10 episodes

In this podcast, Caylena Cahill, founder and creative director of CC Photo & Media, a photo-centric marketing company, aims to create a healthier, wealthier & happier world by creating and providing a resource for people to find inspiration, tactics and information and participating in the conversation happening around food, food systems, health, wellness, independent business/entrepreneurship and technology. Cahill interviews guests about the their personal backgrounds in the food and health industries, business/career development and the larger issues facing society as they relate to health, food, business and creativity. This show straddles the line between inspirational, tactical and informational by sharing inspirational stories of successful people, to get inside their mind and understand how they think, their values and emotions; specific tactics and tools to get you going; and key insights, resources and data points to keep you informed.

Put a Fork In It! Caylena Cahill

    • Business

In this podcast, Caylena Cahill, founder and creative director of CC Photo & Media, a photo-centric marketing company, aims to create a healthier, wealthier & happier world by creating and providing a resource for people to find inspiration, tactics and information and participating in the conversation happening around food, food systems, health, wellness, independent business/entrepreneurship and technology. Cahill interviews guests about the their personal backgrounds in the food and health industries, business/career development and the larger issues facing society as they relate to health, food, business and creativity. This show straddles the line between inspirational, tactical and informational by sharing inspirational stories of successful people, to get inside their mind and understand how they think, their values and emotions; specific tactics and tools to get you going; and key insights, resources and data points to keep you informed.

    42: Celine Beitchman, Institute for Culinary Education

    42: Celine Beitchman, Institute for Culinary Education

    About Celine Beitchman









    Celine Beitchman was an instructor, curriculum developer and director at the Natural Gourmet Institute for 10 years. She studied under the school’s founder, Annemarie Colbin, Ph.D., and is an expert in nutrition education for healthcare professionals, chefs and home cooks alike.  



    Chef Celine has prior experience as a private chef and in special events, catering, kitchen production, operations and management. She’s worked as a line cook, garde manger, food stylist and pastry chef, and appeared in Bon Appetit, Brit + Co, HuffPost and Mind Body Green as a health food expert.



    Chef Celine joined the Institute of Culinary Education in 2019 to teach Health-Supportive Culinary Arts career classes and coming professional development courses in culinary nutrition and food therapy. She has a master’s in clinical nutrition, a bachelor’s in film and a Level 3 wine certification from WSET. “I look at wine, food and nutrition as a continuum,” Chef Celine says. “I’m always able to find some meaningful connection, and I’ll help you find that, too. That’s my attitude when it comes to teaching.”



    Celine’s Official Bio



     



    About ICE & Natural Gourmet Institute









    Founded in 1975 by Peter Kump, the Institute of Culinary Education offers highly regarded six to 13-month career training programs in Culinary Arts, Pastry & Baking Arts, Health-Supportive Culinary Arts, Restaurant & Culinary Management, and Hospitality & Hotel Management, professional certificate programs in The Art of Cake Decorating and Artisan Bread Baking, and other continuing education programs for culinary professionals. Our campuses in New York and Los Angeles offer ICE students the opportunity to develop their careers in two of the nation’s most exciting food cities. With a global curriculum, dedicated instructors, a strong record in job placements and a clear entrepreneurial focus, ICE is recognized by top chefs and hospitality professionals as a leading pathway to begin or continue a wide range of careers.



    America’s Best Culinary School* now offers America’s first nationally accredited health-supportive, plant-based curriculum. Annemarie Colbin, Ph.D. founded the Natural Gourmet Cookery School in her Upper West Side apartment in 1977, two years after Peter Kump founded his eponymous cooking school (now ICE) in an Upper West Side apartment. Both received rave reviews, grew, became accredited diploma programs and changed their names over the following 30 years. In 2019, the educational institutions collaborated to offer the Natural Gourmet Institute’s unique health-supportive approach to cooking at the Institute of Culinary Education, which cultivates creativity and innovation in every kitchen classroom. Aspiring chefs and food enthusiasts can explore ICE’s fifth and newest career program to customize their education in America’s culinary capital.



    Learn more on ICE’s Website



    This episode has been sponsored by ICE.



