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Technological and digital news from around the world.

Digital Planet BBC

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Technological and digital news from around the world.

    Hacking internet-enabled cars

    Hacking internet-enabled cars

    Hacking internet-enabled cars
    About 40% of cars in the US are connected to the internet. While this enables many useful functions, it also makes them vulnerable to hacks. As all the electronics systems within the car are connected, hackers could take full control of the vehicle. Skanda Vivek tells Gareth how this is possible, and what would happen if a large number of cars were hacked at the same time.

    Covid-19 treatment trials in AI
    It is possible to do drug trials in vitro and in vivo – but what about simulating them? The Cambridge-based company AI VIVO uses machine learning and AI to model diseased cells and their potential treatments. For Covid-19, they screened 90,000 different compounds to find out which drugs could be effective against the virus. Could this be a new way to discover drug treatments? Gareth speaks to David Cleevely to find out how it works.


    Mobile phone rain forecast for farmers
    Farmers with small holdings in developing countries often do not benefit from new technologies, but a tech project in Pakistan has managed to help drastically reduce their water consumption. Farmers receive text messages about when it is going to rain and whether they should irrigate their crops, generating an average of 40% in water savings. Roland Pease has been finding out more.


    The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

    (Image: Traffic jam on multilane road. Credit: iStock / Getty Images Plus)


    Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
    Producer: Alex Mansfield

    • 42 Min.
    Testing EdTech

    Testing EdTech

    Across the globe, learning has been transformed over the last few months, often with the help of specialised tech. More and more educational technology, or EdTech for short, is entering the market. But how do governments, schools, and teachers know which tools and platforms to use? And how do countries with limited resources choose the best tech for their needs? Gareth is joined by Joysy John from NESTA and Susan Nicolai, from the Edtech Hub, to find out.

    Bot or not?
    With so many of us socialising and working online it becomes more important than ever to know whether we are talking to a real person or a computer-generated bot. A study from Carnegie Mellon University showed that 45.5% of users tweeting about coronavirus have bot characteristics. A new Mozilla-funded project called “Bot or Not” invites visitors to take part in a modern-day Turing test. One of the creators, Agnes Cameron, tells us about the project, bots online, and how to spot them.

    Lockdown views
    As many people are forced to stay at home we look at how some are using tech to keep looking out on the world. Many are flocking to online webcams to observe serene nature scenes or unusually empty streets in the tourist hot spots of the world. Jacqui Kenny has long used Google Street View to visit foreign places due to her fear of open spaces. She talks about her new photobook and how machine learning may help her find new images to capture.



    The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with studio commentary by Ghislaine Boddington.


    (Image: Getty Images)


    Studio Manager: Donald McDonald
    Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

    • 43 Min.
    Spain’s many COVID-19 apps

    Spain’s many COVID-19 apps

    In Spain, there are a total of nine COVID-19 tracing apps, but is this too many? Which type is preferable and does there need to be a more coordinated technology across Europe to track COVID-19? Digital Planet reporter Jennifer O’Mahony ask these questions and more on the programme.

    Ovarian cancer and AI
    In the final of our reports from the Cambridge Science Festival, Gareth and Bill meet Dr. Mireia Crispin Ortuzar. She researches AI that analyses radiographic images to help choose and track treatment for ovarian cancer. In the long-term, this type of technology could lead to more personalised medicine in response to cancer and, perhaps, in other fields of medicine as well.

    Robotic Ventilators
    At MIT, a team of scientists and engineers have developed a low-cost, open-source robotic hand that can operate manual ventilators. It could help fill the shortage of mechanical ventilators for Covid-19 patients across the globe, particularly in developing countries. Professor Daniela Rus tells Gareth how this new tech works.


    The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

    Studio Manager: Jackie Margerum

    (Image: Covid-19 tracing. Credit: iStock / Getty Images Plus)


    Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

    • 40 Min.
    Chinese mobile data predicts Covid-19 Spread

    Chinese mobile data predicts Covid-19 Spread

    Using anonymous mobile data, researchers tracked the movement of people from Wuhan to other regions of China and showed that it was possible to predict the spread of the virus throughout the country. Professor Nicholas Christakis, a co-author of the study, shares how it was done and what other countries could learn from it.

