25 episodes

Sports medicine is a constantly evolving field, with hundreds of new articles published each month on the topic. This ever-growing wealth of information can make it challenging to stay updated on the newest approaches and techniques, and to know which data should actually change your practice. Join orthopedic surgeons, Dr. Catherine Logan and Dr. Ashley Bassett, as they chat about the most recent developments in sports medicine and dissect through all the noise. On each episode of The Sports Docs podcast, the hosts will tackle a specific injury – from ACL tears to shoulder instability – and review the top research from various high-impact journals that month, including The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, Sports Health, Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, and more. The Sports Docs will also be joined by experts in the field of sports medicine – orthopedic surgeons, nonoperative sports medicine specialists, athletes, physical therapists, athletic trainers and others – to provide a fresh and well-rounded perspective based on their unique experiences. The Sports Docs – Dr. Logan & Dr. Bassett – are friends & former co-residents from the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Residency Program, who went onto esteemed sports medicine fellowships at The Steadman Clinic and The Rothman Institute, respectively. Dr. Logan practices in Denver, CO, and serves as Head League Physician of the Premier Lacrosse League & as a team physician for U.S. Ski & Snowboard. Dr. Bassett is the director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at the Orthopedic Institute of New Jersey and practices across northern NJ, primarily in Morris and Sussex Counties. Together, they will bring monthly conversations on how to care for athletes of all ages and levels of play, with a healthy mix of cutting-edge science and real-world application.

The Sports Docs Podcast SportsDocsPod

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0 • 14 Ratings

Sports medicine is a constantly evolving field, with hundreds of new articles published each month on the topic. This ever-growing wealth of information can make it challenging to stay updated on the newest approaches and techniques, and to know which data should actually change your practice. Join orthopedic surgeons, Dr. Catherine Logan and Dr. Ashley Bassett, as they chat about the most recent developments in sports medicine and dissect through all the noise. On each episode of The Sports Docs podcast, the hosts will tackle a specific injury – from ACL tears to shoulder instability – and review the top research from various high-impact journals that month, including The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, Sports Health, Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, and more. The Sports Docs will also be joined by experts in the field of sports medicine – orthopedic surgeons, nonoperative sports medicine specialists, athletes, physical therapists, athletic trainers and others – to provide a fresh and well-rounded perspective based on their unique experiences. The Sports Docs – Dr. Logan & Dr. Bassett – are friends & former co-residents from the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Residency Program, who went onto esteemed sports medicine fellowships at The Steadman Clinic and The Rothman Institute, respectively. Dr. Logan practices in Denver, CO, and serves as Head League Physician of the Premier Lacrosse League & as a team physician for U.S. Ski & Snowboard. Dr. Bassett is the director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at the Orthopedic Institute of New Jersey and practices across northern NJ, primarily in Morris and Sussex Counties. Together, they will bring monthly conversations on how to care for athletes of all ages and levels of play, with a healthy mix of cutting-edge science and real-world application.

    Season 2, Episode 6: Dr. Clayton Nuelle on Cartilage Injuries of the Knee (Part II)

    Season 2, Episode 6: Dr. Clayton Nuelle on Cartilage Injuries of the Knee (Part II)

    Welcome to The Sports Docs Podcast with Dr. Catherine Logan and Dr. Ashley Bassett. On each episode we chat about the most recent developments in sports medicine and dissect through all the noise so you know which literature should actually impact your practice.

    On today’s episode we’re focusing on cartilage defects of the knee with Dr. Clayton Nuelle, Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Missouri and team physician for Mizzou athletics. His current research focuses on improving cartilage restoration and joint preservation techniques, so we are very excited to have him join us for our discussion today.

    We have some great articles for you that contribute well to our conversation on the surgical treatment of knee cartilage disease.

    We start with a discussion of osteochondral lesions in the pediatric population. Will Bugbee and his team at Scripps Clinic in California authored a case series titled “Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation of the Knee in the Pediatric and Adolescent Population”. They reported 90% graft survivorship at 10 years post-op. Of the five grafts that failed, four successfully underwent a salvage surgery with another osteochondral allograft. 88% of knees were rated as good to excellent with an 89% satisfaction rate. The authors deemed OCA to be a safe and effective procedure for pediatric patients with large osteochondral defects.

    Then, from the December 2021 issue of Cartilage, we discuss the comprehensive review article by Andreas Gomoll and colleagues titled “Algorithm for Treatment of Focal Cartilage Defects of the Knee: Classic and New Procedures.” This paper nicely details a treatment approach based on cartilage lesion size, location and presence of underlying bone involvement. 

