100 episodes

The ASCO Daily News Podcast features oncologists discussing the latest research and therapies in their areas of expertise.

ASCO Daily News American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)

    • Science
    • 4.6 • 41 Ratings

The ASCO Daily News Podcast features oncologists discussing the latest research and therapies in their areas of expertise.

    How Primary Tumor Sidedness Impacts Treatment and Other Advances in Colorectal Cancer

    How Primary Tumor Sidedness Impacts Treatment and Other Advances in Colorectal Cancer

    Gastrointestinal cancer experts Dr. Aparna Parikh and Dr. Kristin Ciombor discuss the treatment implications of the phase 3 PARADIGM trial and other advances in colorectal cancer with guest host and ASCO Daily News Associate Editor, Dr. Shaalan Beg.
     
    TRANSCRIPT
    Dr. Shaalan Beg: Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast. I'm Dr. Shaalan Beg, your guest host of the ASCO Daily News Podcast today. I'm an adjunct associate professor at UT Southwestern's Simmons Comprehensive Center and vice president of Oncology at Science 37. I'm delighted to welcome Dr. Aparna Parikh, and Dr. Kristen Ciombor to the podcast today.
    Dr. Parikh is an assistant professor of Medicine at Harvard University and a GI medical oncologist at the Mass General Hospital Cancer Center. Dr. Ciombor is an associate professor of Medicine and GI medical oncologist at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center.
    Today, we'll be discussing exciting new approaches using EGFR inhibitors as frontline therapy in colorectal cancer, and promising advances with immune therapy in the treatment of rectal cancer. Our full disclosures are available in the show notes, and disclosures of all guests on the podcast can be found in our transcripts at: asco.org/podcasts. Dr. Parikh, and Dr. Ciombor, it's great to have you on the podcast today.
    Dr. Aparna Parikh: Thanks so much.
    Dr. Kristen Ciombor: Thanks so much for having us.
    Dr. Shaalan Beg: We've seen some exciting advances in GI oncology this year. Let's start with colorectal cancer. Dr. Parikh, there have been many trials looking to compare EGFR and VEGF inhibitors in colorectal cancer. We've heard about the IDEA studies, the FIRE trials, and CALGB 80405. At the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting, we heard the results of the PARADIGM trial. Have we finally answered the question of when to use EGFR inhibitors as frontline therapy for colorectal cancer?
    Dr. Aparna Parikh: Thanks so much, Dr. Beg, for this great question. It has been a really exciting year for colorectal cancer across the board. So, the anti-EGFR story is really interesting and has evolved. And maybe just for a little bit of background, we know that colorectal cancer originating from both the right and left side of the colon differ. So, they differ embryologically, and epidemiologically; there are different genetic and molecular aspects to right and left sides of colon cancers. And we have learned over time that in the era of targeted therapy, the primary tumor location has been found to play a very important role, not only in the prognosis of patients but to predict treatment response.
    We know that patients that have left-sided colon cancers-- and when we think about left-sided colon cancers, we think about cancers that originate from the splenic flexure and descending colon, sigmoid colon, rectosigmoid junction, and sometimes include the rectum in this as well. The rectals have slightly different molecular features than distal colons.
    And we know that these left-sided patients, overall, have better survival benefits than patients that have right-sided CRC. And that includes again, cecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, and transverse colon. So, we know that that had prognostic implications, but what about the predictive implications?
    And with ASCO, we saw some really exciting data with the PARADIGM study, as Dr. Beg highlighted. We have seen many examples in the past showing the predictive power of anti-EGFR therapy, and anti-EGFR therapy showing a detriment for patients on the right side of the colon. But all these results historically have been obtained by retrospective analysis.
    So, retrospective analysis of the pivotal CALGB 80405 study, which is the first-line biologic trial. FIRE-3, which is a similar study, but done out of Europe, and KRYSTAL. So all these studies show the same finding but were all obtained basically by retrospective analysis.
    And what we saw with PARADIGM this year, which is exciting to see, is that this was the first pro

