23 episodes

Drug Safety Matters brings you the best stories from the world of pharmacovigilance. Through in-depth interviews with our guests, we cover new research and trends, and explore the most pressing issues in medicines safety today. Produced by Uppsala Monitoring Centre, the WHO Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring.

Drug Safety Matters Uppsala Monitoring Centre

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Drug Safety Matters brings you the best stories from the world of pharmacovigilance. Through in-depth interviews with our guests, we cover new research and trends, and explore the most pressing issues in medicines safety today. Produced by Uppsala Monitoring Centre, the WHO Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring.

    #12 Improving signal detection with vigiGroup – Jim Barrett & Joe Mitchell

    #12 Improving signal detection with vigiGroup – Jim Barrett & Joe Mitchell

    Statistical tools can not only cut through the noise in large pharmacovigilance databases. They can also help identify more clinically meaningful patterns in the data. Uppsala Monitoring Centre’s Jim Barrett and Joe Mitchell explain how vigiGroup, a novel clustering algorithm, can bring value to signal detection.

    Tune in to find out:
    What the limits of traditional disproportionality analysis areHow clustering algorithms can improve current signal detection practicesHow vigiGroup has helped monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines so far
    Want to know more?
    By applying vigiGroup to COVID-19 vaccine reports in VigiBase, our Research team was able to identify a number of potential safety signals. Find out more in this poster or in this presentation. Details on how the vigiGroup method was developed and tested can be found in the original publication in Artificial Intelligence in Medicine.Appendicitis was one of the possible safety signals for the COVID-19 vaccines identified with vigiGroup.For more on signal detection at Uppsala Monitoring Centre, visit the Signal Work section on our website or listen to this interview with Helena Sköld and Annette Rudolph on vaccine pharmacovigilance.
    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn, and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to make medicines safer for patients.

    • 23 min
    #11 Talking about vaccine safety – Anthony Cox & Daniel Salmon

    #11 Talking about vaccine safety – Anthony Cox & Daniel Salmon

    With vaccine hesitancy on the rise and misinformation spreading like wildfire on social media, drug safety specialists may have a hard time knowing how to talk about side effects without affecting people’s trust in vaccinations. Anthony Cox from the University of Birmingham and Daniel Salmon from the Institute for Vaccine Safety share their best advice for balanced and responsible vaccine safety communication.

    Tune in to find out:
    Why we can’t allow bad actors to damage the drive for openness in research and dataWhy we should be open about uncertainty and always frame risks in the context of benefitsHow to prevent public health advocacy from biasing the science of vaccine safety
    Want to know more?

    The COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Handbook is a practical guide for anyone who wishes to improve their vaccine communication and challenge misinformation.

    The CIOMS Guide to Vaccine Safety Communication helps medicine regulators communicate the uncertainties, risks and safety of vaccines.
    The World Health Organization provides resources on vaccine communication and a series of illustrated articles on vaccine development and distribution.
    In his Is it Safe? newsletter, Anthony Cox discusses the science, practice, and practicalities of medicine safety – including the latest developments with COVID-19 vaccines.
    For more on vaccines, check out these episodes from the Drug Safety Matters archive:
    Convincing the vaccine hesitantKeeping vaccines safeSubstandard and falsified COVID-19 vaccines in the AmericasVaccination errors risk harm and damage trust
    Finally, we featured these interviews with Anthony Cox and Daniel Salmon as an article in Uppsala Reports, too.

    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn, and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!
    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to make medicines safer for patients.

    • 28 min
    Uppsala Reports Long Reads – The KIDs List

    Uppsala Reports Long Reads – The KIDs List

    It’s not always easy to choose the best medicine for a child. Some drugs are inappropriate for young patients, while others require special consideration or monitoring. For years, clinicians had only historical dogmas, word of mouth and their own experience to guide their choices. But a valuable new resource promises to change paediatric prescribing for the better.

    This episode is part of the Uppsala Reports Long Reads series – the most topical stories from UMC’s pharmacovigilance magazine, brought to you in audio format. Find the original article here.

    After the read, we speak to Rachel Meyers and David Hoff, who co-authored the KIDs List, to learn more about their work and the overall challenges of medicines safety in children.

    Tune in to find out:
    why adverse drug reactions tend to occur more often in the paediatric populationhow the KIDs List can improve prescribing for children how to collect even better safety information on paediatric drugs in the futureWant to know more?

    The KIDs List was first published in The Journal of Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics, where you can find more information on how the list was compiled and how it is meant to be used.

    In an earlier commentary for the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Rachel Meyers reflects on the changes she’d like to see in how paediatric drugs are developed.

    In Europe, the conect4children (c4c) project aims to speed up and facilitate high-quality clinical trials in children while ensuring that the voices of young patients and their families are heard.

