77 episodes

The Anthill is a show for curious minds, with a mix of everything from science, history and psychology to politics and economics. In each of our series, we unearth new stories from the world of academia, bringing you new and cutting edge research on the big issues of the day. Our latest series, out on November 16 2022, is Uncharted Brain: decoding dementia, which explores new research unlocking clues to the ongoing mystery of how dementia works in the brain. The Anthill is produced by The Conversation, a not-for-profit media organisation.
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    • 4.7 • 27 Ratings

The Anthill is a show for curious minds, with a mix of everything from science, history and psychology to politics and economics. In each of our series, we unearth new stories from the world of academia, bringing you new and cutting edge research on the big issues of the day. Our latest series, out on November 16 2022, is Uncharted Brain: decoding dementia, which explores new research unlocking clues to the ongoing mystery of how dementia works in the brain. The Anthill is produced by The Conversation, a not-for-profit media organisation.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Uncharted Brain 3: the role viruses may play in Alzheimer’s

    Uncharted Brain 3: the role viruses may play in Alzheimer’s

    There are many competing theories about what causes Alzheimer's disease. For more than 30 years, Ruth Itzhaki has been accumulating evidence that viruses are involved in its development in the brain. We investigate this evidence in the third and final episode of Uncharted Brain: Decoding Dementia, hosted by Paul Keaveny and Gemma Ware from The Conversation.
    Featuring interviews with Ruth Itzhaki, professor emeritus of molecular neurobiology at the University of Manchester in the UK, Dana Cairns, a postdoctoral research fellow at Tufts University in the US and Davangere P. Devanand, director of geriatric psychiatry and professor of psychiatry and neurology, Columbia University Medical Center in the US.
    Uncharted Brain is produced by Tiffany Cassidy with sound design by Eloise Stevens. The executive producer is Gemma Ware. Read full credits here.
    Further reading:
    My work investigating the links between viruses and Alzheimer’s disease was dismissed for years – but now the evidence is building

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    • 27 min
    Uncharted Brain 2 : the family trauma of dementia from sports injuries

    Uncharted Brain 2 : the family trauma of dementia from sports injuries

    Dementia doesn’t just affect older people. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a form of dementia that athletes from a whole range of sports can develop. It’s now at the centre of a number of legal challenges involving sports from rugby to American football. In the second episode of Uncharted Brain: Decoding Dementia, hosts Gemma Ware and Paul Keaveny from The Conversation find out about the toll this type of dementia can take on family members, who are often unaware of what’s happening to their loved ones.
    This episode features interviews with Matthew Smith, a senior lecturer in sport and exercise psychology at the University of Winchester in the UK and Lisa McHale, director of family relations at the Concussion Legacy Foundation.
    Uncharted Brain is produced by Tiffany Cassidy with sound design by Eloise Stevens. The executive producer is Gemma Ware. Read full credits here.
    Further reading:
    Sport-induced traumatic brain injury: families reveal the ‘hell’ of living with the condition

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    • 24 min
    Uncharted Brain 1: a lifelong study unlocks clues to Alzheimer’s

    Uncharted Brain 1: a lifelong study unlocks clues to Alzheimer’s

    Scientists have been doing an array of regular health checks on the same group of people since they were born in 1946 – the world's longest running cohort study. Now the brains of some of its participants are revealing new insights into the risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. 
    We find out more in the first episode of Uncharted Brain: Decoding Dementia, a new series from The Anthill hosted by Paul Keaveny and Gemma Ware from The Conversation.
    This episode features Marcus Richards, professor of psychology in epidemiology, UCL, Jonathan Schott, professor of neurology at UCL and David Ward, one of the cohort study participants.
    Uncharted Brain is produced by Tiffany Cassidy with sound design by Eloise Stevens. The executive producer is Gemma Ware. Read full credits here.
    Further reading:
    We’ve been studying the same people for 76 years – this is what we’ve found out about Alzheimer’s disease
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    • 29 min
    Uncharted Brain: decoding dementia – trailer

