40 episodes

The Research Her is a podcast that explores research relevant to wellness. By discussing relatable topics each week, we promote the improvement of health disparities faced by women of color through education and research facilitation. Host Elissia Franklin is a black woman in science who shares woes and rewards while learning about holistic health and highlighting women of color in research. Come learn with us!

The Research Her Dr. Elissia Tenea

    • Science

The Research Her is a podcast that explores research relevant to wellness. By discussing relatable topics each week, we promote the improvement of health disparities faced by women of color through education and research facilitation. Host Elissia Franklin is a black woman in science who shares woes and rewards while learning about holistic health and highlighting women of color in research. Come learn with us!

    The Science of Wet A** Pu$%y SWAP feat. Dr. Jasmine Abrams, Portia Brown and Dr. Ruth Arumala

    The Science of Wet A** Pu$%y SWAP feat. Dr. Jasmine Abrams, Portia Brown and Dr. Ruth Arumala

    Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion broke the internet and climbed up all the charts with the release of their new song WAP, which is an acronym for Wet Ass Pussy. Her we use the term SWAP, not only because we swapped out our photos for theirs in the artwork, but because herein we want to discuss the Science of Wet Ass Pussy. We start off with the definition of WAP and breakdown the discussed part of the female genitalia relevant to it. We learn that the key component to WAP is vaginal discharge as a lubricant. Dr. Ruth Arumala, black woman ob/gyn, gives us information about the contents of vaginal discharge and ways of supplementing it if one desires. Dr. Jasmine Abrams, an international behavioral research scientist, educates us on the research related to women's health as it relates to vaginal lubrication. We then end out the episode being educated by Portia Brown, a black woman sex coach and sex educator, who schools us on practical ways of loving and optimizing our body's vaginal lubrication. This is a research and education-based episode between women who also relate personally to the topic.
    Mentioned in the episode
    E15 Of The Research Her. No Basic Vaginas. How to Avoid Bacterial Vaginosis w/ Dr. Ruthie Arumala
    The Vaginal Microenvironment: The Physiologic Role of Lactobacilli
    Dynamics of the Vaginal Ecosystem—Hormonal Influences
    Books
    Come as you are by Emily Nagoski, Ph.D.
    Pussy Prayers Black Girl Bliss
    Connect with Them:
    Dr. Ruth Arumala
    Instagram: @i.am.dr.arumala
     
    Dr. Jasmine Abrams
    Instagram: @DrJasmineAbrams
    Twitter: @DrJasmineAbrams
    Website: DrJasmineAbrams.com/
     
    Portia Brown
    Instagram: @FroeticSexology
    Twitter: @FroeticSexology
    Youtube: Froetic Sexology
    Website: FroeticSexology.com
     
     
    Connect with me:
    Website: TheResearchHer.com
    Instagram: @TheResearchHer
    Twitter: @TheResearchHer
    Facebook: @TheResearchHer
     
    Ways to subscribe to The Research Her podcast
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    Have feedback?
    Download the FREE "The Research Her" APP on iOS and Android (to directly send feedback)
    Email HitUsUp@TheResearchHer.com

    • 55 min
    Exercise-Induced Orgasm and Sexual Pleasure Among Women

    Exercise-Induced Orgasm and Sexual Pleasure Among Women

    In this solo episode, I dive into the research of Debby Herbenick and Dennis Fortenberry in their article Exercise-induced orgasm and pleasure among women. The study had the goals of understanding of exercise-induced orgasm and exercise-induced sexual pleasure. This studied surveyed over 500 women and found out how many experienced orgasms and/or sexual pleasure while working out.
     
    This topic is shared to
    help reduce how taboo discussions about orgasms are.  encourage more of us to exercise to improve the quality and quantity of our life. Explore the amazing research field surrounding the femme orgasm.  
    Let's normalize sexuality talk.
     
    Show Citations:
     
    Exercise-induced orgasm and pleasure among women by
    Debby Herbenick & J. Dennis Fortenberry
     
    *Note* I am not an expert in this field. All literature interpretations are from my perspective and do not always reflect the intention of the authors.
     
    Connect with me:
    Website: TheResearchHer.com
    Instagram: @TheResearchHer
    Twitter: @TheResearchHer
    Facebook: @TheResearchHer
     
    Ways to subscribe to The Research Her podcast
    Google
    Apple
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    Spotify
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    Have feedback?
    Download the FREE "The Research Her" APP on iOS and Android (to directly send feedback)
    Email HitUsUp@TheResearchHer.com

    • 11 min
    Exploring Sexuality, Colorism and Texturism with SEXpert Dr. Donna Oriowo

    Exploring Sexuality, Colorism and Texturism with SEXpert Dr. Donna Oriowo

    Dr. Donna Oriowo wanted to learn more about being a sex therapist after watching Meet the Fockers and that was what led her to find her career path. She is assisting primarily Black women on a journey to understanding their sexuality. Her philosophy is that sexuality is at the core of a lot of mental health challenges.
     
