87 episodes

Quality journalism in these very dangerous times

theAnalysis.news Paul Jay

    • Politics

Quality journalism in these very dangerous times

    Is Trump the Tip of a More Coherent Fascist Spear?

    Is Trump the Tip of a More Coherent Fascist Spear?

    Is the level of political discourse a reflection of the rise of fascism in the United States? Will Biden set the stage for a more dangerous far-right demagogue? Adolph Reed and Leo Panitch say organizing a renewed labor movement is crucial for defeating the rise of fascism. On theAnalysis.news podca







    Is the level of political discourse a reflection of the rise of fascism in the United States? Will Biden set the stage for a more dangerous far-right demagogue? Adolph Reed and Leo Panitch say organizing a renewed labor movement is crucial for defeating the rise of fascism. On theAnalysis.news podcast with Paul Jay















    Transcript coming soon

    • 53 min
    A Desperate Trump Will Do Desperate Things – Larry Wilkerson

    A Desperate Trump Will Do Desperate Things – Larry Wilkerson

    Larry Wilkerson and Paul Jay discuss a possible rout of the GOP, and what a desperate Trump might do before the transfer of power. If Biden wins, massive pressure is needed to make him reduce deep income inequality, or a new authoritarian threat will emerge by 2024. Transcript Paul Jay Hi, I'm Paul







    Larry Wilkerson and Paul Jay discuss a possible rout of the GOP, and what a desperate Trump might do before the transfer of power. If Biden wins, massive pressure is needed to make him reduce deep income inequality, or a new authoritarian threat will emerge by 2024.







    Transcript







    Paul Jay







    Hi, I'm Paul Jay and welcome to theAnalysis.news podcast. Please don't forget there's a donate button at the top of the webpage.







    The prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, which has never taken a partisan political position before in its 208-year publication history, urged readers Thursday to vote Trump out of office for his COVID-19 response, saying his administration has, quote, taken a crisis and turned it into a tragedy. Trump told Fox News that now, quote, the gloves are off. So too, any pretense of sanity. A desperate Trump is likely to do desperate things.







    Now joining us to talk about what we might expect is Lawrence Wilkerson. He's a retired United States Army colonel and former chief of staff to the United States Secretary of State Colin Powell. Larry is a distinguished adjunct professor of government and public policy at the College of William and Mary. He's a member of the National Task Force for Election Crises. Thanks very much for joining us, Larry.







    Lawrence Wilkerson







     Good to be with you, Paul.







    Paul Jay







    So, since we talked last, there's been a presidential debate. There's been a vice presidential debate. President Trump has had COVID. President Trump has been visited with a miracle cure and seems to be more loony than ever. What do you make of the status of things?







    Lawrence Wilkerson







    Just as you said, it is an insane moment, and I'm thinking it can get even more so, between now and November the 3rd and then after November the 3rd unless we have and this is what I'm hoping for as a member of these different political groups looking at the elections, a popular and Electoral College blowout. And I hope it's for Biden. That way I think we have less of a chance for some of this contention, maybe even blood in the streets that we're talking about and that we've simulated and seen in the simulations.







    Paul Jay







    So, what has changed about the simulations, if anything, as a result of the COVID situation? He seems to be recovering, although it's pretty hard to tell whether this cocktail of drugs is just sort of floated him up and there's still a big bang to come. Or maybe it actually was effective. Who knows? I mean, this disease is so hard to predict.







    Lawrence Wilkerson







    More than that. I think the personal situation with the president and now possibly even the vice president and certainly a lot of people around the president, the White House, I was told yesterday, is like a tomb. The West Wing in particular. People were very frightened. People are really scared to even go to work. And that includes the Secret Service, which is not the way it usually is with the Secret Service.







    But I think the bigger implication in the way you asked your question for the elections is what our advisor, Dr. Michael Osterholm, has told us is probably coming. And that is a situation in October and November, possibly December that's much worse than the summer.

    • 35 min
    How Deep Will the Depression Get? – Rana Foroohar and Mark Blyth

    How Deep Will the Depression Get? – Rana Foroohar and Mark Blyth

    Rana Foroohar, Financial Times columnist and author (Don't Be Evil: How Big Tech Betrayed Its Founding Principles), and Mark Blyth, political economist and author (Angrynomics), join Paul Jay for a wide-ranging conversation about the deepening depression, inequality, and China. On theAnalysis.news p







    Rana Foroohar, Financial Times columnist and author (Don't Be Evil: How Big Tech Betrayed Its Founding Principles), and Mark Blyth, political economist and author (Angrynomics), join Paul Jay for a wide-ranging conversation about the deepening depression, inequality, and China. On theAnalysis.news podcast.







