699 episodes

Christine Hassler provides you with practical tools and spiritual principles to help you overcome whatever obstacles might be holding you back.

Each episode, Christine coaches callers live on the air offering them inspiration and guidance to heal their past, change their present and create what they really want. Topics include: relationships, career, health, transitions, finances, life purpose, spirituality and whatever else callers have questions about.

Christine coaches "regular people" on problems – and opportunities - we all face. It's a show that reminds you that you are not alone, while also teaching things you can implement in your own life.

Over It And On With It Christine Hassler

    • Education
    • 4.9 • 1.5K Ratings

Christine Hassler provides you with practical tools and spiritual principles to help you overcome whatever obstacles might be holding you back.

Each episode, Christine coaches callers live on the air offering them inspiration and guidance to heal their past, change their present and create what they really want. Topics include: relationships, career, health, transitions, finances, life purpose, spirituality and whatever else callers have questions about.

Christine coaches "regular people" on problems – and opportunities - we all face. It's a show that reminds you that you are not alone, while also teaching things you can implement in your own life.

    Grieving the Sudden Loss of a Parent with Sarah

    Grieving the Sudden Loss of a Parent with Sarah

    This episode is about opening our hearts by diving deep into our grief. Today’s caller, Sarah, lost her father unexpectedly. It was not the way she planned to go through the transition. She is moving through grief and feels resistance to grief. We talk about how she can receive more support and know that she doesn’t have to do it on her own.
     
    [For show notes, go here: Christinehassler.com/episode355]
     
    The reality that our parents will die is something we all know. But, as it gets closer it is difficult to deal with. Whenever we have a looming feeling that something is close, we grasp onto anything that makes us feel like we have some sense of control.
     
    We all have our coping strategies to bypass our feelings. Going into our feelings can make us feel out of control. How do we feel more in control? We control. This is a strategy that is rewarded because when we control things we are seen as productive, and efficient. But we don’t give ourselves the grace to fall apart and we need to fall apart sometimes. Often, it is in the falling apart that we crack our heart open to fully grieve and truly feel what we need to feel so we are not suppressing, which causes disease within our body and spirit.
     
    The more we don’t allow ourselves to fall into the sea of grief, the more we are treading water, it seems like we are functioning; there is always a low-level suppression so, over time, it does impact us.
     
    When we have a way to swim through the sea of grief and we have markers, it doesn’t feel as daunting.
     
    Consider/Ask Yourself:
    Did something happen that didn’t go the way you planned and you’re having a hard time accepting it? Have you recently lost a parent or someone close to you or are you anticipating the loss of a parent soon? Do you attempt to control, plan, and strategize things when you feel helpless or that you don't know what to do? Are you afraid of grief because you think it is a pit you will fall into and never be able to get out?  
    Sarah’s Question:
    Sarah is experiencing grief because her father passed somewhat unexpectedly but is not allowing herself to fully feel it.
     
    Sarah’s Key Insights and Ahas:
    She prepared for her father’s passing for years. She feels he was ripped away from her. Control is a coping strategy for her. Her father never wanted to be a burden. She didn’t want her father to suffer. She blames herself when she doesn’t get the results she wants.  
    How to Get Over It and On With It:
    Release her need for control. Honor the love she felt for her father by fully allowing herself to grieve. Tell people she needs time to grieve and be open to their support. When she drops into grief, play the song she and her father connected with.  
    Resources:
    Christine Hassler — Join the Free Over It and On With It Community
    Christine Hassler Podcasts Including Coaches Corner
    Christine on Facebook
    Expectation Hangover, by Christine Hassler
    @ChristinHassler on Twitter
    @ChristineHassler on Instagram
    @SacredUnionCouples on Instagram
    Assist@ChristineHassler.com — Males who want to be on the show
    Jill@ChristineHassler.com — For information on any of my services
    Get on the Waitlist to be coached on the show.
    Get on the list to be notified about the upcoming certification program for coaches.

