76 episodes

A podcast about the history of ancient Greece for people new to and familiar with Ancient Greek history.The Casting Through Ancient Greece podcast will focus on telling the story of Ancient Greece starting from the pre history through Archaic Greece, Classical Greece and up to the Hellenistic period. Featured throughout the podcast series will be Major events such as the Greek and Persian wars, The Peloponnesian war and Alexander the Greats war against Persia. www.castingthroughancientgreece.com for more resources and creditsSupport the series at www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreecefacebook: casting through ancient greeceTwitter: @casting_greece

Casting Through Ancient Greece Mark Selleck

    • History
    • 5.0 • 9 Ratings

A podcast about the history of ancient Greece for people new to and familiar with Ancient Greek history.The Casting Through Ancient Greece podcast will focus on telling the story of Ancient Greece starting from the pre history through Archaic Greece, Classical Greece and up to the Hellenistic period. Featured throughout the podcast series will be Major events such as the Greek and Persian wars, The Peloponnesian war and Alexander the Greats war against Persia. www.castingthroughancientgreece.com for more resources and creditsSupport the series at www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreecefacebook: casting through ancient greeceTwitter: @casting_greece

    Teaser: The Tribes of Athens (Patreon)

    Teaser: The Tribes of Athens (Patreon)

    This is a teaser of the bonus episode, The Tribes of Athens found over on Patreon.

    Having spent the last couple of bonus episodes with Sparta, we now turn to Athens to look at the development of their institutions.
    We will first look at a major step forward in the development of democracy with the reforms of Cleisthenes. In this episode we will refresh ourselves with Athens of the late Archaic period and then Cleisthenes' background. We will then touch on some of the political mechanisms he put in place such as ostracism. Then we will turn to his political reorganisation that would see a new system of tribes introduced that would open up political opportunities and allow for a more democratic political system to develop.

    If you would like to hear more and support the series click on the Patreon link at the bottom of the page or you can head to my website to discover other ways to support the series, Here

    New bonus episodes come out in the first week of every month,
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    • 7 min
    Collaboration with Spartan History Podcast

    Collaboration with Spartan History Podcast

    So, it’s now mid-December and I am taking a break over the Christmas period and month of January. Though, before signing off for the holidays I wanted to leave you all with a different sort of episode to see out the year. I decided to contact my good friend Steve over at The Spartan History Podcast to see if he would be interested in coming on just to talk about Greek history. He has just entered into the Greek and Persian War period, so I thought it would provide lots for us to talk about. Plus, it gave me another reason to go back and chat about the Persian Wars, a period I always enjoy talking about. It had also been quite some time since we last did a collaboration so I thought it was about time to get on air and chat. I also felt we had reached a natural point to take a break in the series since we just wrapped up the First Peloponnesian War. But don’t worry we will be back to continue with the developments in the new year.
    For those of you have not come across The Spartan History podcast, I would highly recommend you check out Steve’s show. He began around the same time I started this show and we have since then kept in touch and bounced ideas off one another. You can find the Spartan History podcast on the same platforms you listen to this show on.
    So, for this episode, we decided not to worry about any sort of script or pre-planned direction for the chat, it just basically unfolded as if we were chatting together without any audience. We focus a great deal on the Greco-Persian Wars, jumping around the period a bit. While we also do touch on areas before and after the conflict. We did have a few connection issues through the talk with a dropout and some areas of buffering, though, I did try and smooth them out as best as I could but they are still there. 
    Anyway, a huge thank you to everyone for listening and supporting the show, I have greatly appreciated it. Although, Im taking the rest of December and January off, I just want to let all Patreon members know that I will still be releasing the next bonus episode in the first week of January.

    www.spartanhistorypodcast.com
    Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2oYdMfzDbVzJUrddjpFF6e
    iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/spartan-history-podcast/id1489152895
    Twitter: @Spartan_History
    Facebook: Spartan History Podcast
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    • 1 hr 41 min
    63: Wars End

    63: Wars End

    Athens and Sparta were now in a position to turn their attention to matters within their own spheres of influence, with the truce that existed between them. Sparta would look at eliminating the threats that they had faced on the Peloponnese, seeing Argos now at peace with Sparta, and Tegea brought back into the Peloponnesian league. While negotiations would appear to be taking place with other cities on the Corinthian isthmus.  
    With Sparta now in a more secure position domestically, they would no look further afield once again. This would see them become involved in the second Sacred War around Delphi, with indirect connections to Athens. With the truce still in place Athens would react to these developments once Sparta had left the region. This seeing a reversal in the outcome Sparta had won for the Delphines.
    However, not all was going well for Athens in Boeotia. The oligarchs who had been exiled with Athens take over were returning in great numbers. It appears they may have been emboldened by Sparta’s action. They would begin regaining control of the Boeotian cities and would end up defeating Athens in a decisive battle when the Athenians came to attempt to hold onto the region. Athens would also have to deal with other league members attempting to revolt in the wake of their loss of territory in Boeotia.
    By this stage the 5 years true had just expired and Sparta would immediately make moves against Athens that appear to have been planned. A Spartan army would march into Attica laying waste to the areas before Athens. However, an Athenian army would respond, seeing the Spartans advance no further. All was set for another show down on the battlefield, however talks would be held between to two sides. This would lay the foundation for what is known as the 30 years peace and would bring the First Peloponnesian War to an end.