    We finish up our conversation with a focus on rehab and returning to play after cartilage restoration procedures. The last article we reference is a systematic review published in AJSM 2009 titled “Return to Sports Participation After Articular Cartilage Repair in the Knee.” Kai Mithoefer et al reported an overall return to sports rate of 73%, with the highest return rates following OATS. Yet, the highest durability to continue playing at the preinjury level of play was following ACI at 96%. There were numerous factors that impacted an athletes ability to return to sport. Younger patients, those with pure cartilage lesions rather than osteochondral lesions, duration of symptoms less than 12 months pre-op, smaller lesions under 2 cm, lesion location at the lateral femoral condyle, no prior surgeries and no concomitant procedures were all associated with increased return to play.

    • 38 min
    Season 2, Episode 5: Dr. Clayton Nuelle on Cartilage Injuries of the Knee (Part I)

    Season 2, Episode 5: Dr. Clayton Nuelle on Cartilage Injuries of the Knee (Part I)

    Welcome to The Sports Docs Podcast with Dr. Catherine Logan and Dr. Ashley Bassett. On each episode we chat about the most recent developments in sports medicine and dissect through all the noise so you know which literature should actually impact your practice.

    On today’s episode we’re focusing on cartilage defects of the knee with Dr. Clayton Nuelle, Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Missouri and team physician for Mizzou athletics. His current research focuses on improving cartilage restoration and joint preservation techniques, so we are very excited to have him join us for our discussion today.

    We have some great articles for you that contribute well to our conversation on the surgical treatment of knee cartilage disease.

    The first article is a level I prospective RCT published in the May 2018 issue of AJSM titled “Matrix-Applied Characterized Autologous Cultured Chondrocytes Versus Microfracture – Five Year Follow-up of a Prospective Randomized Trial.” This multicenter study was performed at 14 sites across 7 different countries. Patients with symptomatic full thickness cartilage defects greater than 3 cm in size and involving the femoral condyle or trochlea were randomized to either the MACI procedure or microfracture procedure. If you’re not familiar with the MACI procedure, we definitely recommend checking out our last Overtime episode where we do a deep dive into the details of that surgical technique.

    In this 5-year clinical trial, Brittberg and colleagues found that while both groups significantly improved after surgery, patients who underwent the MACI procedure were both clinically and statistically significantly better at 5 years compared to patients who underwent microfracture.

    Then, from the February issue of AJSM this year, we review the publication titled “Isolated Osteochondral Autograft versus Allograft Transplantation for the Treatment of Symptomatic Cartilage Lesions of the Knee.” Bryan Saltzman and his team at OrthoCarolina performed a systematic review of Llevel I and II studies investigating osteochondral transplant techniques. For our listeners, osteochondral transplants can be performed using autograft – the patient’s own tissue, or allograft – donor tissue. Traditionally, autograft transplant or “OATs” has been used for smaller defects, to minimize donor-site morbidity, and has the benefits of avoiding an immune response and no concern for disease transmission.

    The osteochondral graft is typically harvested from nonweightbearing areas of the knee, such as the intercondylar notch or supracondylar ridge. Allograft transplant or “OCA” is indicated for larger defects. Benefits include the lack of donor site morbidity and the ability to take a graft from an area that correlates with the defect being addressed, such as patella to patella. Grafts can also be size-matched during the ordering process. Downsides include having to wait for allograft availability and cost, in addition to the immunologic and disease transmission risks already discussed, though those are very rare. Both techniques have the benefit of addressing not only the cartilage disease but also underlying bone loss. 

    This systematic review concluded that both OATs and OCA resulted in favorable patient outcomes and graft survival rates at 5-year follow up, with no significant differences between the two.  The autograft group was significantly younger, had smaller defect size, used a larger number of plugs and more frequently treated medial femoral condyle lesions. The allograft group had a larger number of patients with lateral femoral condyle and trochlear lesions.

    • 37 min
    OVERTIME with The Sports Docs: Matrix- Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

    OVERTIME with The Sports Docs: Matrix- Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

    Welcome to Overtime with the Sports Docs. On each of these mini episodes, we chat about a new topic or surgical technique in the field of sports medicine. We’ll give you our quick take on the indications, various surgical approaches and overview of the outcomes.

    On today’s episode, we’re going to chat about a relatively new surgical treatment for cartilage injury of the knee called Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation or MACI for short. Now, while this episode will focus primarily on the MACI procedure, we will be releasing a bigger episode in a couple of weeks that goes through all of the different surgical treatments for knee cartilage disease. We’ll be joined by an awesome guest for that one, so be sure to subscribe to our podcast and keep your eyes peeled for that two-part episode coming soon.

    • 23 min
    The Mental Side of Injured Athlete (Part II) with Dr. Melissa Christino

    The Mental Side of Injured Athlete (Part II) with Dr. Melissa Christino

    The psychosocial benefits of participating in sports have long been appreciated. However, athletes are often faced with circumstances that make them susceptible to psychological challenges unique to the athletic population. 

