60 episodes

Peace Meal is an Emily Program podcast that discusses topics related to eating disorders, body image issues, and how society may contribute to distorted thinking.

Peace Meal The Emily Program

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.9 • 47 Ratings

Peace Meal is an Emily Program podcast that discusses topics related to eating disorders, body image issues, and how society may contribute to distorted thinking.

    Temperament-Based Therapy with Supports (TBT-S) with Laura Hill

    Temperament-Based Therapy with Supports (TBT-S) with Laura Hill

    Episode description:

    Dr. Laura Hill is an international eating disorder consultant focusing on brain-based eating disorder treatment approaches. She is an Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at The Ohio State University and Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at The University of California, San Diego. She is one of the original founders of the Academy for Eating Disorders and the Director of the organization now known as NEDA from 1990 to 1994. In addition, Dr. Hill is the founder and former President and Chief Executive Officer of The Center for Balanced Living.

    In this episode of Peace Meal, Dr. Hill introduces an emerging brain-based treatment called Temperament-Based Therapy with Supports (TBT-S). TBT-S helps people with eating disorders understand their unique temperament so that they can use it as a tool for recovery. Distinguishing between traits and symptoms, Dr. Hill explains that temperament includes traits like impulsivity, introversion, and determination, while symptoms include eating disorder behaviors, thoughts, and emotions. She emphasizes that temperament traits are neither good nor bad; what’s important is how they are applied. TBT-S helps people with eating disorders and their support people use their traits more productively to aid in recovery. Dr. Hill also talks about the importance of support in treatment and recovery. In the end, she addresses how providers can use TBT-S to complement other treatment approaches. 



    We cover:



    The basics of Temperament-Based Therapy with Supports (TBT-S) 

    How TBT-S is supported by brain research

    How people with eating disorders can use TBT-S to express their traits more productively and aid in their recovery

    The role of support people in the TBT-S model

    How TBT-S differs from and complements other treatment modalities



    In Dr. Hill’s words:



    On the traits we’re all given: “Traits are genetically endowed. You don’t get to choose your trait, you just try to make them better.”

    On the importance of temperament to eating disorder treatment: “What we are finding is that eating disorders have a huge relapse… Our theory is that the relapses are due to us not addressing the traits enough.”

    On the difficulty of imagining life without an eating disorder: “When clients say, ‘I can’t imagine my life without ED,’ they were telling us the truth. I can’t imagine my life without my traits because it’s who I am.”



    Learn more about The Emily Program online or by calling 1-888-364-5977.



    About the podcast:

    Peace Meal is a podcast hosted by The Emily Program and Veritas Collaborative that covers topics related to eating disorders, body image, and how society may influence our thinking.

    You can find Peace Meal on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or Google Podcasts. If you enjoy our show, please rate, review, subscribe, and tell your friends!

    Are you interested in being a guest on Peace Meal? Email podcast@emilyprogram.com for more information.

    • 36 min
    Episode 59: Choosing Recovery with Kathryn

    Episode 59: Choosing Recovery with Kathryn

    Episode description: 

    ​​Kathryn is a 31-year-old woman who enjoys cooking, hosting friends, teaching music, and getting lost in nature. Best known for her big heart and passion for life, she lives in a larger body and advocates for people to take up more space. Kathryn joins us in this episode of Peace Meal to share her eating disorder story, including how living in a larger body has impacted her recovery. 

    For over 20 years, food was the center of Kathryn’s life. She kept trying to figure out what was happening on her own, blaming herself for her struggles. After talking with the people closest to her, she decided to seek help even though she didn’t have a lot of hope that anything would work. 

    As soon as Kathryn reached out for help, however, she says it felt like a “warm hug.” In speaking with an eating disorder specialist, she discovered that she did, in fact, have an illness. It was not her fault. While she experienced many barriers throughout her recovery living in a larger body, she grew to learn that all food is good food and that you should take up as much space as you need. With the support of her treatment team, friends, and family, she learned how to take care of herself, live as the most authentic version of herself, and make sure all her needs are met.