    Our Conversation



    Celine and I had a very wide ranging conversation, beginning on a common point of having lived in France, and things blossom from there. Celine has some really incredible stories from her life in food and cooking. We discuss:




    Celine’s Background and Professional Development
    National Gourmet Institute – what it is, what her role in it is, and more
    Her role as ICE Director of Nutrition, what that entails, what ICE is trying to do in that regard and why focus on health/nutrition and cooking, how it is different from the “traditional” way
    Living abroad
    Gluten
    And so much more




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    Donat

    41: Jen Herman of Earth, Wind, and Fuego

    41: Jen Herman of Earth, Wind, and Fuego

    About Jen Herman, MSW, COO & Co-founder









    Jen previously worked as the Sexual Assault Response Team Coordinator in Dutchess County before co-founding Earth, Wind & Fuego in 2017. She received a Masters in Social Work at Adelphi University. Jen has worked and volunteered for human service agencies throughout Dutchess, Orange and Ulster counties and received the Asset Builder/Outstanding Youth Worker Award in 2015 from the Orange County Executive’s Youth Bureau Awards. She served as a commission member of the Dutchess County Human Rights Commission and volunteers with Poughkeepsie O+ and  Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County. As a poet and spoken word artist, Jen uses her writing and performance as a platform to shed light on systemic oppression and privilege, calling for unity among all people. She won the first ever Milkweed Poetry Slam in Sugar Loaf, NY, for her piece “Pulse” on the Orlando nightclub massacre.



    About Earth, Wind & Fuego



    Earth, Wind & Fuego is a social enterprise radicalizing hiring, training and workplace culture to create sustainable solutions to poverty through inclusive training and employment opportunities. As a social enterprise, we seek, build and sustain opportunities. We envision a community where everyone is able to live out their right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness and share their #POUGHTENTIAL with the world.



     Every purchase from Earth, Wind & Fuego supports our mission to train and hire community members who face physical, mental & societal barriers to employment.



    Website https://earthwindfuego.com/



    Email earthwindfuego@gmail.com



    Our Conversation



    Jen and I met through the Poughkeepsie Underwear Factory (a previous guest on the podcast), which is where Earth, Wind & Fuego is presently housed. PUF is a multi-purpose space that is a repurposed factory in Poughkeepsie. The space has a rentable commercial kitchen which is now home to Jen’s restaurant. As part of my inclination toward community revitalization, as opposed to the negative connotation of gentrification, I’m interested in finding ways we can live by the adage “a rising tide raises all boats”. So, with that in mind, I’m always interested when I hear of alternative business models that can make a social change and actually help people improve their lives. Enter, Earth Wind and Fuego – a restaurant that has a highly effective work training program that graduates employable people in food service.



    We discussed:




    How Jen went from being a social worker to a restaurant owner
    Jen’s interest in social justice and progress
    Jen’s personal health struggles and how she overcame them
    Earth, Wind & Fuego… how and why it began, how it’s grown and where they are going
    How to build work training programs to encourage skills development and turn those who have otherwise faced challenges in finding work into motivated and qualified employees 
    And more.




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    • 1 hr 12 min
    40: Mary Waldner, Founder of Mary’s Gone Crackers

    40: Mary Waldner, Founder of Mary’s Gone Crackers

    About Mary









    Mary Waldner was a practicing psychotherapist in the California Bay Area for 27 years before starting Mary’s Gone Crackers, the gluten-free, organic cracker and snack company and inadvertently becoming, “The Mary”. After having been sick most of her life, in 1994, she finally discovered what was wrong when she received a diagnosis: Celiac Disease. Always having had an interest in health and healthy foods, even before it was trendy, and especially with the added need from her new diagnosis, she saw a need for nutritious, gluten free options that also tasted good, both for herself, and eventually, in the marketplace. She literally began by experimenting in her kitchen, and eventually, after many iterations, trials and tribulations, she managed to get the crackers sold in grocery stores around the country. It wasn’t an easy journey, and she claims, not even fun, but as the Co-Founder, Co-CEO, Board Chair and often the only woman in the room, Mary certainly accomplished a lot by not sacrificing her values and, as she often discusses, cultivating her relationship within herself. Mary offers a unique perspective when sharing her stories and insights as a mental health practitioner, health enthusiast and a food company entrepreneur.