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    • 36 min
    62: Crisis in the Aegean

    62: Crisis in the Aegean

    After the battle of Tanagra, Athens was able to focus on pursuing its aims throughout Boeotia, the Gulf of Corinth and the Peloponnese. This saw Athens power and influence grow even more at the expense of Sparta and its allies. However, the disaster that would take place in Egypt for Athens would see them now needing to change their policies to better deal with the crisis that was brewing in the Aegean.
    One of the first measures taken was to put in place a truce with Sparta, so as to reduce the threat of attack within Greece itself. This would then allow Athens to focus its now reduced resources to defending its control in the Aegean, this being the source of their power. The defeat in Egypt had seen some of the Delian league members view Athens in a weakened state. While, there was the fear Persia would once again campaign into Aegean.
    Athens would first focus on tightening its grip on the league. They would campaign to force the revolting cities back in as tribute paying members. While then taking measures to ensure it would prove more difficult for future rebellions to take place. These would come in the form of coercion, building relations and economic dependency.
    The other crisis Athens faced in the Aegean was the renewed threat of Persian actions into the Aegean. To deal with this they would arrange an expedition led by Cimon to the Persian controlled island of Cyprus. Although, the island would remain under Persian control the actions that took place would see what appear to be some sort of peace being made between Athens and Persia. Athens had now dealt with the crisis but matters on the Greek mainland had not been resolved and the truce with Sparta was soon due to expire.
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    • 39 min
    61: After Tanagra

    61: After Tanagra

    Sparta had defeated Athens at the battle of Tanagra in 457 BC, though both armies had taken heavy losses. Both would look to make a temporary truce so that they could regroup without the fear of being attacked while in a vulnerable position. This would see the forces of both Athens and Sparta return to their cities bringing a close to this campaign. However, this would not be the end of hostilities and campaigning for the first Peloponnesian war.
    Just 62 days after Tanagra, Athens would launch a fresh attack into Boeotian lands where Sparta had been active, with a possible agreement with Thebes. Sparta would remain within their home territory which would see Athens facing Theban and other Boeotian troops during this new campaign. Athens would win a major victory while also taking many cities, which would see them gain much control and influence within Boeotia.
    This would not be the only campaign launched. A naval campaign would also be arranged which would seem to further Athenian trade connections. There was also an element of gaining some revenge for Tanagra, where Athens would ravage a Spartan port. However, it would appear the main objective would be to establish and secure Athenian trade connections to the west through the Corinthian gulf, dominated by many Peloponnesian league members.
    These campaigns that would unfold and continue through the next couple of years would see Athen’s influence within the Greek mainland increases to new heights. Though, news of the disastrous Egyptian campaign would arrive, seeing Athens having to direct its attention to defending its interests within the Delian league as well as counter the threat of possible hostile Persian moves within the Aegean.
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    • 38 min
    60: Disaster on the Nile

    60: Disaster on the Nile

    Athens was engaging in developing new alliances on the Greek mainland in response to the hostility with Sparta. This would also see a number of campaigns launched by the Athenians to establish their security, these being fought by Sparta’s allies. However, as these events on the mainland were unfolding, a plea for help from a rebel king in Egypt would arrive requesting Athenian assistance in fighting the Persians.
    In 465 BC Xerxes would be assassinated bringing his 21-year rule to an end. This would see his son Artaxerxes come to the throne, though, under suspicious circumstances. The coming to the throne of a new king was usually a period that would see regions attempt to breakaway from the empire. Artaxerxes accession would be no exception, seeing Egypt breakout in revolt, led by a Libyan king named Inaros. It would be he who would request the Athenians come and assist them in their bid for freedom.
    Athens would sail for Egypt and link up with the rebels in the Nile delta, while a Persian army was dispatched to put the revolt down. An initial battle would see the rebel forces rout the Persians, who would seek refuge at Memphis. A siege would now develop as the Athenians and Egyptians attempted to destroy the rest of the Persian forces. This would not be the end of the campaign, with Persia assembling a new army after Persian gold would not entice the Spartans in attacking the Athenians homeland.
    The appearance of this new Persian force in Egypt would now start to see Athens and the rebels fortune change. The siege of Memphis would be broken, the Persians defeating the besieges, this seeing Athens fallback into the Nile delta where they themselves would now be besieged. The majority of the Egyptian rebels would surrender to the Persians, while the Athenian force would be all but destroyed. This seeing the largest disaster suffered by Athens in generations. 
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    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

Stevodeco ,

Everything you ever wanted to know about ancient Greece, all in one place.

This is a great podcast, one of my favourites. The host delivers his information with a style befitting the topic. Taking a look at the broad narrative of ancient Greek culture the show focuses on all of the highlights of the period and delves deeply in the heavily nuanced portions of it. I recommend it highly to anyone looking to refresh their knowledge or to the novitiate who is looking to dip their toe into the rich world of ancient Greece. There is also a fantastic website supporting the podcast that is a great place for reference material and updates on the show. As always, I can't wait for the next episode, thanks Mark.

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