    We cover:



    How a decades-long struggle with food led to an eating disorder diagnosis 

    The possible obstacles of the eating disorder recovery process

    How our culture invalidates eating disorders, especially if the person is in a larger body

    What it’s like to be in an eating disorder treatment group as the only person in a larger body

    The importance of taking up the space you need 



    In Kathryn’s words:



    On her relationship with food before recovery: “Food was my higher power. It affected my emotions. It controlled everything. Food was always the focus… It was suffocating.”

    On life in recovery: “Freedom is probably the best word. I energetically take up all the space that I need. I make sure that my needs are met… I just get to be me. There are no more lingering clouds of doubt… I just get to live now.”

    On her advice to someone currently struggling with an eating disorder: “Choose healing above anything else.... Living life the way you have been and choosing a path of recovery… Both are hard, but choose healing.”



    Learn more about The Emily Program online or by calling 1-888-364-5977.

    _

    About the podcast:

    Peace Meal is a podcast that explores topics related to eating disorders, body image, and how society may influence our thinking.

    You can find Peace Meal on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or Google Podcasts. If you enjoy our show, please rate, review, subscribe, and tell your friends!

    Are you interested in being a guest on Peace Meal? Email podcast@emilyprogram.com for more information.

    • 28 min
    Advancing Eating Disorders Education with Shikha Advani

    Advancing Eating Disorders Education with Shikha Advani

    Episode description:

    Shikha Advani is an incoming master’s student and dietetic intern at Boston University who is passionate about eating disorders awareness, as well as diversity, equity, and inclusion in the nutrition and eating disorder fields. As a teenager, Shikha battled anorexia and orthorexia. She hopes her story can help others with eating disorders, no matter where they are in their recovery process.

    In this episode of Peace Meal, Shikha discusses what her relationship with food and her body was growing up, how professionals and her loved ones responded to her eating disorder, and how she believes nutrition and eating disorders curricula in universities could be improved. She talks about the weight bias and racism she experienced as a South Asian woman living in a larger body, including the praise she received from doctors for weight loss. Shikha also emphasizes the importance of therapy in addition to any other kind of treatment for eating disorders. In addition, she dives into what her dietetics curriculum at her university was lacking, including topics like social justice, fat positivity, and more, and what it was like to push back against outdated ideas. Finally, she discusses her hopes for the future of the dietetics and eating disorder fields.

    We cover:



    How weight bias can prolong an eating disorder diagnosis

    Why recovery from anorexia is more than just weight restoration

    How eating disorders can take away the joy of food

    How Shikha pushed back against the weight-centric curriculum of her university

    What Shikha’s hopes are for the dietetics and eating disorder fields going forward



    In Shikha’s words:



    On the true meaning of food: “[I’ve] learned that food is more than what you should put in your body… food is joy, food is something that represents culture, food is so much more.”

    On the future of the dietetics and eating disorder fields: “I’m really hoping to see a lot more diversity, equity, and inclusion in the field. I’m seeing a lot of people talk about why diversity is important, but a lot of people tend to forget about the equity and inclusion part of it.”

    On inherent worthiness: “Diet culture is rampant and there’s constantly people around you that will tell you, you are not worthy because of the size of your body, the color of your skin, but you’re strong and you’re worthy.”



    Follow Shikha Advani on Instagram @nutrition_by_sa

    Learn more about The Emily Program online or by calling 1-888-364-5977.

    _

    About the podcast:

    Peace Meal is a podcast that explores topics related to eating disorders, body image, and how society may influence our thinking.

    You can find Peace Meal on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or Google Podcasts. If you enjoy our show, please rate, review, subscribe, and tell your friends!

    Are you interested in being a guest on Peace Meal? Email podcast@emilyprogram.com for more information.

    • 25 min
    Episode 57: Supporting a Partner with an Eating Disorder with Dana Harron

    Episode 57: Supporting a Partner with an Eating Disorder with Dana Harron

    Episode description:

    Dr. Dana Harron is a practicing psychologist, the founder and director of Monarch Wellness & Psychotherapy, and the author of Loving Someone with an Eating Disorder: Understanding, Supporting and Connecting with Your Partner. She joins us in this episode of Peace Meal to discuss how partners of people with eating disorders can support their loved one through illness and recovery.