    Our Conversation



    As with several of my guests, it seems, Mary and I first encountered via Hudson Valley Women in Business. Last winter, Mary was the guest speaker at one of the HVWIB monthly meetings. At the time, I was going through a LOT in my personal life – as I’ve sometimes discussed. Harboring feelings of failure, low-self worth, and continuous anxiety and low-grade depression at the time of the event, getting myself out to the event was a feat in itself, if I do say so myself. And, I am certainly glad I did. Much has changed in my own life since that time, but to attend an event where the speaker was a therapist-turned-food-entrepreneur, I was certainly fascinated. At the time, her stories of mental health and the challenges of the instability and rejection faced within entrepreneurship were what resonated more than anything. I was truly inspired by her perspective on the concept of success, which is not so much about external circumstances and achievements, but rather about cultivating inner peace and love — my words, not hers, but this is the general idea. This is an idea I’ve been thinking over and meditating on even more in the last few weeks. In any case, it took months, but once I got myself back on my feet and feeling better, Mary and I set a date for the podcast!



    In this episode, we cover the long and often painful, challenging and stressful journey of building Mary’s Gone Crackers from a personal kitchen experiment to a venture-funded, profit-making cracker business. Mary is no longer part of the company. We discuss this, as well as her own personal journey and insights on mental health, physical health and how to stay sane while going through this crazy entrepreneurial journey – from the perspective of someone not only professionally trained, but extremely practiced, in the science and art of psychology.



    In this conversation we discuss:




    Building a consumer packaged goods business
    Why it’s so important to carve out your brand values at the start… and then stick to them even when it gets hard
    How to stay sane when entrepreneurship gets tough
    What Success means
    An in-depth conversation around her story




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    • 1 hr 18 min
    39: Ilana Charette, Life Coach

    39: Ilana Charette, Life Coach

    About Ilana









    Ilana Charette is the lap band weight loss surgery coach. She teaches women how to trust themselves and their bodies again. Certified through The Life Coach School, Ilana is 32, married and a mother of 2.



    Ilana started Weight Watchers for the first time in middle school. She vowed to herself in high school that once she figured out this whole weight thing, she was going to devote her life to helping anyone who would listen with the same. At the age of 23 in 2010, and 292 lbs, she decided to have lap band bariatric surgery. She lost 60 lbs that first year and then slowly gained it all back, and then some, through her first pregnancy in 2015. Her weight had climbed to 320 lbs.



    It was when she became a new mom that she decided things needed to change. It was in that decision that self-love and compassion was introduced — losing weight in a way that she could live her life. She stopped ignoring her lap band and had it removed in 2017. She then maintained her weight throughout her 2nd pregnancy and has since dropped 75 lbs and became the life and weight loss coach she now is.



    Through thought work and mind management, she has learned to feel the fear and do it anyway. Thoughts are so incredibly powerful and she wants to help others let go of the shame from regain and move into emotional freedom — while losing the weight as a byproduct.



    Follow along as she loses 160 lbs in public.



    Instagram: www.instagram.com/changes_2b_fitFacebook: www.facebook.com/ilanacharetteWebsite: www.whattheweightloss.comEmail: ilana@whattheweightloss.com



    Our Conversation



    This episode features Ilana Charette, a life and weight loss coach. Ilana and I first met during a Hudson Valley Women in Business retreat earlier this year. I was fascinated by her story and knew immediately that I wanted to interview her for the podcast.



    Like many people, myself included, Ilana had struggled with her weight throughout her life, but it wasn’t until she had lap band surgery that didn’t work, that she really realized something else needed to change if she was going to lose the weight, for good. I’ll let her tell you the rest during the interview. 



    In the show, we go into more than just her story of weight loss. We discuss the mental shifts needed to start actually making positive shifts in our lives, the power of the mind, what self love is and why it’s so invaluable, the concept of intuitive eating and how it’s helped Ilana to lose weight without dieting – and so much more. It’s a full episode, so stick around.



    We cover:




    Ilana’s history with weight/weight loss
    Weight loss through intuitive eating
    Self love and dignity
    Why it’s so important to do simple things like keep a clean kitchen
    How the brain works for changing behavior and mindset
    The mental work that needs to be done for sustainable weight loss
    and so much more.




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    • 1 hr 31 min
    38: Regina Anderson, Executive Director of the Food Recovery Network

    38: Regina Anderson, Executive Director of the Food Recovery Network

    Regina Anderson joined the Food Recovery Network as the Executive Director in 2015 and is responsible for setting the vision, strategy and fundraising efforts for Food Recovery Network. Regina works with the amazing team at national headquarters, stakeholders and partners around the country to achieve ambitious goals. Overall, FRN’s goal is to support the higher education to be the first sector where food recovery is the norm and not the exception. But Regina won’t stop there. Businesses, events, public institutions also have a role in reducing food waste at the source. They also have a role to recover their surplus food and Regina wants to ensure they are integrated within the vibrant FRN network to make that happen.



