68 episodes

The world’s leading professors explain the latest thinking in the humanities and social sciences in just 10 minutes.

10-Minute Talks The British Academy

    • Society & Culture

The world’s leading professors explain the latest thinking in the humanities and social sciences in just 10 minutes.

    Tragedy and Postcolonial Literature

    Tragedy and Postcolonial Literature

    In this talk, Ato Quayson shares insights drawn from his book Tragedy and Postcolonial Literature. He argues that disputatiousness is one of the starting points that connects Greek and postcolonial tragedy.

    • 14 min
    Hypermasculine leadership

    Hypermasculine leadership

    In this talk, Georgina Waylen discusses hypermasculine leadership within the context of the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    • 11 min
    The politics of humiliation

    The politics of humiliation

    The modern history of humiliation is different from the history of public shaming; both share certain features and practices, but differ as to intentions and goals.

    • 11 min
    Paradoxes of the Roman Arena

    Paradoxes of the Roman Arena

    Kathleen Coleman highlights certain paradoxes at the root of Roman civilisation, specifically those related to the staging of violent displays in the arena. Virtually everything that fueled Roman society can be implicated: ideology, religion, class structure, environment, economy. The Romans, evidently, tolerated these paradoxes. Can we learn anything from them?

    • 12 min
    Public finances and the Union since 1707

    Public finances and the Union since 1707

    In this talk, Julian Hoppit introduces his new book, The Dreadful Monster and its Poor Relations. Taxing, Spending, and the United Kingdom, 1707-2021, which explores the geography of public finances in the United Kingdom over the last three centuries. Why do some places feel they pay too many taxes and get too little public expenditure? Public finances have been at the heart of the making and the unmaking of the United Kingdom, but without much of a clear plan, allowing opposing caricatures of arrangements to become politically powerful.

    • 9 min
    The making of Oliver Cromwell

    The making of Oliver Cromwell

    Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658) is, in terms of sheer achievement, the greatest English commoner of all time and yet remains a deeply controversial figure. He represented himself, apparently compellingly, as an honest, pious, modest, and selfless servant of God and his nation, and yet most of his contemporaries found him ruthless, devious, and self-promoting. In this talk, Ronald Hutton sums up the findings of his latest book, The Making of Oliver Cromwell, which examines his actions and words in full context up until the end of the English Civil War in 1651, and proposes an answer to this apparent paradox.

    • 12 min

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