    • 18 min
    Update from Poland: Cancer Care for Ukrainian Refugees

    Update from Poland: Cancer Care for Ukrainian Refugees

    Professor Piotr Rutkowski, of the Maria-Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute, discusses how Poland is managing the influx of 5 million Ukrainian refugees since the war began and tells host Dr. John Sweetenham, of the UT Southwestern Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, about the future health needs of Ukrainian refugees with cancer.
    TRANSCRIPT 
    Dr. John Sweetenham: Hello. I’m Dr. John Sweetenham, the associate director for Clinical Affairs at UT Southwestern's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and host of the ASCO Daily News podcast. My guest today is Professor Piotr Rutkowski, who leads the department of Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma and Melanoma at the Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology in Warsaw, Poland. Prof. Rutkowski is also the deputy director for the National Oncological Strategy and Clinical Trials, and serves as president of the Polish Oncological Society. Prof. Rutkowski spoke with us earlier this year as millions of people were fleeing the war in Ukraine, and he described the really remarkable response from both the Polish government and his institution to this crisis.
    He's back on the podcast today to tell us about cancer care for Ukrainian refugees 5 months into the conflict, and how health systems are coping with the influx of millions of refugees. He will also share his insights on the kind of support that will be needed long-term to care for these patients in the future.
    Our full disclosures are available in the show notes and disclosures relating to all guests on the podcast can be found on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts.
    Professor Rutkowski, thank you for being on the podcast today. It's been about 4 months since we last spoke. How are you doing?
    Dr. Piotr Rutkowski: I'm very privileged that we can speak again. I'm talking probably on behalf of many Polish physicians and citizens involved with this dramatic situation of war in Ukraine and helping our patients and citizens from Ukraine. And I feel okay, but of course, the situation is still dramatic, and we don't know what will happen during the next months. What we can tell, first, is what has been changed for these last 4 months, it is the number. So as of now, almost 5 million people from Ukraine crossed the border between Ukraine and Poland. And we can estimate that about 3 million refugees stay temporary or maybe even permanently in our country. This is a completely new situation because it means that it's about 10% of our citizens now.
    And what didn't change but still the cancer care for Ukrainian patients is the extension of regular cancer care within our national oncology network and our national health fund with this Polish insurance system. And this is the same for patients in Poland. And so all refugees from Ukraine are entitled to receive the same care as citizens of Poland.
    Still, this extraordinary legislation, which was adopted by the Polish parliament, covers all the refugees of war, social security, and health insurance. And we have a better situation because all comprehensive cancer centers or major cancer centers organize the help with a hotline, not only on the level of the whole country but also on the center level in the Ukrainian language. And the majority of these centers have staff speaking the Ukrainian language.
    Moreover, what I can say as a president of Polish Oncological Society, recently, with the help of an educational grant, we bought electronic translators for major oncological cancer centers. So they can help in the situation, like in the emergency situation, when we have access to live talk. So they can be used in that situation. And in my opinion, it is very, very helpful. So this is the current situation. And of course, I will present further the structure of oncological patients from Ukraine in Poland now and what's been done.
    Dr. John Sweetenham: Thank you. It's really quite extraordinary to grasp that your patient population almost overnigh

    • 20 min
    A Novel Approach to Address Financial Toxicity

    A Novel Approach to Address Financial Toxicity

    Host Dr. John Sweetenham, of the UT Southwestern’s Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Dr. Bridgette Thom, of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discuss a novel intervention to address financial toxicity and social need using the Electronic Medical Record.
     
