20 episodes

Let's take a journey - let's jointly venture- into the world of World Citizenship

Jointly Venturing - Let's Talk World Citizenship Oneness World

    • Society & Culture

Let's take a journey - let's jointly venture- into the world of World Citizenship

    Episode 20 - Talking Makes Sense, So Let's Talk More!

    Episode 20 - Talking Makes Sense, So Let's Talk More!

    In today's episode - Episode 20 - we speak to Peter (Pece) Gorgievski who is one of the co-founders of Global Dialogue Foundation (GDF) and Unity in Diversity. GDF is a not-for-profit organisation which works in the field of citizen diplomacy. The foundation's work is based on promoting dialogue across its outlined Sectors and Sub-Sectors and its efforts are focussed on overcoming barriers which exist among people in their hearts, souls and minds. GDF uses dialogue as a tool for improving living conditions and to promote people getting to know each other. In doing so, getting to know planet Earth as a global village and as a collective home for which all will care about. But also, so that peoples ideas, dreams and projects will be focussed towards an improved and inclusive manner of life - building universal brotherhood and a culture of peace, while sustaining the Earth as a unique planet and the only collective home in this reality. In his role as Chairman and CEO, he leads a global network of organisations and individuals who work together to promote dialogue and understanding among people of different cultures and backgrounds. Since 2010, Peter has focussed on bringing people together on an ongoing basis in local communities around the world and establishing projects which support the integration of all peoples with mainstream society, while each maintains their own unique cultural identity and heritage. Peter has travelled the world presenting the Unity in Diversity project, and has been working in collaboration with the UN Alliance of Civilizations since GDF’s inception. He shares his passion for contributing to building a world based on inclusive societies and a culture of peace. Peter is also a director of a private company based in Australia involved in import and distribution. He is married and has 3 children, aged 21, 19 and 16.

    And in case you were wondering, Peter sold everything he owned - a house, savings and most material possessions to get GDF off the ground in 2010. How's that for personal commitment to build a better world? How much would you be willing to give up to create the better world we all deserve? Enjoy and stay in touch!

    • 55 min
    Episode 19 - Can We Still Really Justify Tax Havens?

    Episode 19 - Can We Still Really Justify Tax Havens?

    Today we are talking with international tax lawyer Dino Faronato about the exciting issue of tax and tax havens. How is it that ordinary middle class taxpayers commonly pay a far higher percentage of personal income tax than many of the world's biggest corporations? Why, despite some new restrictions, are tax havens allowed to flourish across the world and holding some 8% of all household wealth, often out of reach of the world's tax authorities. Can we imagine a different world whereby tax matters became truly global in nature? Is it realistic to imagine a system where tax havens no longer existed and all taxable income was actually taxed at a reasonable rate bringing in trillions of additional revenues to tackle some of the world's most intractable social problems? Might we ponder the establishment of a new global social fund that enable every single human being to contribute some small amount into a worldwide fund dedicated to improving slums across the world? These and other issues are addressed in Jointly Venturing Episode 19. Let us know what you think - info@onenessworld.org.

    • 52 min
    Episode 18 - If you think you understand the Middle East, think again!

    Episode 18 - If you think you understand the Middle East, think again!

    In today's podcast, we are on the line with Beirut, speaking with Middle East expert Omar Abdulaziz Hallaj. Having lived most of his life in Aleppo, Syria, Aziz brings an extraordinary degree of insight and analysis to the history of the world's most unstable region, what has caused these multiple crises and what the future may hold; and the news is not good. If regional solutions for the simultaneous crises of ongoing conflict, growing poverty, persistent drought and climate change and even looming famine are not found soon, the changes brought about by the Arab Spring beginning in 2011 will pale in comparison in terms of regional instability. In Episode 18 we also explore how the features and foundations of world citizenship can provide the basis for a very different - and better - future for all the people in the Middle East and beyond.

    OMAR ABDULAZIZ HALLAJ is a consultant on urban planning, development and local governance. He is co-founder and advisor for the Syria Project at the Common Space Initiative in Beirut, where he is engaged in facilitating various dialogue and research projects for peace building and recovery planning in Syria. His professional and published research covers institutional, financial and political aspect of the urban built environment; housing, land and property (HLP); and the war economy. Formerly, he was the CEO of the Syria Trust for Development, and served on the boards of several NGO’s, and public commissions. In 2007, Mr. Hallaj was the recipient of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture as team leader of the Shibam Urban Development Project (GIZ). He subsequently served on the master jury and the steering committee of the Award.

    • 1 hr 20 min
    Episode 17 - Planet Slum or Planet Love - it's our choice!

    Episode 17 - Planet Slum or Planet Love - it's our choice!