    In this episode, Dr. Donna Oriowo breaks down how colorism and texturism impact our self-image. She explains how white supremacy plays a role in how Black people teach each other. She breaks down how beauty standards help feed our capitalist society. We jump into who is impacted by colorism and texturism also where it stems from.
     
    About Donna Oriowo
     
    Dr. Donna Oriowo is an international speaker, clinically licensed social worker, and a sex & relationship educator and therapist. Born in Washington D.C. and raised on jollof rice and fried chicken with mumbo sauce. Dr. Oriowo graduated from the illustrious Morgan State University with a B.S. in Psychology. She graduated in 2012 with a double master's in Social Work and Education for Human Sexuality from Widener University and continued at that University to get her Ph.D. in Human Sexuality. Dr. Donna is a certified therapist and colorism/texturism sexpert. Dedicated to helping others reclaim their sexuality, identity, and self-love, Dr. Donna emphasizes addressing mental health, intersectionality, culture, and racial justice in both educational and therapeutic settings. With a focus on developing healthy Black female sexuality. She also is the author of the workbook Cocoa Butter & Hair Grease: Exploring Sexuality Through Colorism and Texturism.
     
    Connect with her:
    Website: Annodright.com or thecbhg.com
    Instagram: @annodright
    Her Book: Cocoa Butter Hair Grease
     
    Connect with me:
    Website: TheResearchHer.com
    Instagram: @TheResearchHer
    Twitter: @TheResearchHer
    Facebook: @TheResearchHer
     
    Ways to subscribe to The Research Her podcast
    Google
    Apple
    Stitcher
    Spotify
    RSS feed
     
    Have feedback?
    Download the FREE "The Research Her" APP on iOS and Android (to directly send feedback)
    Email HitUsUp@TheResearchHer.com

    • 50 min
    Changing the Narrative of Black Families through Clinical Research and Programming

    Changing the Narrative of Black Families through Clinical Research and Programming

    Dr. Ijeoma Opara was not always clear about her career path, but she wanted to be sure that she was an expert in whatever field she chose. Her Nigerian parents did not try to push her into any career but instead just told her to be the best at whatever she chooses. After losing her parents due to complications with diabetes, Dr. Opara wanted to address the issues that her community faced so that this does not continue happening which landed her in her current research position.
     
    At a young age, she knew that she needed to take her academic success into her own hands. After getting to her senior year in high school, she realized that she did not have the classes that she needed to get into a four-year university. She instead started at community college and earned her associate degree before continuing on to get her bachelor's degree.
     
    Dr. Opara thought when she was finishing her bachelor's that she wanted to go to law school. She took the LSAT twice and got into law schools but chose to not attend because she did not feel it was her true calling. Though Dr. Opara faced many trials and tribulations, she ended up exactly where she was meant to be. Learn more about her journey by listening to Episode 37 of The Research Her podcast.
     
    About Dr. Ijeoma Opara
     
    Dr. Opara received her Ph.D. in Family Science and Human Development at Montclair State University, her Master of Social Work from New York University, Master of Public Health in Epidemiology at New York Medical College, and a Bachelor of Arts from New Jersey City University.  
     
    Currently, Dr. Opara is a professor at Stony Brook University School of Social Welfare and Visiting Faculty at Yale University School of Public Health. Dr. Opara also directs a consulting agency that offers training to youth, community-based organizations, companies, and schools on various topics related to substance use prevention, sexual health, and more.
     
    Connect with her:
    Website: ijeomaopara.com
    Instagram: @dr.ijeoma.opara
    Twitter: @IjeomaOo
    LinkedIn: Ijeoma Opara, PhD, LMSW, MPH
     
    Connect with me:
    Website: TheResearchHer.com
    Instagram: @TheResearchHer
    Twitter: @TheResearchHer
    Facebook: @TheResearchHer
     
    Ways to subscribe to The Research Her podcast
    Google
    Apple
    Stitcher
    Spotify
    RSS feed
     
    Have feedback?
    Download the FREE "The Research Her" APP on iOS and Android (to directly send feedback)
    Email HitUsUp@TheResearchHer.com

    • 43 min
    This is what depression looks like. My STEMnoire Story

    This is what depression looks like. My STEMnoire Story

    The #STEMNOIREstory that I’m telling today is my post PhD hardships. This is what depression looks like. It isn’t all tears and bad hair days. For me its makeup, fake smile, and trying to prove myself to others. Ever notice you’ve never seen any graduation pictures? I told myself I didn’t deserve to celebrate that accomplishment over and over again. So here a piece of my STEMNoire Story. Unfiltered and uncut.
     
    As a chemist, I have been trained in understanding the science of reactions. You put in reactants and you get products. So, it was not shocking that after 4 years of putting energy into getting a PhD that I finally did. I didn’t know I was a superhero until mid-March when I first started sharing my dissertation story to other black women in STEM who had completed theirs as long as 2 decades ago. In sharing, I was embraced and felt normal. That is why communities like @stemnoire are essential because they empower us and give us the fundamental human need for belonging.
     