    • 31 min
    CC: Reair: How to Thrive as an Empath with Dr. Judith Orloff

    CC: Reair: How to Thrive as an Empath with Dr. Judith Orloff

    Dr. Judith Orloff is a New York Times bestselling author, psychiatrist and is on the UCLA psychiatric clinical faculty. Dr. Orloff specializes in treating empaths and sensitive people in her Los Angeles based private practice.
    Judith Orloff MD asserts that we are keepers of an innate intuitive intelligence so perceptive that it can tell us how to heal — and prevent — illness. Yet intuition and spirituality are the very aspects of our wisdom usually disenfranchised from traditional health care.
    Dr. Orloff’s latest book “The Empath’s Survival Guide: Life Strategies for Sensitive People” (Sounds True, 2017) is an invaluable resource to help sensitive people of all kinds develop healthy coping mechanisms in our high-stimulus world without experiencing compassion fatigue or burnout. Empaths can then fully embody their gifts of intuition, creativity, and compassion.
    Dr. Orloff’s work has been featured all over the world in various media outlets.  You can learn more about at www.drjudithorloff.com.

    • 35 min
    How Not to Be Afraid of Another Heartbreak with Gabriella

    How Not to Be Afraid of Another Heartbreak with Gabriella

    This episode is about how to get over heartbreak and open ourselves up to love again. Today’s caller, Gabriella, went through a recent breakup and wants guidance on how she can trust herself to not have her heart broken again. We never want to enter any situation hoping that what happened in the past doesn’t happen again. We discuss ways she can release her fears and open up to love to have a tender experience.
     
    [For show notes, go here: Christinehassler.com/episode354]
     
    When we have a heartbreak, we tend to look at how we can prevent it in the future, but that is a limiting way to look at it. Instead, we can consider how we can leverage the heartbreak and heartache to open our hearts up even more.
     
    After a breakup, ask yourself proactive questions such as:
     
    What did you learn from the relationship? Who do you want to be, in a relationship? What do you need in a relationship? What are the red flags you may have overlooked?  How did you show up in the relationship that you don't want to duplicate?  What values do you have?  
    We learn to trust ourselves by taking care of ourselves. If you feel you need an extra layer of support so you don’t fall into the same hole twice, allow yourself a misstep or two. If trusting yourself is hard, take steps to make it easier. Take baby steps.
     
    If you are nervous about making the same mistake twice or opening your heart again, think about the action steps you need to put in place so that you feel safer. When it comes to love, it is risky sometimes. We cannot prevent getting hurt. Love is tender but the risk is worth it. The reward of opening your heart and finding an aligned partnership or friendship is worth any risk.
     
    If you feel that something is missing in your life you may be focusing too much on what’s missing and not paying enough attention or gratitude to what you have.
     
    Consider/Ask Yourself:
    Are you going through a breakup or maybe haven’t gotten over one from your past? Do you not trust yourself when it comes to making the right decision when it comes to your next relationship? Are you romanticizing your past relationship or are you a hopeless romantic? What do you believe the purpose of a romantic relationship is?  
    Gabriella’s Question:
    Gabriella would like guidance on how to listen to her intuition, trust herself, and keep her heart open to a new relationship.
     
    Gabriella’s Key Insights and Ahas:
    She was in an intense relationship that ended recently. She believed her past partner was THE one. She is afraid of future heartbreak. She was blindsided and deeply hurt. She is in the beginning stages of her life. She became more self-aware and grew because of the breakup. She is a bit of a hopeless romantic. She had an inner child abandonment wound. She does inner child work and it helps. She is aware of her anxious attachment style. She doesn’t trust herself completely. She fears leaving people behind as she grows. She took some months away from dating. She loves being in love and partnership. She is in the middle of a career change. The ending of the relationship has been a catalyst for her breakthroughs. She understands that she is not in control and to go into new things with an open heart and open eyes.  
    How to Get Over It and On With It:
    Write a letter, something tangible, to herself about her red flags and share it with someone she trusts and ask them to hold her accountable. Make dating a discovery process about herself and the other person. Be grateful for the experience, do the healing, and move forward.  
    Takeaways:
    If you are going through a breakup or transition, consider the questions you are asking yourself and challenge yourself. Are they productive questions? Are they getting you anywhere? If you relate to being a hopeless romantic, take off your rose-colored glasses. Redefine what your definition of romance is. Remember, we may outgrow certain people. But it opens us up to meet people who are m

