109 episodes

SSEAC Stories is a podcast series produced by the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre at the University of Sydney. Experts join us in every episode to explore the latest research and share their insights on a wide range of topics pertaining to Southeast Asia.Visit our website for more information or to browse additional resources: sydney.edu.au/sseac.

SSEAC Stories Sydney Southeast Asia Centre

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    • 5.0 • 10 Ratings

SSEAC Stories is a podcast series produced by the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre at the University of Sydney. Experts join us in every episode to explore the latest research and share their insights on a wide range of topics pertaining to Southeast Asia.Visit our website for more information or to browse additional resources: sydney.edu.au/sseac.

    HouseMate: Lessons from Singapore on How to Provide Universal Cheap Homeownership

    HouseMate: Lessons from Singapore on How to Provide Universal Cheap Homeownership

    While Australia prides itself on being an egalitarian society, and owning a detached house on fenced block of land plays a much-revered role in the Great Australian Dream, in practice, home ownership remains a luxury afforded to the few. As skyrocketing house prices have gradually locked millions out of the Australian real estate market, economist Dr Cameron Murray turned to our neighbour Singapore to find a solution to the housing affordability crisis.
    Joining Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories, Dr Cameron Murray reveals how the small Southeast Asian island-state can teach Australia some valuable lessons on universal cheap home ownership. Inspired by Singapore’s successful policies to boost home ownership for 25-34-year-olds from 60 to nearly 90 per cent over the past four decades, he proposes a similar scheme, called HouseMate, that aims to offer home ownership to any eligible buyer who doesn't already own property, at a discounted price.
    About Cameron Murray:
    Dr Cameron Murray is a Research Fellow in the Henry Halloran Trust at the University of Sydney with a research focus on housing economics and corruption. He is the co-author of the book Game of Mates: How favours bleed the nation, and a regular media commentator on Australian economic policy.
    For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre’s website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac.

    • 20 min
    All Industry is Creative Industry: New Creativity and Innovation Practices in Vietnam

    All Industry is Creative Industry: New Creativity and Innovation Practices in Vietnam

    Recent economic development in Vietnam has seen a proliferation of manufacturing. At the same time, Vietnam has embraced creative innovation as part of its move towards the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Throughout the country, new creativity and innovation practices are emerging. These practices provide a creative outlet, but also connect to bigger themes around industry, wellbeing, productivity, and climate change.
    Joining Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories, Associate Professor Jane Gavan untangles some of these threads, explaining the relationship between creativity and manufacturing, and reflecting on sustainable, innovative ways of raising productivity and valuing creativity in Vietnam.
    About Jane Gavan:
    Associate Professor Jane Gavan is an artist-researcher who curates in-country collaborations between creative practitioners and organisations. Jane’s research seeks to offer opportunities for sustainable, innovative ways of raising productivity and valuing creativity in Vietnam. Her recent major exhibition, Manufacturing Creativity at the Museum of Ho Chi Minh City, was supported by UNESCO and the Vietnam Institute of Culture and Arts Studies. Through this work, Jane develops new access to materials, processes, and audiences for creative practitioners, and builds sustainable socially responsible innovation in firms. Jane is based at the Sydney College of the Arts, in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Sydney, teaching across all levels. Jane also leads workshops for the FASS capstone Interdisciplinary Impact and advises on the School of Business Master of Commerce Creativity and Data unit. Jane is on the Executive of the Sydney Vietnam Initiative.
    Interview References: Jane mentioned the Vietnam Labor research work of Do Quynh Chi - Director - Research Centre for Employment in Hanoi, all other artists and organizations can be found on the Manufacturing Creativity website.
    For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre’s website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac.

    • 19 min
    Boys Love and Japanese Queer Popular Culture across Southeast Asia

    Boys Love and Japanese Queer Popular Culture across Southeast Asia

    Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, consumers across East and Southeast Asia have found themselves turning to Thai soap operas known as “Boys Love series” as a source of comfort and joy. Originally deriving from Japanese comic book culture, Boys Love, or BL, represents just one of many instances where the queer popular culture of Japan has transformed sexual culture in Southeast Asia through the development of new expressions of gender and sexuality.
    Joining Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories, Dr Thomas Baudinette shines the spotlight on the influence of Japanese queer popular across Southeast Asia, highlighting how, across the region, young consumers – most prominently from sexual minority communities – have been turning away from Western media to draw upon Japanese popular culture in the ongoing search for affirmative representation and tools to not only make sense of their minoritised sexualities, but to also advocate for their emancipation.
    About Tom Baudinette:
    Dr Thomas Baudinette is Senior Lecturer in Japanese and International Studies, Department of Media, Communication, Creative Arts, Language, and Literature at Macquarie University. Thomas’s scholarly research focuses upon the role of Asian popular culture in informing knowledge about gender and sexuality across East and Southeast Asia. His first book is Regimes of Desire: Young Gay Men, Media, and Masculinity in Tokyo (University of Michigan Press, 2021). His second book is Boys Love Media in Thailand: Celebrity, Fans, and Transnational Asian Queer Popular Culture (Bloomsbury, forthcoming).
    For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre’s website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac.

