you're in this. Yeah for sure. So hopefully by the time the next of Aphasia Access Summit comes around we'll be able to meet in person and I know we have a lot of new friends and old friends that we’ll be able to reconnect with at that time, too, oh.
     
    Audrey Holland: Yeah that's going to be pretty fast. I think that's going to be faster than right now. I can visualize.
     
    Jerry Hoepner: I hope so yeah, I hope that's the case that we can, yeah like you said, get back into rubbing shoulders with each other again. Yeah it was like we're getting can see the end of the tunnel. I hope- I should knock on wood when I say that. But it seems like getting there. Yeah well Audrey it's my pleasure to have a conversation with you today about your recent award the Robin Tavistock Award. Would you be willing to talk a little bit about what that means to you?
     
    Audrey Holland: Oh yes, I’m very, very, very, very honored by that. I believe I’m not sure of them, I meant to open up this morning and I didn't. I believe it's been in existence for more than 15 years, but this is only t

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
19 Ratings

19 Ratings

rleen4 ,

Excellent conversation

Greatly appreciate hearing Dr Azios contextual her work. Fantastic insights.

You Might Also Like

Theresa Richard
Leigh Ann Porter, MA, CCC-SLP
Stroke Comeback Center
Hidden Brain
Dear Media, Aliza Pressman
JLML Press