22 episodes

A podcast exploring how idioms connect us with the past and to each other.

The Expressionists Olivia Rosenman and Helen Rydstrand

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7, 22 Ratings

A podcast exploring how idioms connect us with the past and to each other.

    Tea ladies

    Tea ladies

    It's tea for two and two for tea on the last Expressionists episode for season 2. Yes, we're talking idioms relating to the world's most consumed beverage, so put the kettle on, pour yourself a comforting cuppa and listen in. We promise you it's relevant to the price of tea in China.

    • 24 min
    Cop an earful

    Cop an earful

    We all try to get along most of the time, but everyone needs some good insults up their sleeve, and there's nothing that adds insult to injury like an idiom. Join us for an ugly, mud-slinging instalment of the Expressionists. 

    • 21 min
    Legwork

    Legwork

    Humans have been walking upright for at least six million years, and that's more than enough time to come up with an idiom or two about Shank's pony. So take a hike with the Expressionists as they ramble along with walking idioms in this far from pedestrian episode. 

    • 20 min
    Always was, always will be

    Always was, always will be

    We're marking this January 26 by exploring and celebrating indigenous Australian languages and cultures. We speak to two knowledgable and passionate advocates for the revitalisation of these languages: Professor Jakelin Troy, author of The Sydney Language, and Daniel Browning, producer of ABC Radio National's Word Up podcast.

    • 29 min
    Kick-off

    Kick-off

    What better way to kick off a World Cup year than with an episode on idioms relating to the beautiful game? Join us to discover the surprising connections between soccer, literary style, the history of radio, and politics, in this special collaboration with By Association podcast.

    • 28 min
    Sneak peek: What's in a name?

    Sneak peek: What's in a name?

    In our first episode for 2018, we joined forces with James Parkinson of the excellent By Association podcast, to talk about idioms relating to the footiest of the footballs: soccer. In this sneak peek James gets the ball rolling by enlightening us on the origins and usage of the term 'soccer' itself. Listen now, then tune in to the full episode - out this Friday.

    • 5 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

Rosie Rosie Rose ,

cats v dogs

This podcast continues to be informative and entertaining. Hard to do and harder to sustain so excellent work.

Keith Duddy ,

Don't have Twitter, Hate Facebook... so I'm writing to you here

Hi Olivia and Helen,

Great work! (as my iTunes review says)...

I am a bit of a stick in the mud about the invasion of American idiom into the rest of the Anglosphere! So I wondered if you'd find out for me what the derivation of one of my most hated Americanisms "from the get go" is. I even heard a BBC presenter say it the other day in a very RP accent, and had to wonder how it would make it even into the hallowed halls of the Queen's English.

There are a bunch of Americanisms that have become all pervasive: "Step up to the plate" was one I heard in reference to a Rugby League player not doing his job properly the other day.... ridiculous IMO to use a baseball idiom for another sport. I'm sure you can use your extensive knowledge of American idiom, and trace when it started being adopted by Aussies and other English speakers, as the source for an episode.

Oh - and my other least favourite morphing of an idiom over the last decade or two is the perversion of "The proof of the pudding is in the eating" meaning that you have to "taste" the result at the end of a process to work out if it was worthwhile, versus the newer, almost pervasive version: "The proof is in the pudding" - meaning almost nothing, as far as I can determine.

Best regards,
Keith Duddy

MrAkimbo10 ,

Awesome Podcast

Interesting subjects, well presented and catchy theme music :P

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