    • 34 min
    CC: Reair: EP 157: Trust Yourself, Stop Caring What Others Think and Feel your Feelings with Steve

    CC: Reair: EP 157: Trust Yourself, Stop Caring What Others Think and Feel your Feelings with Steve

    The heart of this coaching session is about self-compassion. Steve has been in his masculine and repressing his pain for much of his life. Another level of his pain is surfacing and that’s because his unconscious knows he is ready to deal with it. If you are at a point in your life where you feel like you have done a lot of personal growth work but pain is resurfacing in your life you do not want to miss this episode.
    It takes a lot of energy to repress pain. And, that’s why it feels hard to move forward in our lives, it feels hard to get a career off the ground, or to connect in relationships because we are unconsciously suppressing a lot of pain.
    Pain wants to come up and out. Our bodies don’t want to hold terrible memories or trauma inside. Our unconscious mind wants to let it go. So, it continues to make us feel uncomfortable until we deal with it. Not just mentally, but emotionally as well.
    It may be difficult to go back and to feel the pain of your childhood but you are feeling it anyway, 24/7 — it is just repressed. It is healthier to go into it and feel it fully with self-compassion so it can come up and out.
    When pain doesn’t have a way to express with compassion, it sits inside you dormant and continues to drive your choices and behaviors.
    Consider/Ask Yourself:
    Do you feel like you have hit a point where things were going well but old stuff started to come up? If you are a man, do you have difficulty feeling vulnerable? Do you judge it as weakness? Is vulnerability awkward for you? Maybe, it’s OK for others to be vulnerable but it’s hard for you? Do you trust yourself? Do you trust your decisions? Do you feel safe with your pain? Do you find yourself jumping to forgiveness too quickly? Are you able to mentally understand and justify things that have happened in your life but you notice the pain is still there? Steve’s Question:
    Steve is struggling with worrying about what other people think of him for what he believes to be the first time in his life.
    Steve’s Key Insights and Ahas:
    He’s always had to prove himself. He has tried to be different his entire life. He joined a gang as a teenager. He hasn’t forgiven himself for betraying himself. His experience built loyalty. He is able to relate to many different types of people. He has a warrior spirit. His girlfriend was murdered. He didn’t have a relationship with his father. He is in the process of up-leveling. He wants to eliminate his pain completely. How to Get Over It and On With It:
    He needs to quit judging himself and create a space to be vulnerable. He needs to trust himself more. He needs to spend time feeling his feelings. He needs to do the emotional section of Expectation Hangover. He should write down what being a loving father to himself looks like. Sponsors:
    Express — No time for an outfit change after work? Express rewrites the rules of dressing for a job, with style by delivering fashion-forward essentials to your door. Express has pants, work tops, dresses, and more. Listeners to Over It and On With It will receive $25 off when you spend $100 by using the code ‘Christine’ at checkout.
    Resources:
    Christine Hassler — Join the Free Over It and On With It Community
    Watch Christine Hassler on YouTube — Hit Subscribe!
    Christine’s Personal Mastery Course
    Expectation Hangover
    Christine Hassler Podcasts Including Coaches Corner
    Christine on Facebook
    Christine’s Books
    @ChristinHassler on Twitter
    @ChristineHassler on Instagram
    Assist@ChristineHassler.com — If you want to be a guest on this show.