    Dana discusses the common mistakes that partners of people with eating disorders can make and how to avoid those mistakes. She also provides practical tips for approaching a partner when you notice unhealthy behaviors and how to respond when a partner shares that they are struggling with food or their body. In addition, Dana covers useful strategies for supporting a partner during eating disorder recovery, emphasizing the importance of self-care to this process.

    We cover:



    The impact of eating disorders on close relationships

    Mistakes commonly made by partners of those with eating disorders

    How to approach a loved one when they display warning signs of an eating disorder

    What to say when a loved one shares they are struggling with food or their body

    Strategies for self-care and for caring for your partner with an eating disorder



    In Dana’s words:



    On the confusing nature of eating disorders: “Eating disorders are particularly tricky for loved ones because it seems choiceful. I think it’s really important to keep in mind that it is not. Nobody would decide, ‘I don’t want to be properly nourished.’”

    On communicating with a partner who has an eating disorder: “You don’t have to say the perfect thing. In fact, the pressure to say the perfect thing, I think, is part of what makes people say all kinds of things that are very far from perfect. Just shoot for good enough."

    On respecting our different struggles: “We all have a different cognitive set. So for one person, food is difficult; for another person, sleep is difficult. I often say, telling someone with an eating disorder to ‘just eat differently’ is like telling an insomniac to ‘just go to sleep.’ It’s not that easy."



    Learn more about Dr. Dana Harron on her website. Find a copy of Dana’s book, Loving Someone with an Eating Disorder: Understanding, Supporting and Connecting with Your Partner, on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or IndieBound. 

    Learn more about The Emily Program online or by calling 1-888-364-5977.

    _

    About the podcast:

    Peace Meal is a podcast that explores topics related to eating disorders, body image, and how society may influence our thinking.

    You can find Peace Meal on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or Google Podcasts. If you enjoy our show, please rate, review, subscribe, and tell your friends!

    Are you interested in being a guest on Peace Meal? Email podcast@emilyprogram.com for more information.

    • 36 min
    Episode 56: The Healing Power of Horses with Lisa Whalen

    Episode 56: The Healing Power of Horses with Lisa Whalen

    Episode description:

    Lisa Whalen, PhD, is the author of Stable Weight: A Memoir of Horses, Hunger, and Hope. Her writing has also appeared in An Introvert in an Extrovert World, The Simpsons’ Beloved Springfield, Introvert, Dear, and Adanna, among other publications. Lisa teaches writing and literature at North Hennepin Community College and is an equestrian and volunteer for the Animal Humane Society.

    In this episode of Peace Meal, Lisa describes two key components of her eating disorder recovery: writing and horseback riding. Underscoring the multifaceted nature of the healing process, she reflects on how writing and riding each offered unique lessons for her mind and body. Writing, she explains, supported and extended her therapy lessons, while riding provided a space to put the lessons into practice. Lisa introduces us to a few of the horses that served as mentors throughout her recovery, highlighting the lessons they could teach us all about staying present, taking up space, and being imperfect. She then translates how these and other recovery “nuggets”—the wisdom learned from horses, writing, and therapy—continue to serve her life and career.

    We cover:



    The mental health benefits of writing, even if we never share our writing with others

    What horses can teach us about taking up space and owning our imperfections

    The power of body language in both animals and people

    How traits like perfectionism, high sensitivity, and introversion can be harnessed for good

    Why recovery—like all growth and learning—is best taken one step at a time



    In Lisa’s words:



    On the therapeutic role of horses: “For me, riding horses felt like a therapy practicum… I learned all this stuff while I was in therapy, and the horses were forcing me to practice it over and over.”

    On embracing imperfection: “There’s no end to the learning. There’s no perfect. You’re always working toward it, but it’s never a standard because the horses aren’t perfect—and they don’t care if they’re perfect or not.”

    On the support of therapy: “It started off for me as a safe space. It was this place I could go and I could talk about all the worst stuff about myself and there was no judgment. She was only rooting for me. She only wanted me to succeed and to be happy and healthy, and she had the tools and the skills to help me do it.”



    Learn more about Lisa on her website and follow her on social media @LisaIrishWhalen. Find her book, Stable Weight: A Memoir of Horses, Hunger, and Hope, at Hopewell Publications and on Amazon.

    Learn more about The Emily Program online or by calling 1-888-364-5977.