    TRANSCRIPT
    Dr. John Sweetenham: Hello. I’m Dr. John Sweetenham, the associate director for clinical affairs at UT Southwestern Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and host of the ASCO Daily News podcast. My guest today is Dr. Bridgette Thom, a researcher at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) Cancer Center. We’ll be discussing a novel approach to address financial toxicity that uses the electronic medical record to streamline referrals to financial assistance and counseling for high-risk patients.
    Our full disclosures are available in the show notes, and disclosures of all guests on the podcast can be found on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts.
    Dr. Thom, it’s great to have you on the podcast today.
    Dr. Bridgette Thom: Thanks so much for having me.
    Dr. John Sweetenham: Dr. Thom, the high costs of cancer care have caused major financial distress for many patients and their families. And this, of course, has been the subject of a great deal of literature in recent years. As you noted in your poster presentation at the recent ASCO Annual Meeting, there are limited interventions, despite a need for patient level and system-based solutions (Abstract 6596). Listeners to our podcast will remember a previous discussion that we had with Dr. Derek Raghavan from the Levine Cancer Institute, where they had instituted financial toxicity grand rounds to partially address this problem. Can you tell us about the novel approach that you and your colleagues explored using the electronic medical record to streamline referrals for financial assistance and counseling?
    Dr. Bridgette Thom: I first have to credit our team for this work. Dr. Emeline Aviki, who is a gynecological surgical oncologist with keen interest in affordability and payment models, founded the MSK affordability working group several years ago. The first priority of the group was to determine the scope of financial hardship at our institution. At the time, we were absent a systematic screening process. So she, our data analysts, and representatives from our Patient Financial Services Program, developed proxy measures to figure out which patients might be having financial issues.
    Looking through the medical record, we found those patients who had used one of our Patient Financial Services assistance programs, those who had billing issues, and those who had been referred specifically to social work for a financial issue. And in doing so, we found out that about 25% of our patients over a 2-year period were facing some sort of financial issue. Looking closer at that data, patients experiencing financial hardship weren’t necessarily being connected to the resources that we had available, which include copay assistance programs, financial assistance programs, and support for non-medical essential needs. So, for example, we had about 1 in 6 patients who had some sort of payment issue, but only about 20% of them had applied for financial assistance. And we wanted to figure out why this was happening and review the process.
    In doing so, we discovered that too much burden was being placed on already burdened social workers who had to triage all those issues. So Dr. Aviki in her wisdom realized that care providers, physicians, advanced practice providers (APP), nurses needed to make direct referrals to the resources that we had. So we had a place for patients to go, we just needed an easier mechanism for them to get there. And that was the birth of the financial toxicity order set. And she and her team really powered through the developmental and testing phases working with IT, our strategy administration groups, clinical end users, our PFS team, that’s Patient Financial Services.

    • 13 min
    Hidden Gems From ASCO22: Abstracts on EDI, Health Care Economics, and More

    Hidden Gems From ASCO22: Abstracts on EDI, Health Care Economics, and More

    Dr. Pamela Kunz, of the Yale Cancer Center, and the JCO consultant editor for Meeting Abstracts, discusses “hidden gems” from ASCO22, highlighting abstracts that address EDI, global health, health care economics, and more.
    Abstracts/Tweetorials @PamelaKunzMD and @ryangentzler
    TRANSCRIPT
    ASCO Daily News: Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Daily News podcast. I’m Geraldine Carroll, a reporter for the ASCO Daily News. My guest today is Dr. Pamela Kunz, an associate professor of medicine and director of the Center for Gastrointestinal Cancers at the Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Kunz is also the Journal of Clinical Oncology’s (JCO) contributing editor for meeting abstracts. You may have seen her recent tweetorials highlighting compelling abstracts from the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting. She’ll be telling us more about this initiative to highlight impactful studies that address equity, diversity, and inclusion, global oncology, and more.
    Dr. Kunz’s full disclosures are available in the show notes and disclosures relating to all episodes of the podcast can be found on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts.
    Dr. Kunz, thanks for being on the podcast today.
    Dr. Pamela Kunz: Thank you. It’s my pleasure to be here.
    ASCO Daily News: Social media has created a global community in oncology, and you and Dr. Ryan Gentzler of the University of Virginia Cancer Center recently launched a great series of tweetorials to highlight compelling studies from the ASCO Annual Meeting. Some of our listeners will have seen these threads already, and others will be keen to find them and know more about these efforts. Can you give us the details?
    Dr. Pamela Kunz: Sure, I’d be happy to. This is a new initiative to really modernize the meeting abstracts. These used to be called meeting proceedings and were printed, and we felt that there was a real opportunity to use social media to disseminate more information around abstracts. And we decided this year to focus on four themes. They are diversity, equity, and inclusion; global health; health care economics; and the Merit Award recipients.
    And within each of these tweetorials, we have 4 to 5 abstracts that are highlighted that include takeaways and a visual from the poster or presentation. We intentionally decided to highlight abstracts that were not otherwise highlighted in the ASCO Annual Meeting in either oral sessions or poster discussions. So we are calling these hidden gems. There are so many great scientific abstracts that don’t get otherwise highlighted, and this was a really nice opportunity to do so.
    ASCO Daily News: Excellent. And I understand you’ll be highlighting a couple of abstracts for us today. I believe the first one concerns telehealth used by older patients. Can you tell us about this abstract?
    Dr. Pamela Kunz: Sure. So this is in the health equity tweetorial, and this is Abstract 1591 by Dr. Higashi and colleagues. And the takeaway from this, I found this interesting, and the disclosure is that I selected these abstracts, given my own personal interests, but I thought that they would be of broad interest to the ASCO membership.
    So telehealth really became used quite often during COVID, and I think that that has been a real silver lining that there is increased access to expert cancer care through the use of telehealth. This abstract demonstrated that the use of telehealth during cancer treatment was really received positively by older patients, providers, and staff. Most older patients, 66%, and providers and staff, 77%, intended to continue using telehealth after the pandemic.
    There are certainly some equity issues related to telehealth in terms of access to the internet and the ability to use the technology, but I thought this was interesting because it’s specifically focused on older patients.
    ASCO Daily News: Excellent. Telehealth certainly has been a gamechanger in oncology. I believe the second abstract that you’ll be highlighting addresses the use of su