    • 23 min
    Geopolitics in the Mekong Region: The Role of Chinese Energy Politics in Laos and Cambodia

    Geopolitics in the Mekong Region: The Role of Chinese Energy Politics in Laos and Cambodia

    Energy, and who controls it, has emerged as a major issue in Southeast Asia in recent years. Nowhere is this issue more evident than in the Mekong region, where China’s influence on the politics of energy has been steadily on the rise under the umbrella of its Belt and Road Initiative. China’s investments have supported Cambodia in being able to meet its increasing domestic energy demand, and are also helping Laos to fulfil its vision of becoming the ‘battery of Asia’. Meanwhile, renewed US commitment and additional funding to the Mekong region has been welcomed. Nevetheless, whether that translates into viable alternatives to Beijing’s massive trade and investment, and growing influence, remains to be seen.
    Joining Dr Natali Pearson on SSEAC Stories, Dr Andrea Haefner unpacks the role of Chinese energy politics in Laos and Cambodia, and reflects on the impact of the recent economic downturn caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.
    About Andrea Haefner:
    Dr Andrea Haefner is a Lecturer at the Griffith Asia Institute and has over 15 years of experience working with academia, government, and international organisations across Australia, Germany, and Southeast Asia, especially the Mekong region where she lived and worked for four years in Laos. Andrea's research focuses on transboundary river basin, geopolitics, and governing civil society in the Mekong region. Besides publishing several peer-reviewed articles, Andrea's book on Negotiating for Water Resources - Bridging Transboundary River Basins was published with Routledge in 2016. In addition to focusing on impact research and policy relevance, Andrea also works on several projects on the ground and regularly leads capacity building programs. In 2021, Andrea received the ABDC Award for Innovation and Excellence in International Education.
    For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre’s website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac.

    • 22 min
    The Politics of Ethnic Integration in Thailand

    The Politics of Ethnic Integration in Thailand

    Following the 2014 coup in Thailand, in which the Thai military overthrew the caretaker government after 6 months of political crisis, major media outlets suggested that the coup could lead to ethnic tensions—and potentially civil war—between the Isan people of northeastern Thailand and the central Thai government. While this civil war never eventuated, there were genuine tensions between the Isan people and the Thai state.
    In this episode, Dr Natali Pearson is joined by Associate Professor Jacob Ricks, to discuss why these tensions never escalated into full blown conflict as predicted. Is this a sign that Thailand’s centuries-long effort to integrate diverse ethnic identities has been a success, and what cautionary tales might apply?
    About Jacob Ricks:
    Jacob Ricks is Associate Professor of Political Science in the School of Social Sciences at Singapore Management University. He researches development topics as well as nationalism and ethnicity in Southeast Asia, with a focus on Thailand and Indonesia. Recently he has been studying the identity of the Isan people of Northeastern Thailand. He is co-author of the book Ethnicity and Politics in Southeast Asia with Amy Liu. His research has also been published in journals like World Development, Political Behavior, Pacific Affairs, and Journal of Contemporary Asia, among others.
    For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre’s website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac.

    • 21 min
    Greater Angkor and Global Urbanism

    Greater Angkor and Global Urbanism

    Cambodia is home to Angkor, one of the most important archaeological sites of Southeast Asia. Greater Angkor, the capital of the Khmer Empire, was a low-density city covered about a 1000 sq km and was the home of between 750,000 to 900,000 people in the 12th century CE. The urban complex was largely abandoned in the 14th and 15th centuries. Its central 300 sq km is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and includes the world-famous temple of Angkor Wat, one of humankind’s largest religious monuments which has continued in use to the present day.
    In this episode, world-renowned archaeologist Professor Roland Fletcher joins Dr Natali Pearson to examine the structure of Angkor’s social and spatial organisation; the way the urban complex operated in its environment. Reflecting on the metropolis’ demise, Roland argues that archaeological study of Angkor can teach us lessons about the vulnerability of modern-day urbanism in a time of increasing climate risk.
    About Roland Fletcher:
    Roland Fletcher is Professor of Theoretical and World Archaeology at the University of Sydney. Roland is also Director of the Greater Angkor Project – a collaboration between the University of Sydney, the Authority for the Protection of the Site and Management of the Region of Angkor (APSARA) in Cambodia, and the École française d'Extrême-Orient (EFEO), that has been ongoing since 1998. He is the author of The Limits of Settlement Growth, published by Cambridge University Press in 1995, and has published extensively on urbanism.
    For more information or to browse additional resources, visit the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre’s website: www.sydney.edu.au/sseac.

    • 24 min

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Shellsiee ,

Unique and engaging

Absolutely fascinating areas of research made accessible to us by passionate and engaging people. Thank you!

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Refreshing mix

I am really enjoying listening to the stories of researchers from such a wide range of disciplines.

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Very interesting

An excellent collection of podcasts on a range of interesting topics. I am really enjoying listening to these.

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