    While working on my dissertation was at my lowest. I cried every day for over 7 months. I cried every day on the days that led up to me writing my thesis, every day while writing my thesis, every day after completing my thesis. Every day while preparing for my defense, the day that I defend, every day after defending. I cried every day leading up to graduation, the day of graduation, and the days after graduation. My strength had run out. I made some of the worst, made most degrading decisions during this time. I didn’t want to be here anymore. I had decided after all this there was nothing was left. Again, I’m a chemist. I am trained to be a logical thinker and yet I’m sitting here ready for it all to be over before it even started. Until February 17th, 2020, when the small voice that was left in my head of my highest self said THIS SHIT DON’T MAKE NO FUCKING SENSE. Who had I become?
     
    I was 3 months post defense and I was still treating myself like I didn’t deserve anything. I immediately got on Google and figured out where I needed to go to get help *expeditiously* and I did. Over time, I was diagnosed with major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and PTSD from graduate school. I would wake up in a panic every night because I couldn’t process being done. I didn’t know how to handle stress because clinically I was sick and refused to take action because it made me too uncomfortable. I’m a black woman. It’s not okay to not be okay.
     
    Looking back now, I’m just happy that I wasn’t afraid to make that call. The one that saved my life. I know there are people out there suffering, fighting for something with all the while still feeling incapable of obtaining it. You are beyond capable and you deserve. Listen, if you don’t feel you deserve, find you people who can feed into you until you do. Trust me you are not the only one that has felt this.
     
    In passing, I told a black woman who had graduated with her PhD in a STEM field over a decade ago “Yeah, I had a complete meltdown after defending. I lost my sense of self and the desire to live” and she literally made us pause and we just stared at each other for a few seconds. She then asked to hug me. At this point I’m thinking “Damn Elissia, you did it again with the oversharing thing” but what happened next literally changed my perspective. It was at that moment that my resentment and pain turned to pride and appreciation. She told me she had a complete emotional breakdown after completing too and she had the same feelings. Her only regret? Never stopping and healing that pain before jumping into the next stage in her career.
     
    Now, this is the first time that I’m sharing my story with another person who had completed a PhD in science so I’m thinking we must be the exception. I’ll say this. After four months of

    • 13 min
    Combining Pole Fitness and Psychology for Liberation w/ The Polecologist, Dr. Kristen Nichole

    Combining Pole Fitness and Psychology for Liberation w/ The Polecologist, Dr. Kristen Nichole

    In the episode, we are blessed with the presence of Dr. Kristen Nichole. She is a performance artist, scholar, educator, trainer, coach, entrepreneur, mother, and wife. Kristen is a south Florida native and graduate of The University of Central Florida (B.S. in Psychology) and The University of Miami (M.S.Ed in Community and Social Change). Kristen also has a Ph.D. in Applied Social and Community Psychology from North Carolina State University.
     
    Kristen needed an escape and she found that in the pole community. Pole fitness and dance offered a space for Kristen to reconnect with her full self again. Additionally, her doctoral training in community psychology allowed her to see that pole is a tool for coping with adversity and creating self. 
    Kristen integrates her expertise in psychology with her training as an ACE and XPERT certified pole fitness instructor to guide her clients and students along a journey of self-exploration and liberation through pole fitness and dance. Kristen has coined her work Polecology®.
     
    Dr. Kristen and I had such an amazing conversation starting with her high school memories of being on the biotech track in high school thinking she would go the physical science route. After taking AP Psychology, she realized even at that young age that her calling was in working with people. She went away, not too far not too close to home, and during most of her time in undergrad, she did not see herself pursuing higher education. It was during this time that she first took a pole dancing class when her roommate offered to take her with a Groupon… She ready… She did not find love in pole at the moment. She had hopes of going to the Peace Corps but was denied due to a peanut allergy. It was then that she decided to pursue a master's degree. She had a black woman academic that brought to her attention the option of pursuing a PhD and that is when she went for it. 
     
    During her first year, she experienced a lot of emotional distress and truly wanted to drop out. It was through her husband's support that she found solace and endurance. She had started doing pole dancing for fitness purposes, but she experienced whorephobia and felt uncomfortable with the idea of people thinking she was sexy in the exercise. She got pregnant and after giving birth she suffered from post-partum conditions. She had the great resource of having an advisor who had recently had a child. She suffered from post-partum depression. She also had a condition called diastasis recti that caused the two sides of her abdomen to split away from each other. After months of physical therapy, she was able to get back to pole dancing but in a different manner. This time she was liberated. She had discovered the beauty in this artform and coined the term Polecology. She now teaches her student in the School of Polecology how to use the pole to make meaning.
     
    Connect with her:
    Website: ThePolecologist.com
    Instagram: @ThePolecologist
     
    Connect with me:
    Website: TheResearchHer.com
    Instagram: @TheResearchHer
    Twitter: @TheResearchHer
    Facebook: @TheResearchHer
     
    Ways to subscribe to The Research Her podcast
    Google
    Apple
    Stitcher
    Spotify
    RSS feed
     
    Have feedback?
    Download the FREE "The Research Her" APP on iOS and Android (to directly send feedback)
    Email HitUsUp@TheResearchHer.com

    • 53 min

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