    • 8 min
    Novel Therapies in GI Oncology at ASCO22

    Novel Therapies in GI Oncology at ASCO22

    Dr. Rachna Shroff, of the University of Arizona Cancer Center, tells guest host, Dr. Shaalan Beg, of UT Southwestern’s Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and Science 37, about advances in precision medicine for pancreatic cancer featured at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting. She also highlights compelling new data from the FOLFOX, FOENIX-CCA2, and HERB trials in hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and biliary tract cancer.
     
    TRANSCRIPT
    Dr. Shaalan Beg: Hello and welcome to the ASCO Daily News podcast. I'm Dr. Shaalan Beg, your guest host of the ASCO Daily News podcast today. I'm an adjunct associate professor at UT Southwestern Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and vice president of oncology at Science 37.
    I'm delighted to welcome Dr. Rachna Shroff, the associate dean for clinical and translational research and the chief of gastrointestinal (GI) medical oncology at the University of Arizona Cancer Center where she's also the interim chief of Hematology-Oncology.
    Dr. Shroff is also the chair-elect for the Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium. Today we'll be discussing key abstracts in GI cancer that were featured at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting.
    Our full disclosures are available in the show notes and disclosures of all our guests on the podcast can be found on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts.
    Dr. Shroff, thank you for being on the podcast today.
    Dr. Rachna Shroff: Thank you so much for having me.
    Dr. Shaalan Beg: Let's begin by reviewing what is new in the realm of precision medicine in GI cancers. One of the diseases where precision medicine has not made adequate inroads is pancreatic cancer. One of the most common mutations in pancreas cancer is KRAS, but there haven't been a lot of treatments that can target the most common forms of KRAS. What did we hear at ASCO22 regarding precision medicine and pancreatic cancer?
    Dr. Rachna Shroff: I agree, I think that the area of precision oncology is, unfortunately, lagging behind a little bit in pancreatic cancer. But I think as we have gotten better and better with our comprehensive genomic profiling, we are identifying subsets of patients within pancreas cancer who are potentially amenable to targeted therapies.
    You already mentioned KRAS mutations, and we obviously have a number of inhibitors in development in that space, though, we are still missing that key G12D mutation that we see in pancreas cancer. But what I think was really interesting that came out of ASCO22, was a lot of interest and emphasis on better understanding the KRAS wild-type patients in pancreatic cancer.
    Now, this is obviously a smaller subset of patients, given that the majority of patients have KRAS mutations. But there was a really interesting abstract, LBA4011, that looked at patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, who were KRAS wild-type. They actually received gemcitabine in combination with a monoclonal antibody targeting EGFR and nimotuzumab.
    This was a study that was done entirely in Asia. It involved 92 Chinese patients that were randomly assigned to receive the combination of nimotuzumab with gemcitabine. What was interesting in this study is that the patients were found in the full analysis set to have a significantly longer median overall survival of 10.9 months versus 8.5 months with a hazard ratio of 0.5.
    So, that of course was intriguing and provocative for sure. Similarly, the other endpoints were also somewhat intriguing in terms of improvements in the median progression-free survival (PFS), etc. And specifically, patients without biliary obstruction had a longer PFS, which was an interesting finding as well.
    The nimotuzumab overall was pretty well tolerated and not any sort of surprising treatment-related adverse events (TRAEs) were noted. And so, this is definitely a drug that, I think, piques our interest in terms of being able to target patients with KRAS wild-type pancreatic cancer.
    I think that questions, however, that re