    One such circumstance is injury in sport, which can be a source of notable distress and may precipitate the emergence of new or exacerbation of underlying psychological disorders. In athletes who are injured, particularly those undergoing surgical intervention, psychological factors play a substantial role in the recovery process. A more comprehensive understanding of the complex interplay between psychological and physical health in the setting of an injury is essential to optimize patient care. 

    The aim of this review was to highlight the impact of psychological factors on measurable outcomes after orthopaedic surgical interventions and to explore interventions that can be implemented to improve surgical outcomes and the overall care of injured athletes.

    • 29 min
    The Mental Side of the Injured Athlete (Part I) with Dr. Melissa Christino

    The Mental Side of the Injured Athlete (Part I) with Dr. Melissa Christino

    The psychosocial benefits of participating in sports have long been appreciated. However, athletes are often faced with circumstances that make them susceptible to psychological challenges unique to the athletic population. 

    One such circumstance is injury in sport, which can be a source of notable distress and may precipitate the emergence of new or exacerbation of underlying psychological disorders. In athletes who are injured, particularly those undergoing surgical intervention, psychological factors play a substantial role in the recovery process. A more comprehensive understanding of the complex interplay between psychological and physical health in the setting of an injury is essential to optimize patient care. 

    The aim of this review was to highlight the impact of psychological factors on measurable outcomes after orthopaedic surgical interventions and to explore interventions that can be implemented to improve surgical outcomes and the overall care of injured athletes.

    • 35 min
    OVERTIME with The Sports Docs: Achilles Tendon Injury Management

    OVERTIME with The Sports Docs: Achilles Tendon Injury Management

    Well, we are excited to back for 2022 and kicking off with an Overtime episode. On today’s episode, we’re going to chat about treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures. We’ve seen this injury across many sports and in very prominent players – Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson, Brandon Brooks who tore both of his Achilles tendons one year apart. This can be a devastating injury for our athletes, so understanding the treatment options, post-op rehab and what return to sport looks like is very important.

    We’ll start off with how to decide between non-op treatment and surgical repair and what those treatment protocols look like. Then, we’ll shift our focus to surgical treatment and compare standard open Achilles tendon repair to newer percutaneous repair techniques. After surgical repair, there is then a decision of traditional rehab versus accelerated rehab with early weightbearing. Lastly, we’ll finish up with a discussion on returning to sports after Achilles repair – how do we clear these athletes and how do they perform once they return to play?

    We’re going to reference many articles from AJSM throughout our talk today. We’ll post the abstracts to our Instagram, which is thesportsdocspod – if you don’t already follow us you should! So if you’re interested in reading more about the individual studies you can find them there.

    ·       AJSM 2021 – Seow – Treatment of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Complication Rates With Best- and Worst-Case Analyses for Rerupture Rates
    o   Level I, systematic review, 48 studies
    o   Re-rupture rate: Surgical treatment 3.6%, Non-op 12.1%
    o   Infection: SX 5.6%, non-sx 0%
    o   Sural nerve injury: SX 2%, non-sx 0.3%
    o   DVT/PE: SX 0.8%, non-sx 1.8%
    ·       AJSM 2018 – Svedman – Reduced Time to Surgery Improves Patient-Reported Outcome After Achilles Tendon Rupture. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30169112/

    ·       AJSM 2021 – Attia – Outcomes and Complications of Open Versus Minimally Invasive Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34908499/
    o   Level I, meta-analysis, 10 studies
    ·       AJSM 2021 – Seow – Treatment of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Complication Rates With Best- and Worst-Case Analyses for Rerupture Rates. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33783229/

    ·       AJSM 2020 – Okoroha – Comparison of Tendon Lengthening With Traditional Versus Accelerated Rehabilitation After Achilles Tendon Repair: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32203675/
    ·       AJSM 2018 – Eliasson – The Ruptured Achilles Tendon Elongates for 6 Months After Surgical Repair Regardless of Early or Late Weightbearing in Combination With Ankle Mobilization: A Randomized Clinical Trial. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29965789/

    ·       AJSM 2017 – Trofa – Professional Athletes’ Return to Play And Performance After Operative Repair of a Achilles Tendon Rupture. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28644678/

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
14 Ratings

14 Ratings

MBRU: ,

Episode 5 & 6

What a fun and interesting well done podcast.
Seeing how I’m going in tomorrow for a lateral bucket handle tear operation this podcast came at the perfect time. It was great to just hear some medical terms and procedures from professionals.
I think the talk about post op was the best for someone going in for a procedure. As a patient less than 24 hours away from surgery it was so cool to hear professionals talk about the facts for healing and getting back to activities.
A++++ Thank You

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