42 episodes

Drug Safety Matters brings you the best stories from the world of pharmacovigilance. Through in-depth interviews with our guests, we cover new research and trends, and explore the most pressing issues in medicines safety today. Produced by Uppsala Monitoring Centre, the WHO Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring.

Drug Safety Matters Uppsala Monitoring Centre

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Drug Safety Matters brings you the best stories from the world of pharmacovigilance. Through in-depth interviews with our guests, we cover new research and trends, and explore the most pressing issues in medicines safety today. Produced by Uppsala Monitoring Centre, the WHO Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring.

    #27 When drugs damage the liver – Rita Baião

    #27 When drugs damage the liver – Rita Baião

    The liver is the primary site for drug metabolism in the body, but it can be severely damaged by medicines or their toxic compounds. Rita Baião from the North Lisbon University Hospital Center reviews what pharmacovigilance professionals should know about drug-induced liver injury (DILI).

    Tune in to find out:
    Who is most at risk of developing DILIHow to diagnose the condition and control the damageHow to assess case reports of DILIWant to know more?
    This infographic in Nature Reviews nicely summarises the mechanisms, diagnosis, and management of drug-induced liver injury.In this report, the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences provides a global perspective on DILI detection, susceptibility factors, outcomes, and more.In this Drug Safety article, industry representatives outline how to identify, mitigate, and communicate the risk of DILI during drug development. The PRO-EURO DILI NETWORK coordinates research efforts on DILI across Europe and provides a forum to exchange knowledge and training on the topic. Similar initiatives include the Spanish DILI Registry and the Latin American DILI Network.The free online tool LiverTox contains up-to-date information on drug-induced liver injury for medicines and herbal products.To learn more about post-marketing surveillance and clinical care of DILI, check out Uppsala Monitoring Centre’s free online course on the topic.

    For more on the clustering algorithm vigiGroup, revisit this interview with UMC scientists Jim Barrett and Joe Mitchell.
    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on X, LinkedIn, or Facebook and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 28 min
    #26 What's trending in pharmacovigilance? – Angela Caro

    #26 What's trending in pharmacovigilance? – Angela Caro

    What did the drug safety community achieve in 2023 and how will the field develop in 2024? As the year comes to a close, we asked Angela Caro, president of the International Society of Pharmacovigilance (ISoP), to walk us through current and future trends in pharmacovigilance.
    Tune in to find out:
    Why patient engagement is a growing priorityWhat challenges exist in the Latin American regionWhich topics will be in the spotlight next yearWant to know more?
    ISoP is a non-profit society open to anyone with an interest in pharmacovigilance.

    Through 14 chapters and 13 special interest groups, the society works to enhance the safe and proper use of medicines across countries.

    Their latest annual meeting took place in Bali, Indonesia in November 2023, while the next one will take place in Montreal, Canada in October 2024.
     
    To learn more about ISoP’s activities in patient engagement and pharmacogenomics, listen to these episodes from the Drug Safety Matters archive:
    Empowering patients as partnersTailoring drug therapy to your genesJoin the conversation on social media
    Follow us on X, LinkedIn, or Facebook and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 28 min
    #25 A week in the name of medicines safety – part 2

    #25 A week in the name of medicines safety – part 2

    To mark #MedSafetyWeek, which took place from 6–12 November, we’re releasing a special two-part episode on pharmacovigilance communication campaigns. In this second part, we hear from three #MedSafetyWeek veterans – Anne-Cécile Vuillemin from the Ministry of Health in Luxembourg, Ban Al-Shimran from the Iraqi Ministry of Health, and Frieda Shigwedha from the Therapeutic Information and Pharmacovigilance Centre in Namibia – about what makes a successful campaign.
    Tune in to find out:
    Why you should always tailor your communication strategy to your settingHow to deal with the financial, cultural, and logistical challenges of campaign planningWhat to keep in mind if you are new to #MedSafetyWeekWant to know more?
    You can read a summary of this episode on the Uppsala Reports news site.

    To learn more about #MedSafetyWeek, check out the hashtag online and visit the campaign website, where you will also find free social media materials in several languages.

    This is the second of a two-part episode on pharmacovigilance communication campaigns. Listen to the first part here.


