222 episodes

A biweekly roundtable by the former editorial team of The Dissolve examining how classic films inspire and inform modern movies. Episodes take a deep dive into a classic film and its legacy in the first half, then compare and contrast that film with a modern successor in the second. Hosted and produced by Genevieve Koski, Keith Phipps, Tasha Robinson and Scott Tobias. Part of the Filmspotting family of podcasts.

The Next Picture Show Filmspotting Network

    • Film History

A biweekly roundtable by the former editorial team of The Dissolve examining how classic films inspire and inform modern movies. Episodes take a deep dive into a classic film and its legacy in the first half, then compare and contrast that film with a modern successor in the second. Hosted and produced by Genevieve Koski, Keith Phipps, Tasha Robinson and Scott Tobias. Part of the Filmspotting family of podcasts.

    #221: Home Sickness, Pt. 1 — Safe (1995)

    #221: Home Sickness, Pt. 1 — Safe (1995)

    We continue our shelter-in-place film series with a pair of films featuring magazine-perfect housewife archetypes struck by mysterious illnesses that are inextricably linked to their oppressive environments: Todd Haynes’ 1995 feature SAFE and Carlo Mirabella-Davis’ debut film SWALLOW. In this half we dig into the many shifting metaphors at play in SAFE, how they reflect both the film’s era and our current moment, and how they’re all held together by Julianne Moore’s remarkable central performance. And what to make of that ending? Is there any sense of optimism or closure to be drawn from Haynes’ film? All that, plus some feedback that uses specific movies as jumping-off points for some big, sprawling questions about film.
    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about SAFE, SWALLOW, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.

    Show Notes
    Works Cited:
    • “Todd Haynes on the unsafe world of Safe,” by Scott Tobias (thedissolve.com)
    • “Safe: Nowhere to Hide,” by Dennis Lim (criterion.com)

    Outro Music: Tom Lehrer, “Pollution”
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 5 min
    #220: Infection Point Pt. 2 - Contagion

    #220: Infection Point Pt. 2 - Contagion

    Steven Soderbergh’s viral thriller CONTAGION may have come out in 2011, but it’s never felt more timely than in the midst of the world’s current coronavirus crisis, which makes it a natural stand-in for the “current film” half of our pairing with Elia Kazan’s 1950 plague noir PANIC IN THE STREETS. Watched today, Soderbergh’s film, a kaleidoscopic treatment of an illness called MEV-1 with a startling 25 percent mortality rate, is both alarming in its prescience and comforting in its diversions from our current reality, a dichotomy we dig into on the way to debating whether it holds together as a film vs. as a scare tactic. Then we bring in PANIC IN THE STREETS to compare the two films’ depictions of the media, their use of time to foster a sense of urgency, and the untold stories playing out in the backgrounds of their high-stakes narratives. Plus, Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your cinematic radar.
    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about PANIC IN THE STREETS, CONTAGION, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.
    Your Next Picture Show
    • Tasha: Andrea Arnold’s AMERICAN HONEY
    • Keith: Takashi Nomura’s A COLT IS MY PASSPORT
    • Scott: Bridget Savage Cole and Danielle Krudy’s BLOW THE MAN DOWN
    • Genevieve: Autumn DeWilde’s EMMA and Amy Heckerling’s CLUELESS

    Outro music: The Police, “Don’t Stand So Close to Me”
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 13 min
    #219: Infection Point Pt. 1 - Panic In the Streets

    #219: Infection Point Pt. 1 - Panic In the Streets

    The 2020 coronavirus outbreak has affected virtually everything about our modern world, including the movies we watch, how we watch them, and how we podcast about them. It’s a sobering but fascinating lens through which to view past films that have wrestled with outbreaks, from Elia Kazan’s 1950 noir PANIC IN THE STREETS up through Steven Soderbergh’s 2011 pandemic procedural CONTAGION. We tackle the first half of that double-feature this week, unpacking the central metaphor — or lack thereof — in Kazan’s crime drama, along with its attitudes toward government and police, its subtle and canny use of locations, and the standout performances from Richard Widmark and a young Jack Palance. Plus, we use our usual feedback segment to check in with each from afar, and see how your Next Picture Podsters are navigating this strange new reality.
    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about PANIC IN THE STREETS, CONTAGION, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.  
    Outro Music: Warren Zevon, “Don’t Let Us Get Sick”
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 1 min
    #218: Believe It Or Not, Pt. 2 - The Invisible Man (2020)

