4 episodes

Hormones affect everyone and everything: from our skin, to stress, to sports.

But for most of us, they're still a mystery. Even the way we talk about hormones makes no sense. ("She's hormonal.")

So let's clear some things up. Each week, Rhea Ramjohn is asking scientists, doctors, and experts to break it all down for us.

A new podcast from Clue. Season 1 launches this fall with eight weekly episodes.

Hormonal Clue

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8, 183 Ratings

Hormones affect everyone and everything: from our skin, to stress, to sports.

But for most of us, they're still a mystery. Even the way we talk about hormones makes no sense. ("She's hormonal.")

So let's clear some things up. Each week, Rhea Ramjohn is asking scientists, doctors, and experts to break it all down for us.

A new podcast from Clue. Season 1 launches this fall with eight weekly episodes.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
183 Ratings

183 Ratings

Fetterfry ,

Very interesting!

Interesting and accessible podcast from the makers of the amazing Clue app.

erinbensinger ,

Informative but LGBTQ+ Exclusive

I've used Clue for years and always appreciated its informative, thorough nature. Using it has improved my life a lot with regards to tracking and managing my menstrual symptoms. As a big fan of podcasts, I was excited when I heard that Clue was putting one out.

I think the podcast's topic and interview format are excellent. I really appreciate getting to hear from experts how hormones function, both biologically and socioculturally. One of the things I've always appreciated about the Clue app is how gender-indifferent it is; there's no pink, no "girls and ladies" language, just a simple interface and universally applicable information. So I was really disappointed when I tuned into the second episode and heard the expert being interviewed repeatedly referring to people who have periods exclusively as "women." Trans men and nonbinary/gender non-conforming individuals also menstruate; I figure that the show's host knows this, because she usually uses pretty gender-inclusive language. I was a little disheartened that the guest speaker was not also conscious of this.

I felt the same when the distinction was made between "heterosexual relationships" vs. "lesbian relationships" — as a bisexual person, none of the relationships I have fall in either of those categories, because I'm not "heterosexual" or "lesbian" when I'm in them. The content of the episode was quite informative and interesting, especially since PMS an often ignored and misunderstood topic, but I just couldn't get past the feeling of isolation and exclusion I felt when hearing that terminology used. I really want to like this podcast and keep listening! It would mean a lot to me (and no doubt others in the LGBTQ+ community) if the cast, including its expert interviewees, were more intentional about using inclusive language.

Caseylee93 ,

PMS is real. PMS isn’t real.

This is strictly a review on the episode mentioned above.

Am I the only one that was angered by this? I was feeling PMS symptoms way before I knew there was a name for it. Starting 1-2 weeks before my period begins, I am an eating machine, I cannot stop eating. I will even get up in the middle of the night with hunger pains and eat. Aside from that, usually over a week before, my boobs hurt so bad and I’m more sensitive to pain in general. Ex: stubbing my toe feels like the worst thing ever and I have even cried from such a thing when PMSing. I also suffer from insomnia but also extreme fatigue during this time. I can also ASSURE you I get angry, super angry and it is NOT because of the actual issue itself, I overreact and feel like I cannot control how angry I get. I become mean. These are just some of my pms issues and I kept it private for the first part of my menstruating-life. I did not hear anything about PMS or people blaming these issues on PMS. It became my detector for my period and I thought I was the only one who had this I was not influenced by the culture around me, in my house we never talked about periods, it was not something to talk about. My PMS is definitely caused at least 85% by hormones. I would say 100% but there is definitely some validity to cultural influence or other personal issues occurring in life and clearly Dr is more knowledgeable than me but it just seems like she is just boxing women in, basically stating that it’s not truly hormones and I feel like many women would disagree and it is NOT in our heads. These symptoms are not psychosomatic, at least not for everyone. I mean psychosomatic in terms of societal influence.

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