    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on X, LinkedIn, or Facebook and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 33 min
    #24 A week in the name of medicines safety – part 1

    #24 A week in the name of medicines safety – part 1

    To mark #MedSafetyWeek, which takes place from 6–12 November, we’re releasing a special two-part episode on pharmacovigilance communication campaigns. In this first part, we speak to Mitul Jadeja from the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency in the UK about under-reporting and how initiatives like #MedSafetyWeek can help draw attention to medicines safety.
    Tune in to find out:
    Why under-reporting plagues all pharmacovigilance systemsWhat regulators can do to encourage people to report side effectsWhy we need reports from both patients and healthcare professionalsWant to know more?
     Here are the studies cited in the episode:
    A BMJ study in 2022 measured the burden and associated cost of adverse drug reactions, polypharmacy and multimorbidity at a hospital in the UK.In 1976, Inman proposed a theoretical model, known as the ‘seven deadly sins’, to explain why healthcare professionals fail to report adverse drug reactions. This recent systematic review in Drug Safety expands on that. The SCOPE Joint Action project aimed to enhance pharmacovigilance in the EU and delivered practical guidance for regulators.The first UK study to compare Yellow Card reports from patients and healthcare professionals was published in 2012.To join the #MedSafetyWeek campaign next week, follow the hashtag online and check out the campaign website for free social media materials.
    Finally, don’t forget to tune in on 13 November for part 2 of this podcast, where we’ll hear from #MedSafetyWeek advocates in Iraq, Luxembourg, and Namibia about their experience with the campaign. Read a preview of the conversation on Uppsala Reports.


    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on X, LinkedIn, or Facebook and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 27 min
    Uppsala Reports Long Reads – The colour of signals

    Uppsala Reports Long Reads – The colour of signals

    Herbal remedies have been used for thousands of years to treat what ails us. Yet why do we still know so little about their potential side effects compared to modern medicines?

    This episode is part of the Uppsala Reports Long Reads series – the most topical stories from UMC’s pharmacovigilance news site, brought to you in audio format. Find the original article here.

    After the read, we speak to author Daniele Sartori to learn more about the challenges in herbal pharmacovigilance.

    Tune in to find out:
    Why the risks of herbals are rarely discussedHow to encourage safety data collection for herbalsHow to improve herbal nomenclature and regulationWant to know more?

    Here are some of the resources cited in the episode:
    Underreporting of adverse reactions to herbal remedies is driven by our attitude towards herbals themselves, but also by a lack of training on herbal medicines in healthcare curricula.It is possible to safely use herbal medicines together with other medicines, but we must keep in mind some critical issues related to their interaction.Simple videos can dramatically increase public awareness of ADR reporting schemes.Kew Gardens’ Medicinal Plant Names Services offers a systematic overview of medicinal plants and their accepted scientific names.The American Botanical Council suggests methods to uncover attempts to adulterate plant extracts.For a comprehensive overview of herbal pharmacovigilance, check out this recent book by Joanne Barnes and colleagues covering advances, challenges, and international perspectives in the field.

    For more on Daniele’s scoping review of signals or the thorny nomenclature of medicinal plants, listen to these episodes from the Drug Safety Matters archive:
     The evidence for signalsNavigating the plant names jungleFinally, don’t forget to ­subscribe to the monthly Uppsala Reports newsletter for free regular updates from the world of pharmacovigilance.
    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on X, LinkedIn, or Facebook and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 33 min
    Uppsala Reports Long Reads – Empowering patients as partners

    Uppsala Reports Long Reads – Empowering patients as partners

    A patient's perspective can ensure safe medical care and lead to new insights that traditional research may overlook. But how do we best harness that perspective to improve patient outcomes?

    This episode is part of the Uppsala Reports Long Reads series – the most topical stories from UMC’s pharmacovigilance news site, brought to you in audio format. Find the original article here.

    After the read, we speak to Manal Younus, who authored the article, to learn more about patient engagement and its benefits for medicines safety.

    Tune in to find out:
    How regulators and healthcare professionals can effectively engage patientsHow patients can get involved in drug safety monitoringWhat the pharmacovigilance community learned from the valproate caseWant to know more?
    In 2022, the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) published a comprehensive report on patient involvement in the development, regulation and safe use of medicines. They also recorded a webinar to summarise the report’s main conclusions.

    The International Society of Pharmacovigilance (ISoP) runs a patient engagement group to advance patient involvement in the safety monitoring of medicines.

    The Valproate toolkit, developed by the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), supports healthcare professionals in advising women of childbearing age about the risks and benefits of valproate therapy.

    PatientsLikeMe is a digital platform where patients can share personal health stories, connect to peers, and learn about different conditions and treatments.

    For more on patient engagement and communication, check out these episodes from the Drug Safety Matters archive:
    Why we should listen to patientsThe challenge of rare diseasesHow to talk about risksFinally, don’t forget to ­subscribe to the monthly Uppsala Reports newsletter for free regular updates from the world of pharmacovigilance.
    Join the conversation on social media
    Follow us on X, LinkedIn, or Facebook and share your thoughts about the show with the hashtag #DrugSafetyMatters.

    Got a story to share?
    We’re always looking for new content and interesting people to interview. If you have a great idea for a show, get in touch!

    About UMC
    Read more about Uppsala Monitoring Centre and how we work to advance medicines safety.

    • 42 min

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