    #218: Believe It Or Not, Pt. 2 - The Invisible Man (2020)

    Leigh Whannell’s new take on H.G. Wells’ 1897 novel THE INVISIBLE MAN is a Blumhouse film, so of course there has to be a twist — and in this case, it’s one that makes this version of INVISIBLE MAN less like the many adaptations that preceded it, and more like George Cukor’s 1944 film GASLIGHT, which is similarly focused on a man’s malicious manipulation of a woman at the expense of her own credibility. In this half of our gaslighting double feature, we talk over what makes this new INVISIBLE MAN work as well as it does — primarily Elisabeth Moss’s stellar central performance — before diving into what the two films share in their portrayals of manipulation, madness, and trauma, and how each uses atmosphere and physical space to to amplify their sense of unease and terror. Plus, Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your cinematic radar.
    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about GASLIGHT, THE INVISIBLE MAN, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. 
    Your Next Picture Show
    • Scott: Jonathan Demme’s RACHEL GETTING MARRIED
    • Tasha: Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia’s THE PLATFORM
    • Keith: William Asher’s NIGHT WARNING, aka BUTCHER, BAKER, NIGHTMARE MAKER
    Outro music: They Might Be Giants, “I Am Invisible”
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 7 min
    #217: Believe It Or Not, Pt. 1 - Gaslight (1944)

    #217: Believe It Or Not, Pt. 1 - Gaslight (1944)

    Leigh Whannell’s new take on THE INVISIBLE MAN comes with a modern twist, one based in a dynamic — a husband pushing his wife toward mental illness for personal gain — that was entrenched in the pop-cultural lexicon thanks in large part to George Cukor’s 1944 film GASLIGHT, starring Ingrid Bergman as a woman whose husband mounts a disinformation campaign against her for insidious purposes. In this half of our gaslighting double feature, we dig into how the film’s direction, design, and fine-tuned performances open up what could have been a very set-bound adaptation of Patrick Hamilton’s 1938 play, and how Cukor’s reputation as a “woman’s director” connects an otherwise varied filmography. Plus, Tasha responds to some pushback against her critiques of PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE in Feedback.
    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about GASLIGHT, THE INVISIBLE MAN, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.
    Outro Music: Dixie Chicks, “Gaslighter”
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr
    #216: Bad Girls Club, Pt. 2 - Birds of Prey (And The Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn)

    #216: Bad Girls Club, Pt. 2 - Birds of Prey (And The Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn)

    Like the landmark 1991 film THELMA & LOUISE, the latest DC comics movie entry, BIRDS OF PREY (AND THE FANTABULOUS EMANCIPATION OF ONE HARLEY QUINN) uses a recognizable form to take its female protagonists to some unfamiliar places. The newer film hasn’t received that same sort of critical acclaim as its predecessor, but some on our panel — which this week once again includes Angelica Jade Bastién of Vulture.com — argue why perhaps it should have, on the way to discussing what the two films share in their attitudes about female emancipation in a man’s world, and in their refreshing depictions of women misbehaving without remorse. Plus, Your Next Picture Show, where we share recent filmgoing experiences in hopes of putting something new on your cinematic radar.
    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THELMA & LOUISE, BIRDS OF PREY, or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730. 

    Show Notes:
    Works Cited
    • “It Doesn’t Take Much to Be Seen As an Unruly Woman,” by Angelica Jade Bastién (Vulture.com)

    Your Next Picture Show
    • Genevieve: Hulu’s HIGH FIDELITY
    • Angelica: Paul Mazursky’s AN UNMARRIED WOMAN
    • Scott: Kitty Green’s THE ASSISTANT
    • Keith: Hong-jin Na’s THE WAILING

    Outro music: June Smollett-Bell, “It’s A Man’s Man’s Man’s World”
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 10 min

Listeners Also Subscribed To