    • 15 min
    Spotlight on Immunotherapy at ASCO22

    Spotlight on Immunotherapy at ASCO22

    Dr. Diwakar Davar and Dr. Jason Luke, both of the University of Pittsburgh’s Hillman Cancer Center, highlight key advances in early phase therapeutics and immunotherapy that were featured at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting and also address toxicities, including immune checkpoint inhibitor-associated myocarditis.
    TRANSCRIPT
    Dr. Diwakar Davar: Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Daily News Podcast. My name is Dr. Diwakar Davar, and I’m an assistant professor of Medical Oncology, specializing in melanoma and phase 1 therapeutics at the University of Pittsburgh’s Hillman Cancer Center. I am the guest host of today’s podcast. My guest today is Dr. Jason Luke, a colleague and the director of the Cancer Immunotherapeutics Center at the UPMC Hillman Cancer Center here. 

    Today, we’ll be discussing advances in early-phase therapeutics and immunotherapy that were featured at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting.  

    You’ll find our full disclosures in the show notes, and the disclosures of all guests on the podcast are available on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts. 

    Jason, thank you for coming on the podcast today. 

    Dr. Jason Luke: Thanks so much for the invitation. It was a great ASCO, and I hope everyone had a good time. 

    Dr. Diwakar Davar: So, onto our abstracts. So, the first one that we’ll be discussing, and Jason as you know we’ve done this before. We’ll be rapidly transitioning between phase 1 therapeutics, melanoma, and advanced phase 2 and 3 trials, but you know this is something you do very well. So Abstract 2504, it’s a phase 1 trial of TIM-3 inhibitor cobomilab immunotherapy and in combination with PD-1 inhibitors nivolumab and dostarlimab. The AMBER Trial that was presented recently, and in full disclosure, both you and I actually are on this abstract. So, what do you think of this abstract? What do you think of the data that is discussed, and how do we contextualize this in relation to what needs to be done in this space? 

    Dr. Jason Luke: So, I think this is an exciting abstract because it brings forward what may be the next high-priority immune checkpoint to try to target in clinical oncology. To level-set, I think everybody listening will know about PD-1 and CTLA-4 as immune checkpoints. In the last year, we’ve had LAG-3 come forward as now a standard of care element of armamentarium in melanoma, and we look forward to further studies of LAG-3 and other tumor types as we think it should be a good partner where PD-1 is otherwise approved. 

    So here now, we hear about TIM-3, which is another negative regulatory checkpoint on a number of different immune subsets. And in this abstract, the antibody targeting TIM-3 was cobolimab. So, TIM-3 is a very interesting molecule. It has, what you might call, pleiotropic effects in the immune system. So, while in the context of this abstract, it was being targeted as another immune checkpoint on T cells, it’s important to point out that TIM-3 has other regulatory roles in other immune subsets such as myeloid cells and very particularly dendritic cells, and that’s important because it might bring in another element of the innate immune system to try to drive anti-tumor responses. So, it’s an exciting target because it might be able to expand the groups of patients who could benefit from immune checkpoint blockade. 

    So, in this abstract, we see initially the phase 1 data of combining cobolimab, anti-TIM-3 with anti-PD-1 of a couple of different flavors. And what you could take from this abstract is that in the phase 1 setting, the drug was well-tolerated and combined well, and had pharmacokinetic properties that would be consistent with what we’d expect for this kind of a monoclonal antibody. I think we have to marry this abstract, which is really the phase 1 data about safety in pharmacokinetic (PK) to another abstract presented in the melanoma session, which showed an expansion cohort of patients who got cobolimab plus nivolu

    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
41 Ratings

41 Ratings

?.... ,

Love the new host!

Great resource for a more intimate understanding of cancer and the evolving treatments

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