62 episodes

(Formerly Rescope Radio) Hear from high profile and grass-roots leaders everywhere, going about the regeneration of life on this planet. We're sharing the stories. We're changing the stories - the stories we live by. And the systems we create in their mould.

The RegenNarration The RegenNarration

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8, 18 Ratings

(Formerly Rescope Radio) Hear from high profile and grass-roots leaders everywhere, going about the regeneration of life on this planet. We're sharing the stories. We're changing the stories - the stories we live by. And the systems we create in their mould.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
18 Ratings

18 Ratings

thorhammer24 ,

Great thought fodder

I love that you're doing this, using language that has been decried as too emotive to employ around economics, interviewing innovative thinkers and really advocating a new way of being in our society. Thanks, team.

tjtjw ,

Ten years observations on Cheela Plains

I first visited Cheela Plains just before Evan began the regenerative grazing. My impression was that the Plains pretty much looked like a 20,000 ha graded road.
I returned each year for the next decade. Every year the country looked better. In the first couple of years the bare ground became covered in a mulch of dry grass. The perennial grass density increased each year, as did the diversity of grass species. Buffel grass was the first to take off as it is a true pioneer species (ie what is called a weed by the those that don’t understand ecology and the science of plant community succession).
Once the buffel had started to do its job of restoring soil fertility the good native perennials such Mitchell grass started to reappear. As well as the perennial grass the native woody shrubs also regenerated.
I think one of the very big changes that occurred was the cooling of the landscape. Bare soil reaches 65C in the afternoon for most of the year in the Pilbara. The dry grass mulch Evan recreated using his stock dropped the maximum soil temperature back to 50C, but under live perennial grass the soil max temp is only 35C. Ie a 30C reduction over a significant proportion of the landscape.
At 65C soil microbes are cooked and thus soil fertility is lost. At 35C microbes thrive. I suspect this is one of the key factors behind the miraculous regeneration that I have seen with my own eyes.
The bit that many people can not accept is that this landscape scale regeneration has occurred not despite of cattle, but because of cattle under Evan and Robyn’s management.

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