    About the podcast:

    Peace Meal is an Emily Program podcast that discusses topics related to eating disorders, body image issues, and how society may contribute to distorted thinking.

    You can find Peace Meal on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or Google Podcasts. If you enjoy our show, please rate, review, subscribe, and tell your friends!

    Are you interested in being a guest on Peace Meal? Email podcast@emilyprogram.com for more information.

    • 36 min
    Episode 55: Eating Disorders in Fiction with Emily Layden

    Episode 55: Eating Disorders in Fiction with Emily Layden

    Episode description:

    Emily Layden is a writer and former high school English teacher from upstate New York. A graduate of Stanford University, her writing has appeared in The New York Times, Marie Claire, The Billfold, and Runner's World. She joins us in this episode of Peace Meal to discuss her debut novel All Girls. We explore the depiction of disordered eating and anxiety in the book and society more generally, using Emily’s experience with the co-occurring concerns as context along the way. 

    We center our conversation on one of the characters of All Girls, Macy, who struggles with clinical anxiety and an eating disorder resembling ARFID. Emily tells us about her decision to write Macy as she did, eschewing graphic descriptions of behaviors to highlight Macy's anxious thoughts instead. She describes what she hopes All Girls adds to the larger conversation about eating disorders and the adolescent females among whom eating disorders are particularly prevalent. Emphasizing the importance of taking both eating disorders and young women more seriously, we explore how society tends to think similarly of both.

    We cover:



    The relationship between anxiety, obsessive thoughts, and disordered eating/eating disorders 

    How exercising compassion with her students became a way for Emily to exercise compassion for herself

    How our culture routinely dismisses or trivializes eating disorder stories and other experiences prevalent among young women

    How one character in All Girls, Macy, can widen our cultural understanding of eating disorders

    What the reader response to Macy says about changing attitudes toward eating disorders and mental illness



    In Emily’s words:



    On the connection between anxiety and disordered eating: “Macy is anxious, you see in her chapter, about so many things entirely unrelated to her body or to food. But she copes with that anxiety through avoidant and restrictive behaviors.”  

    On typical eating disorder depictions: “So often when we have a depiction of an eating disorder on TV or in literature, it tends to be this very narrow reflection of the experience.”

    On the parallel between society’s understanding of young women and of eating disorders: “I think that there’s this whole culture that says that girls are not really whole people and thinks that they are trivial or overly emotional… and I think we see a lot of that same flattening with our cultural thinking about eating disorders.”



    Find Emily on Instagram @emilylayden and at emilylayden.com. Learn more about The Emily Program online or by calling 1-888-364-5977.



    About the podcast:

    Peace Meal is an Emily Program podcast that discusses topics related to eating disorders, body image issues, and how society may contribute to distorted thinking.

    You can find Peace Meal on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or Google Podcasts. If you enjoy our show, please rate, review, subscribe, and tell your friends!

    Are you interested in being a guest on Peace Meal? Email podcast@emilyprogram.com for more information.

    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
47 Ratings

47 Ratings

jax almost 50 ,

Recovery!

After 20 years or suffering from a debilitating ED, I have found the strength through this podcast to begin the very challenging climb to recovery and building a new relationship with my body! Thank you so much!!!!

grateful Missouri Synner ,

Genuine experts

I’m super suspicious of corporations taking over eating disorder treatment & subscribed to this because of the Emily Program turning into a big corporation taking over smaller clinics, like the Centerfor Balanced Luving in Columbus, OH, which was known for its innovation.Today I actually heard Dr. Laura hill speaking to Dr. Jillian Lampert and actually mention Dr. Walter Kaye. These are 3 well-known well respected clinicians in the field which deal with the actual human brain with actual medical human brain tests, like MRIs and FMRIs.I’ll bet that most of the eating disorder treatment corporations with dozens of clinics all over the country have never heard of these 3 researchers.But I bet they will still call their treatment updated and cutting edge. Don’t believe them. But I do belueve 100% that this one episode of this one podcast, alone, speaks very highly of the Emily Program.

sneakykikiriki ,

Very helpful

I listened to this when I was trying to understand my ED recovery more, and I shared several episodes with my partner to help him understand ED and recovery and he found it helpful also.

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