    About FRN:



    Food Recovery Network is the largest student movement fighting food waste and hunger in America.



    In 2011, Ben, Mia, Cam, and Evan, students at the University of Maryland, College Park noticed good dining hall food was ending up in the trash at the end of the night. By the end of the school year, FRN at UMD had recovered 30,000 meals to DC-area hunger-fighting nonprofits. 



    During the Spring semester of 2012, the second FRN chapter was founded at Brown University. UMD and Brown soon joined forces with two other campus food recovery programs at University of California, Berkeley and Pomona College.



    In May 2013, the Sodexo Foundation provided FRN with founding funding to hire a full-time staff and transition into a professional nonprofit! Since then, we’ve swept the nation and made higher education the first sector where food recovery is the norm and not the exception.



    Website: https://www.foodrecoverynetwork.org/



    Our Conversation:



    I first met Regina when I heard her on a panel at the International Society of Culinary Professionals conference in NYC. The topic was food waste and therefore, food recovery. Food waste is not just an issue of throwing out uneaten or spoiled food at home, but actually the overproduction of prepared foods at a commercial scale. The panel covered both aspects, and I was intrigued on the topic. Regina, the executive director of the Food Recovery Network, spoke about the efforts of that organization to reduce food waste on a commercial scale by “recovering” it – transferring leftovers to non-profits and other associations that would get the food to people in need.



    Some topics we covered:




    Regina’s background & how she got involved with FRN
    How FRN got started
    The transition and growth of the organization
    What is food recovery and why is it needed 
    How FRN recovered more than 30,000 meals in its first year, alone
    What is a hunger fighting partner
    What is Food Recovery Verified
    And more!

    • 1 hr 22 min
    37: Caroline Burnell, Marketing Manager of Good Food Institute

    37: Caroline Burnell, Marketing Manager of Good Food Institute

     



    About Caroline Burnell:



    The Good Food Institute (GFI) Senior Marketing Manager Caroline Bushnell has a long-standing love of all things plant-based. Caroline is using that passion to help leading retailers and manufacturers expand their market for plant-based foods beyond vegans and vegetarians to include flexitarians and meat eaters.









    Prior to joining GFI, Caroline served as the Director of Marketing for Celestial Seasonings. With a background in brand management, finance, and consulting, she is intimately familiar with the challenges and opportunities of the food business. She brings this expertise to GFI where shes ushering in a new era of plant-based business opportunity, assisting companies in bringing plant-based products to a broader consumer base.



    About The Good Food Institute:



     



    We work with scientists, investors, and entrepreneurs to make groundbreaking good food a reality. We focus on clean meat and plant-based alternatives to animal products—foods that are more delicious, safer to eat, and better for the planet than their outdated counterparts.



    Website: https://www.gfi.org/



     



    Our Conversation



    Caroline and I first met at the Menus of Change summit at the Culinary Institute of America. (If you’re not familiar with the Menus of Change event, check out my blog post about it at https://caylena.com/menus-of-change/) I had heard of GFI prior to that, but was happy to have made the connection.



    The Good Food Institute is an organization that is truly intriguing, both in the areas in which it focuses, but also in how it goes about doing the work of its mission. I’m fascinated by topics surrounding food technology, as well as the state of using science to influence food and what we eat. I’m not a vegan or vegetarian, or an animal rights activist, in fact, I quite enjoy eating meat and animal products, but I do see the value of eating more plants, and at the very least, calling into question how meat is produced – insofar as to increase the sustainability of the food system. That’s why I found it so fascinating to talk to Caroline and learn more about the GFI.



    It took a while for us to connect, but we finally did and this interview was recorded in January 2019, after being on hiatus from podcasting for a handful of months. I am releasing it now, in September 2019.



    Our conversation covers several topics from plant-based eating, to marketing alternative food companies. Caroline stays on message with GFI and covers the main talking points about plant-based, meat alternatives, lab-grown meats, and so on. It’s a great intro to the state of the industry (as of Jan 2019). We also delve into Caroline’s extensive marketing background and have some marketing/branding tips for food businesses. 



    All in all, an interesting conversation.



    Topics include: 




    Plant-based eating – basics
    Sustainability and the food industry
    Marketing alternative food products
    Why meat alternatives are no longer just for vegans/vegetarians
    The state of lab-grown meat
    And more…








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    • 1 hr 3 min

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