    Finally, don’t forget to ­subscribe to the monthly Uppsala Reports newsletter for free regular updates from the world of pharmacovigilance.

    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to make medicines safer for patients.

    • 31 min
    Uppsala Reports Long Reads – Convincing the vaccine hesitant

    Uppsala Reports Long Reads – Convincing the vaccine hesitant

    Fuelled by disinformation and an array of other cultural and economic factors, vaccine hesitancy is one of the greatest global health communication challenges of our times. But to craft the empathetic and tailored communication strategies required to boost confidence in vaccines, we first need to understand the difference between anti-vaccination belief and vaccine hesitancy.

    This episode is part of the Uppsala Reports Long Reads series – the most topical stories from UMC’s pharmacovigilance magazine, brought to you in audio format. Find the original article here.

    After the read, we speak to Uppsala Reports editor Gerard Ross about the dangers of polarising the conversation on vaccines, the role of social media, and how it all boils down to trust.

    Tune in to find out:
    why having questions or worries about vaccines is not the same thing as being anti-vaccinationwhy directing appropriate communication at the vaccine hesitant is more effective than attacking the vaccine deniershow cultural sensitivity and emotional intelligence can benefit pro-vaccine communicationWant to know more?
    The World Health Organization provides resources on vaccine communication in general and COVID-19 vaccines in particular.
    The University of Queensland’s online course on Antivaccination and Vaccine Hesitancy is available to people anywhere in the world.

    For more on vaccine safety and confidence, check out these episodes from the Drug Safety Matters archive:
    Keeping vaccines safeSubstandard and falsified COVID-19 vaccines in the AmericasVaccination errors risk harm and damage trustFinally, don’t forget to ­subscribe to the monthly Uppsala Reports newsletter for free regular updates from the world of pharmacovigilance.

    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn, and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to make medicines safer for patients.

    • 34 min
    #10 Tailoring drug therapy to your genes – Qun-Ying Yue

    #10 Tailoring drug therapy to your genes – Qun-Ying Yue

    Genetic variation is one of the reasons people differ in their response to medicines. Understanding that variation can inform more refined choices of drugs and doses – ultimately preventing undesired side effects. Join us as we discuss past, present and future of pharmacogenomics with Uppsala Monitoring Centre’s Qun-Ying Yue.
    Tune in to find out:
    How genetic biomarkers can guide medicine use and dosing recommendationsWhat we need to effectively implement genetic-based prescribing in clinical practiceHow increasing diversity in clinical trials can aid pharmacogenomics research Want to know more?
    Here are a few resources to get you started:
    SWEDEGENE is a Swedish nation-wide DNA sample collection established to facilitate pharmacogenomic studies of serious adverse drug reactions.The African continent, with its genetically diverse populations, is a treasure trove of pharmacogenomics data – as long as African patients are included in drug studies, as we discussed in this Uppsala Reports Long Read episode.As a past member of the European Medicines Agency’s Pharmacogenomics Working Party, Ying contributed to the “Guideline on key aspects for the use of pharmacogenomic methodologies in the pharmacovigilance evaluation of medicinal products”.Ying also chairs ISoP’s Pharmacogenomics Special Interest Group, whose work and objectives have been described in Uppsala Reports and Drug Safety.Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn, and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.
    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!
    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to make medicines safer for patients.

    • 29 min
    #9 Keeping vaccines safe – Helena Sköld & Annette Rudolph

    #9 Keeping vaccines safe – Helena Sköld & Annette Rudolph

    With COVID-19 vaccinations rolling at full speed in many countries, there’s a lot of talk about vaccine safety monitoring. But what exactly does that mean and how should we be interpreting data on side effects? Uppsala Monitoring Centre’s Helena Sköld and Annette Rudolph walk us through the basics of vaccine pharmacovigilance.

    Tune in to find out:
    How suspected side effects are reported and studied around the worldWhy a mere list of reported side effects says little about a vaccine’s safety profileHow a global database like VigiBase can help spot unexpected safety issuesWant to know more?
    Media coverage can greatly affect the rate at which side effects of medicines and vaccines are reported, as shown by this study by the New Zealand Centre for Adverse Reactions Monitoring.
    When talking about side effects of any medicine or vaccine, it’s important not to confuse reporting rates with incidence.
    In its COVID-19 vaccine safety surveillance manual, the World Health Organization (WHO) outlines how countries should prepare for the introduction of COVID-19 vaccines. 
    Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC) has developed guidelines for carrying out pharmacovigilance work during the COVID-19 pandemic and a list of frequently asked questions on suspected side effects of COVID-19 vaccines.
    Among other things, UMC has been supporting members of the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring in their vaccine safety surveillance efforts by improving the VigiLyze and VigiFlow tools.

    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn, and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to make medicines safer for patients.

    • 26 min

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