42 episodes

Scholars and witnesses present evidence documenting the mass atrocities that took place from 1933 through to the end of World War II in 1945, giving voice to the memories of the 6 million Jews and 5 million other victims who were murdered throughout Nazi Germany and German-occupied territories under the command of Adolf Hitler.

Holocaust (Audio) UCTV

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 6 Ratings

Scholars and witnesses present evidence documenting the mass atrocities that took place from 1933 through to the end of World War II in 1945, giving voice to the memories of the 6 million Jews and 5 million other victims who were murdered throughout Nazi Germany and German-occupied territories under the command of Adolf Hitler.

    Trauma Memory and the Art of Survival with Gabriella Karin

    Trauma Memory and the Art of Survival with Gabriella Karin

    As a child, Gabriella Karin was separated from her parents and placed in a Slovakian convent for three years. Although physically safe, she did not emerge unscathed. Suppressed memories of her past came flooding back once she began to fashion sculptures related to the Holocaust later in life. Her journey offers important insight into trauma and how creativity can be used as a tool to process memories of oppression, persecution, and loss. Karin is a docent at the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust and participates in the Righteous Conversations Project, which unites survivors and students through art. Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 36071]

    • 59 min
    Transmitted Wounds: Media and the Mediation of Trauma with Amit Pinchevski - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    Transmitted Wounds: Media and the Mediation of Trauma with Amit Pinchevski - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    In his new book, Transmitted Wounds, Amit Pinchevski explores the ways media technology and logic shape the social life of trauma both clinically and culturally. Drawing on a number of case studies such as radio broadcasts of the Eichmann trial, videotapes of Holocaust survivor testimonies, and the recent use of digital platforms for holographic witnessing, he demonstrates how the technological mediation of trauma feeds the traumatic condition itself. His insights have crucial implications for media studies and the digital humanities field as they provide new ways to understand the relationship between technology and human suffering. Pinchevski is an associate professor in the Department of Communication and Journalism at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 35017]

    • 57 min
    Racism in German and American Cinema of the Twenties: From The Ancient Law to The Jazz Singer with Charles Musser - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    Racism in German and American Cinema of the Twenties: From The Ancient Law to The Jazz Singer with Charles Musser - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    Yale University professor and filmmaker Charles Musser explores the historical and contemporary perspectives of race relations in German and American cinema from the 1920s by examining The Ancient Law (1923) and The Jazz Singer (1927). He evaluates how each film addresses anti-Semitism as well as the burning question of the history of blackface as a theatrical convention. Series: "Library Channel" [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Show ID: 35016]

    • 1 hr 15 min
    Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil with Susan Neiman - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil with Susan Neiman - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    As an increasingly polarized America fights over the legacy of racism, Susan Neiman, author of the contemporary philosophical classic Evil in Modern Thought, asks what we can learn from the Germans about confronting the evils of the past. In the wake of white nationalist attacks, the ongoing debate over reparations, and the controversy surrounding Confederate monuments and the contested memories they evoke, Susan Neiman’s Learning from the Germans delivers an urgently needed perspective on how a country can come to terms with its historical wrongdoings. She combines philosophical reflection, personal stories, and interviews with both Americans and Germans who are grappling with the evils of their own national histories. Series: "Writers" [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Show ID: 35015]

    • 54 min
    Shoah: Four Sisters

    Shoah: Four Sisters

    Archivist Regina Longo (Brown University) joins UCSB’s Harold Marcuse (Department of History) for a discussion of Claude Lanzmann’s final film Shoah: Four Sisters (2018), a four-part miniseries that was screened over two days at the Pollock Theater. Longo’s work includes extensive restoration of Claude Lanzmann’s landmark documentary footage of testimonials from the Holocaust, and in conversation with Marcuse she offers deeper insight into the history of the film and the women it concerns. Longo explains how Lanzmann’s Shoah was initially funded and produced, how hundreds of hours of footage is being carefully restored from original prints and made available online, and how Four Sisters both influences and is situated in a legacy of film, legal testimony, memoir, and other post-war efforts to represent the un-representable horror of the Shoah. Series: "Carsey-Wolf Center" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34842]

    • 43 min
    When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    Despite the explosive growth of Holocaust studies, scholars of Nazi Germany and the Shoah long neglected gender as an analytical category. It wasn’t until 1984 when the essay collection When Biology Became Destiny: Women in Weimar and Nazi Germany raised awareness of women’s experiences under fascism. It explored women’s double jeopardy as females and as Jews. In this lecture, Marion Kaplan, one of the editors the publication, takes the audience on a historical tour of her research, from the first workshops raising questions to the first publications providing answers. Since then, the gender perspective has provided significant insight into our understanding of Jewish life in Nazi Germany and during the Holocaust. Kaplan concludes her talk with a forward look at new areas of research that highlight women’s and gender studies. Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34018]

    • 45 min

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4.8 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

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