    Malawi Solar-Powered Radios
    Malawi could be highly affected by the coronavirus pandemic. In particular rural areas without access to electricity are in need of help. Brave Mhonie, the general manager for the charity Solar Aid in Malawi, tells Gareth about the plan to bring solar powered lights to remote clinics as well as radios to rural communities to spread information about COVID-19.

    Robot Zebra Fish
    In a laboratory in New York, scientists study zebra fish by having them interact with their robot counterparts. Reporter Anand Jagatia went to Tandon School of Engineering to find out how this is done and how robo-fish might be helpful in the future.

    (Photo: Chinese New Year celebrations. Credit: Lintao Zhang/Getty Images)

    The presenter is Gareth Mitchell with studio commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

    Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

    • 44 Min.
    Privacy concerns over contact tracing apps

    Privacy concerns over contact tracing apps

    Contact tracing is an essential part of controlling the Coronavirus pandemic but how should this data be collected and shared? In previous pandemics the tech wasn’t advanced enough to be used widely, but now country by country new contact tracing apps are appearing. But what about our privacy, should our personal health information be so easily available and potentially be unsecure? Some of the tech giants have even developed new protocols to anonymise our data – but not all governments think this will work? Journalist Timandra Harkness tells us what types of apps are being used where and about the tech behind them.

    Making computers intuitive
    Is it possible to make computers intuitive like us? That’s a question that Professor Mateja Jamnik from Cambridge University is trying to answer by building computational models that capture human informal reasoning – essentially trying to humanise computer thinking. Gareth Mitchell and Bill Thompson visited Professor Jamnik in Cambridge before the lockdown.

    Tech to tackle locust storms update
    Gareth speaks to Senior Locust Forecasting Officer Keith Cressman to find out if any of the tech that was being deployed to try and control the locust storms in the Horn of Arica and the Indian Subcontinent is working.

    The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

    The Studio Manager is Duncan Hannant.




    (Image: Covid-19 app on smartphone software in a crowd of people with Bluetooth. Credit: iStock / Getty Images Plus)


    Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

    • 44 Min.
    Could fitness trackers track COVID-19?

    Could fitness trackers track COVID-19?

    Could your smart fitness device detect if you were coming down with respiratory symptoms? A project collecting data from smart wearable devices to see if they can plot outbreaks of disease symptoms by reporting data in real time and giving it a geographical tag has been launched. This would allow local authorities to mount responses quickly before any virus spreads further. The study is called DETECT and one of those involved is Dr. Jennifer Radin an epidemiologist at Scripps Research Translational Institute in San Diego California and she joins us on the programme.

    COVID-19 Cybercrime
    Why are we more susceptible to cybercrime during lockdown? A new report just published by The Global Initiative against Transnational Organized Crime entitled “Cybercrime – Threats during the COVID-19 pandemic” is trying to answer that question. From attacks on hospitals, to a massive rise in the registration of websites with coronavirus, pandemic and COVID-19 in their addresses, the report looks at how our behaviour, our tech and the criminals, have changed in the last few months making cybercrime an even greater threat than before.

    How safe are sex robots?
    Sex robots are increasing in popularity. But as more people around the world bring these increasingly sophisticated androids into their homes, what new risks do they bring with them? As countries across the globe enforce strict lockdowns, many of us have felt the power of technology to counter loneliness and isolation, but how close should we let our tech get? And when technology is so taboo, do important discussions about safety ever see the light of day? Luckily, roboticists and regulators are beginning to grapple with some of these issues. Geoff Marsh has been finding out more…




    (Image: Smartwatch. Credit: iStock / Getty Images Plus)

    The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

    Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

    • 52 Min.

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gadgeeked ,

sehr interessant

interessante themen, sehr empfehlenswert für menschen, die sich für unser digitales zeitalter interesserieren!!!

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