    Uncharted Brain: decoding dementia – trailer

    Uncharted Brain: decoding dementia is a new series from The Conversation exploring new research unlocking clues to the ongoing mystery of how dementia works in the brain.
    In this three-part series, hosted by journalists Paul Keaveny and Gemma Ware from The Conversation, we'll delve into some of the findings from the world's longest continuously running cohort study, hear about the trauma of families effected by dementia and explore one researcher's investigation into the role certain viruses could play in Alzheimer's disease.
    All episodes will be available via The Anthill on November 16.
    Uncharted Brain is produced by Tiffany Cassidy with sound design by Eloise Stevens. The executive producer is Gemma Ware.

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    • 2 min
    Climate Fight part 5: the art and chaos of negotiating the Glasgow Climate Pact

    Climate Fight part 5: the art and chaos of negotiating the Glasgow Climate Pact

    A good negotiation is supposed to leave everyone feeling a little unsatisfied. So what happened at the world's biggest one – over the future of our planet? In part five, and our final episode of Climate fight: the world’s biggest negotiations, host Jack Marley reports from Glasgow where he spoke to academics who have been researching the UN climate negotiations for decades, and the people representing their countries in the talks. 
    Featuring Abhinay Muthoo, professor of economics at the University of Warwick in the UK; François Gemenne, director of the Hugo Observatory at the University of Liège in Belgium, and Lisa Vanhala, professor of political science at UCL in the UK. And Hadeel Hisham Ikhmais, a climate negotiator from Palestine.
    The Climate Fight podcast series is produced by Tiffany Cassidy. Sound design is by Eloise Stevens and our series theme tune is by Neeta Sarl. The series editor is Gemma Ware. You can sign up to The Conversation’s free daily email here. A transcript of this episode will be available soon.
    Climate fight: the world’s biggest negotiation is a podcast series supported by UK Research and Innovation, the UK’s largest public funder of research and innovation.
    Further reading
    Five things you need to know about the Glasgow Climate Pact, by Simon Lewis, UCL and Mark Maslin, UCLThe world has made more progress on climate change than you might think – or might have predicted a decade ago, by Myles Allen, University of OxfordCOP26 deal: how rich countries failed to meet their obligations to the rest of the world, by Lisa Vanhala, UCLCoal: why China and India aren’t the climate villains of COP26, by Daniel Parsons and Martin Taylor, University of Hull
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    • 44 min
    Climate Fight part 4: the youth movement grows up

    Climate Fight part 4: the youth movement grows up

    Locked out of conferences and company boardrooms, young people have tried to influence the international response to the climate crisis with strikes and protests. In part four of Climate Fight, the world's biggest negotiation, we explore what effect this youth activism has, and where the movement will go next.
    Featuring Harriet Thew, researcher in climate change governance at the University of Leeds, who speaks to youth climate activist Abel Harvie-Clark about his experiences. And Lynda Dunlop, a senior lecturer in science education at the University of York.
    The Climate Fight podcast series is produced by Tiffany Cassidy. Sound design is by Eloise Stevens and our series theme tune is by Neeta Sarl. The series editor is Gemma Ware. You can sign up to The Conversation’s free daily email here. A transcript of this episode is available here.
    Climate fight: the world’s biggest negotiation is a podcast series supported by UK Research and Innovation, the UK’s largest public funder of research and innovation.
    Further reading
    Environmental action: why some young people want an alternative to protests, by Lynda Dunlop, Lucy Atkinson and Maria Turkenburg-van Diepen, University of YorkYoung climate activists have far more power than they realise, by Anna Pigott, Swansea UniversityHow the youth climate movement is influencing the green recovery from COVID-19 , by Jens Marquardt, Stockholm UniversityClimate crisis: how states may be held responsible for impact on children, by Aoife Daly, University College Cork
    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
27 Ratings

27 Ratings

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