    • 47 min
    Clearing Blocks Around Decision-making with Kathy

    Clearing Blocks Around Decision-making with Kathy

    This episode is about understanding why we have uncertainty when making decisions. Today’s caller, Kathy, wants to know how to make a decision about something important to her. She is hesitating and feels that it has been a pattern throughout her life. We discuss what in her past may have caused her hesitancy and how to clear the blocks she has around making decisions.
     
    [For show notes, go here: Christinehassler.com/episode353]
     
    When we feel we don't know what to do, or we don’t feel like making a decision at the moment, it actually is a decision. Oftentimes, we beat ourselves up when we feel we should decide something and we become frustrated that we can’t decide. Our pause, and the not knowing, is the window of time we need to get clarity.
     
    Many of us agonize over making a decision about whether it will be right or wrong. We may feel panic when a certain subject comes up. And, when panic comes up, it is often because of that unspoken fear.
     
    But, whenever we have trouble making decisions it usually means we don’t trust our inner wisdom. If we trusted ourselves fully, we wouldn’t agonize over the decision-making process. Everyone to some degree agonizes over decisions from time to time, especially big decisions.
     
    It may be that we resist making a decision about marriage and/or children because our family of origin wounds are still raw. Our inner child may not be ready to get into that trauma again. We may think it is our present-day self that is feeling the resistance or lack of excitement, but it is our inner child that is feeling it.
     
    If your head is making your decisions, you will make decisions from a place of fear. If you make decisions from the heart, it is the heart’s job to make decisions from love. The head keeps us safe. But when we play it too safe, we block love and we don’t get to see what is possible.
     
    Consider/Ask Yourself:
    Is there a conversation, question, or thought that brings up panic or anxiety for you? Do you want something in your life but are scared of it? As a child, did you have a lot of opportunities to make decisions, or were your decisions made for you? Were you sheltered or protected? Do you trust yourself to make a choice and to deal with the consequences?  
    Kathy’s Question:
    Kathy feels she may be making some decisions out of fear and would like guidance about how to trust in her decision-making process.
     
    Kathy’s Key Insights and Ahas:
    When conversations concerning marriage and children come about she is resisting talking about them.  She doesn’t trust her decision-making process. She was sheltered as a child. She didn’t have to work through big issues. She may have a rigid personality pattern. She has made decisions on a whim. She has a fierce inner critic. She is worried about making the wrong decision. Her parents respected and loved each other. She is clear that she wants a family. She and her partner come from different backgrounds. She worries about the compromises she may have to make in the future. She fears her partner is not being honest about where he wants to live. She may be withholding information from her partner about how she feels.  
    How to Get Over It and On With It:
    Listen to the Coaches Corner with Steven Kessler about the Five Personality Patterns. Turn her concerns into curiosity. Be okay with not knowing what to do. Speak with her partner about her true feelings. Don’t focus on what may go wrong when she makes a decision. Let her head and heart work together. Open your heart to possibilities.  
    Resources:
    Christine Hassler — Join the Free Over It and On With It Community
    Christine Hassler Podcasts Including Coaches Corner
    Christine on Facebook
    Expectation Hangover, by Christine Hassler
    @ChristinHassler on Twitter
    @ChristineHassler on Instagram
    @SacredUnionCouples on Instagram
    Assist@ChristineHassler.com — Males who want to be on the show
    Jill@ChristineHassler.com — For information

    • 28 min
    CC: Reair: EP 100: How to Find Yourself When You Feel Isolated and Lack Self-Esteem with Judy

    CC: Reair: EP 100: How to Find Yourself When You Feel Isolated and Lack Self-Esteem with Judy