    As Australian bushfires continue to rage, in Episode 17 Scott talks with Monash University law professor Daniel Fitzpatrick about the state of our 'planet of slums', how we got here and where we might turn to build the structures needed to bring about the Planet Love we all surely wish for. We cover everything from the colonial background of today's property law, how climate change is going from bad to worse and end by discussing a vision of world far fairer, far more peaceful and kind than where we find ourselves today. Enjoy listening and join us again next week when we talk world citizenship with Syrian refugee Aziz Hallaj from Aleppo. Wherever you are - have fun jointly venturing!

    • 53 min
    Episode 16 - Land up for Grabs in Myanmar - How to bring land justice to the people of Myanmar.

    Episode 16 - Land up for Grabs in Myanmar - How to bring land justice to the people of Myanmar.

    Today's podcast addresses the question of land in Myanmar - Whose land belongs to whom? How safe is land against land grabbing? And what - after the recent involvement of both the International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court - should be done to ensure the housing, land and property rights that belong to everyone in Myanmar?

    Much of today's discussion focuses on the incredible ease by which the powers that be are allowed, and indeed, facilitated by law, to grab land from ordinary people in the country. In all countries, the act of compulsorily acquiring land is highly regulated and something which rights-respecting governments are often reluctant to invoke except in exceptional circumstances when all other viable alternatives have been pursued. In general terms, the housing, land and property rights of affected persons and communities are often at the centre of proposed projects involving land acquisition and project evaluation processes, and active efforts are often undertaken by the relevant state authorities to avoid acquisition and resultant resettlement if at all possible, and when no other option exists, to ensure the full protection of relevant human rights norms. As this episode reveals, such points of view - even with the recent adoption in May 2019 of a new Land Acquisition, Resettlement and Rehabilitation Law - are almost entirely absent from the both the legal framework and practice of those engaging in the massive land confiscation epoch through which Myanmar is now passing and which it has experienced for decades.

    Indeed, if anything, measures to ensure that land confiscation in Myanmar is not carried out are almost universally absent when land is sought by others than those owning it, working it or residing upon it. Within the country, in fact, every act of land confiscation, acquisition, grabbing and expropriation in Myanmar can be assessed against what is allowed under international law and in the overwhelming majority of cases - including those that have taken place subsequent to the so-called political reform process underway since 2011, and following the 2015 win by the National League for Democracy - are structurally inconsistent with the norms expected of a country that has ratified human rights treaties protecting basic HLP rights. As we discuss, a recent report finds that the vast majority of all acts of land grabbing (including those acts of confiscation carried out under the Land Acquisition Act (1894), recently replaced by a new, but certainly not dramatically improved, land acquisition law) violate basic international norms governing these matters, and many constitute internationally wrongful acts.

    Episode 16 begins with an examination of how land confiscation takes place in the country, the scale of the practice, the methods used, who actually benefits from these practices, and how the legal system of Myanmar actually promotes what are, inter alia, illegal acts under international law. For the remainder of the discussion, we outline a legal roadmap of constructive, specific and actionable recommendations designed to build an entirely new vision of housing, land and property rights in the country which is fundamentally different from how these issues are treated today in contemporary Myanmar.

    • 1 hr 36 min
    Episode 15 - YOU Can Help Change the World Today! Solving Climate Displacement in Bangladesh

    Episode 15 - YOU Can Help Change the World Today! Solving Climate Displacement in Bangladesh

    Today's episode of Jointly Venturing is about how YOU can help change the world today by supporting a project to provide free, permanent housing to some of Bangladesh's most vulnerable families who have been displaced by climate change. In this episode we speak with Arif Rahman and Mohammed Shahjahan of Young Power in Social Action (YPSA) from Chittagong, Bangladesh about their work with the One House, One Family at a time project (OHOF) which provides homes for some of the country's most disadvantaged families from southeastern Bangladesh. In collaboration with Displacement Solutions, OHOF has raised funds from private individuals over the past two years sufficient to construct eight new homes. In 2020, a third phase of OHOF will take effect during which time funds will be sought to build a further 12 homes by the end of the year. Former UNHCR official Brian Gorlick also appears in Episode 15. Brian recently visited the first homes built by OHOF and spoke extensively with the families now residing there. If you would like to participate directly in solving climate displacement in Bangladesh through the OHOF project, please feel free to write us at either info@onenessworld.org or info@displacementsolutions.org and we will explain how to deposit your contribution into the OHOF account, 100% of which we go to Bangladesh to construct new homes during phase 3 of the project. We are also, of course, happy to answer any questions you may have about OHOF. If we all work together, we can solve climate displacement, so let's get started!

    • 1 hr 6 min

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