650 episodes

A weekly podcast featuring the leading thinkers in business and management.

HBR IdeaCast Harvard Business Review

    • Business
    • 4.7 • 27 Ratings

A weekly podcast featuring the leading thinkers in business and management.

    How Companies Reckon with Past Wrongdoing

    How Companies Reckon with Past Wrongdoing

    Sarah Federman, assistant professor at the University of Baltimore, studies how companies handle their historical misdeeds and what that means for employees and customers. From insurance firms that backed slave owners to railroad companies that transported victims of the Holocaust, many legacy companies can find they played a role in past transgressions. Federman makes a moral and practical argument for uncovering and addressing these misdeeds, even though there may no longer be legal repercussions. And she shares how some leaders have been transparent, apologized, and found meaningful ways to make up for their organization's difficult history. Federman wrote the HBR article “How Companies Can Address Their Historical Transgressions: Lessons from the Slave Trade and the Holocaust.”

    • 22 min
    To Get Ahead, You Need Both Ambition and Humility

    To Get Ahead, You Need Both Ambition and Humility

    We know that great leadership takes not just intelligence and drive but also the ability to get along well with and learn from others. The key, says Amer Kaissi, is to be both ambitious and humble throughout your career. He's studied how people succeed across diverse industries and offers advice of how to find a better balance between our desire to achieve and the qualities that earn more respect from colleagues. Kaissi is a professor of healthcare administration at Trinity University and the author of Humbitious: The Power of Low Ego, High Drive Leadership.

    • 25 min
    We're Bad at Measuring Inequality—Here's Why That Matters

    We're Bad at Measuring Inequality—Here's Why That Matters

    Stefanie Stantcheva, economist at Harvard University, founded the Social Economics Lab to study inequality, our feelings about it, and how policies influence it. She says when we estimate how much money our colleagues make or how much taxes impact us, we are often very far off from the truth. Her research also shows that our misconceptions are often linked to political beliefs. She argues that we need to be more aware of the realities of inequality if we want to create better economic opportunities.

    • 22 min
    Best of IdeaCast: What Sets Successful People Apart

    Best of IdeaCast: What Sets Successful People Apart

    Heidi Grant, a motivational psychologist, has studied successful people and what makes them tick. In this classic episode, she and former host Sarah Green Carmichael discuss the behaviors of high achievers and how to incorporate them into your own life and work. Grant is the author of the HBR article and e-book "Nine Things Successful People Do Differently.”

    • 19 min
    There Still Aren't Enough "Good Jobs”

    There Still Aren't Enough "Good Jobs”

    Companies around the world are struggling to fill open positions, while millions of unemployed people look for work. What's going on? Zeynep Ton, professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, says that organizations need to start offering better jobs. While old-school management thinking argued for paying workers only as much money as the market dictated and squeezing every last bit of efficiency out of them to maximize profits, the 21st century requires a new approach. This starts with higher wages but also includes more predictability and flexibility. In the wake of the global pandemic that brought essential workers to the forefront, Ton explains what companies have done - and can do - to create more good jobs in society.

    • 27 min
    Gaslighting at Work—and What to Do About It

    Gaslighting at Work—and What to Do About It

    Mita Mallick, head of inclusion, equity, and impact at the firm Carta, says gaslighting at the office is more common than many people realize. That's when a manager or coworker engages in behavior where one thing happens, and they try to convince the victim otherwise. Gaslighting can damage the victim’s well-being and performance as well as the company overall. She explains how to recognize the manipulative behavior, what to do about it in the moment, and how companies can respond. Mallick wrote the HBR.org article "How to Intervene When a Manager Is Gaslighting Their Employees."

    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
27 Ratings

27 Ratings

Borntomove ,

Great Bite Size Pieces of Knowledge

Love the HBR Ideacast channel. Sometimes I listen to them multiple times and get something new that I missed before.

A|W ,

Excellent

Excellent resource and knowledge base.

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