    This episode is about being your authentic self and speaking your truth. I coach today’s caller, Judy, through her feelings of isolation, and empower her to have an honest conversation with her husband, and herself, about her needs.
    Loneliness is an epidemic, especially in this day and age when so many of us live alone. We are not close to our family geographically, or we don’t have a soul family or community to be a part of. We need a healing connection. We need to feel part of something, part of a tribe. We need to feel connected to ourselves. What often perpetuates a feeling of loneliness is a disconnection to ourselves that comes from judging ourselves and being hard on ourselves. If you suffer from loneliness or a lack of self-esteem you are not alone. Let the fact that you are not alone motivate you to gain confidence and to connect with a community.
    Speaking your truth is when you say what’s true for you, and you are able to communicate your needs. When are you not speaking your truth?
    Many of us think people pleasing is a way to get love and find validation. We think if people see the real us, they may not like us. The more you show the real you, and the more authentic you are, your relationship with yourself will improve, your self-esteem will improve, and the intimacy and connection you have with other people will also improve.
    It’s great to make other people happy but it’s more important to please ourselves first, by making self-honoring choices. People pleasing could be the reason you are feeling isolated. On some level, people pleasing is draining.
    Drop the people pleasing, up your self-esteem by making self-honoring choices and get out there and find your tribe!
     
    Consider/Ask Yourself:
    Do you feel isolated? Are you craving more connection? Are you in a marriage or relationship where you feel isolated? Do you feel like you are dependent on your partner or you are living according to their dreams and desires more than your own? Are you a people pleaser? Do you have a hard time making your needs a priority? Do you find it challenging to speak your truth? Judy’s Question:
    Judy wants to know how to find herself and how to raise her self-esteem.
    Judy’s Key Insights and Ahas:
    She has been continuously moving for a year. Her husband tries to support her but he doesn’t really get it. Her husband has a stronger personality than she does. She’s dependent on her husband and doesn’t go places on her own. She always puts other people first. She has a hard time saying no. She takes care of people, hoping it will help to build intimacy. How to Get Over It and On With It:
    She should be honest and vulnerable with her husband about her feelings. She should speak up when she feels she wants to say something. She should lean more into authenticity and less into people pleasing. She should spend some time on her own engaging with other people. Takeaways:
    If you are in a relationship with the opposite sex, and would like to improve your masculine/feminine communication dynamics, consider studying the subject more. If you are feeling isolated, start with a goal of talking to five new people every day, and then build on that number. Start getting yourself out there and finding your tribe. Speak your truth authentically. If you have trouble doing it, join the Inner Circle community. Authenticity is this month’s area of focus. Communicate your needs to the most important people in your life. Resources:
    Christine Hassler
    Christine Hassler Podcasts
    Inner Circle Membership Community
    @ChristinHassler on Twitter
    @christinehassler on Instagram
    Jill@ChristineHassler.com
    Expectation Hangover: Overcoming Disappointment in Work, Love, and Life,
    by Christine Hassler
    The Queen’s Code, by Alison A. Armstrong
    Understand Men PAX Program by Alison Armstrong
    David Deida

    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
1.5K Ratings

1.5K Ratings

clare1414 ,

Amazing!

This podcast has helped me so much!! Christine has a wealth of knowledge to share and so much compassion. Listening to this podcast has changed the trajectory of my life. I have learned so much and will forever be grateful for being able to learn from Christine.

Sister2017 ,

Smart but Not a great listener

I’ve listened to a few of Christine’s podcast episodes and had to unsubscribe. I noticed that during those interviews, she over-talked the interviewee. It’s weird as she was either completing their sentences or jumping to conclusions before they were done talking.

While I believe she has good intentions, it also seems like Christine has a “know it all” style of coaching (at times).

BraSher1422 ,

WARNING: Dangerous advice ahead

It’s clear from the onset that Christine has good intentions, and she asks good questions to get to know the people she is looking to help. She is articulate, and speaks in such a way that welcomes her guests to be vulnerable so she can deal appropriately with hard truths. From what I’ve heard, how she proposes the guests deal with those truths will likely have permanent negative consequences. Take the couple she speaks with about religion. Two thirty-something’s dated for about 6 months, religion important to both of them, however they are of different faiths. Each emphasized the importance of raising their children consistent with their background. Christine’s advice was to ignore this issue for the time being, and just be happy with one another without the pressure. “You are young, you have time,” she said. She then asked each of them how that advice made them feel. Where to begin. 1. A woman in her mid thirties that wants to have kids biologically does not have a lot of time. It takes months (at best) to meet a life partner, months to get to truly get to know them to make sure they are a good fit, then most people want to have kids after marriage, which means there needs to be an engagement. Start this clock when the woman in question is 34? The soonest she will be pregnant with her first child would be around 36, delivering around 37, then delivering the second child around 39. That’s best case scenario, if she breaks up with the guy today and meets Mr. Right in a matter of months. Not many are that lucky. Technically, any pregnancy after age 35 is considered geriatric in the medical community, as the risk of miscarriages and complications grows exponentially. Telling a 34 year old who wants to be a mother that she has a lot of time is false, and that approach would likely prevent her from having a family biologically. 2. These two people clearly care about each other. Christine asked them how they would feel if they were to break up, and both said it would be terrible. Christine gives the advice of the two of them “giving it a year” to see if besides religion, they feel compatible. Well, they called her because they both feel strongly about salvaging their relationship. They’ve been dating for 6+ months, which is plenty enough to see if you get along. The point being - we already know they are compatible besides the giant obstacle in their relationship they are calling her about. “Pretend the issue isn’t there” is one of the most immature pieces of advice I’ve ever heard. Part of being an adult is facing hard truths and making difficult choices. “But wouldn’t it be great if. . .” Is a game teenagers play. It doesn’t matter if it would be perfect if they were the same religion, or if neither cared about their religion very much. These two called Christine because they are having understandable difficulty navigating a difficult issue others probably relate to: you feel strongly about a person, but there are serious red flags. Christine’s advice? Ignore the red flags for now. I don’t envy Christine’s position, it’s a difficult question. Her advice in this instance was lazy, dangerous, and frankly pathetic. It was akin to saying “don’t worry about it.” Not because it’s not a serious issue, but because, And this is where I’m editorializing, I think Christine wanted to end on a positive note. So she took the easy way out - put the serious issue to the side. Let’s focus on how beautiful of a home this is, and not pay attention to the raging fire in the basement. 3. This bothered me the most. At the end, after she shared her advice of “give it time” and “ignore your relevant and serious obstacles for the next year”, she asked each of them how they felt about that advice. Can you imagine if parents used this method to ascertain whether they were exercising good judgement with their children? Imagine a common scenario: a child misbehaves, and a parent must choose between letting it slide, keeping the child happy and likely the parent happy in the short term (ignore the issue) which condones the behavior, or disciplining the child, making for a rougher hour or day for all involved, but teaching the proper lesson (the adult thing to do). Now, imagine if the parent asked the same question Christine did to measure whether the advice was good: “how do you feel right now with what I said?” You let it slide, the child would feel great. That doesn’t mean it’s the right decision. It’s the definition of being short sighted. Again, it’s lazy, immature, and pathetic. How someone can claim to be a life coach, and use how their guests feel in the next 5 minutes as a barometer as to whether the advice is sound or not baffles me. Last minor point - several times while giving advice, Christine discounts her own opinion, by saying something along the lines of “I’m Not sure if this is right” or “don’t make a decision because of me.” If she is going to market herself as a professional, she needs to own what she says. I’m not suggesting she be responsible for other peoples decisions, but taking the “but what do I know” approach is, I’ll say it again, immature. I feel sad for the two that sought her counsel that they couldn’t interact with someone who wasn’t afraid to be an adult. I think Christine has good intentions, and the one thing I agree with her on is I hope people don’t follow her short-sighted guidance.

Top Podcasts In Education

The Atlantic
TED and PRX
Dr. Jordan B. Peterson
iHeartPodcasts
Daily Stoic | Wondery
Motiversity

You Might Also Like

Terri Cole
Mark Groves
Michelle Chalfant
Lacy Phillips
Dear Media
The Holistic Psychologist