    Transcript







    Paul Jay







    Hi, I'm Paul Jay, and welcome to theAnalysis.news podcast. Don't forget; we need you to click the donate button if you haven't already because, without your support, we can't do this.







    So, after the shit show debate and the ongoing warnings of a second or even third wave of the pandemic, I'm left with some questions.







    First of all, does the shit show debate reflect an even more profound problem with the U. S. economy and political structures? Two, the financial and tech elites, how are they responding to the campaign, the debate? Have they bailed on the maniac or just doubling down on the Senate? How deep and how long will the recession, depression go? It looks like there could be more lockdowns. Four, if there is another full lockdown, which many scientists are saying will be necessary to contain the second, third wave. What, if any, are the limits of how much money the Fed can pump into the economy? What are the economic limits? What are the political limits? Six, how serious is the split over the new Fed money? Does Wall Street want a big new stimulus package? Are there really serious concerns about the U.S. dollar? And finally, seven, if we have time to get to it, is Wall Street getting the danger of the climate crisis? Will they do anything about it? Will they accept the government intervening in a serious way with regulations and massive investments in green infrastructure, including phasing out fossil fuel, not just relying on carbon capture, which is mostly what the Biden plan is about.







    Now, joining me to break this down, our two guests that are not only brilliant analysts of all this, but they also have unique access to the minds of the lords of Wall Street.







    First of all, Rana Foroohar who is a business columnist and an associate editor at the Financial Times. She's also CNN's global economic analyst. And her books include 'Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance in the Fall of American Business' and 'Don't Be Evil:  How Big Tech Betrayed Its Founding Principles,' and returning Mark Blyth is a political economist at Brown University. He researches the causes of stability and change in the economy. And as he told me, why people continue to believe stupid economic ideas despite buckets of evidence to the contrary.







    So, first of all, Rana, let me ask you. So, first of all, your reaction to the debate and the bigger question, what does this tell us about the disarray in American politics, and why is there? Is there something going on in the U.S. economy and basic political structures that kind of give rise to this craziness?







    Rana Faroohar







    Well, thank you, Paul, for having me, and first, let me tune my earpiece so I can hear the Lords of Finance speaking to me. I was stunned by the debate. I mean, on one level, at the most surface level, the debate was just kind of this toxic mud-slinging wrestling match. You've likened it to Trump's debating style in general to pro wrestling. I think that's true. But I guess I would take a step back and say, all right, how did we get to a place where,

    • 53 min
    Daniel Ellsberg on the Assange Extradition and Growing Fascism

    Daniel Ellsberg on the Assange Extradition and Growing Fascism

    [A full video interview] The leaker of the Pentagon Papers says that if Assange is extradited to the U.S., no journalist in the world is safe from being kidnapped to the United States to face life imprisonment for reporting on information like Chelsea Manning released. Daniel Ellsberg joins Paul Jay







    [A full video interview] The leaker of the Pentagon Papers says that if Assange is extradited to the U.S., no journalist in the world is safe from being kidnapped to the United States to face life imprisonment for reporting on information like Chelsea Manning released. Daniel Ellsberg joins Paul Jay on theanalysis.news podcast.







    Transcription







    Paul Jay







    Hi, I'm Paul Jay. Welcome to theAnalysis.news podcast. Don't forget there's a donate button at the top of the Web page, and if you haven't donated, perhaps now would be a good time.







    Early Friday morning, President Donald Trump tweeted that he was infected with COVID-19. Of course, this has become almost the only story covered by major American news media, and understandably so is it may change the outcome of the November elections and perhaps even who is president in the coming weeks. And, of course, there's a crazy irony to it all.







    Some say poetic justice, but prior to Trump's news, the U.S. media almost completely ignored a story that is not only newsworthy in its own right but is of crucial importance to the American media itself.







    And that is the extradition hearing for Julian Assange. If Assange is found guilty of the charges the U.S. government has laid against him. It means that whistleblowing and the publishing of whistleblowers revelations is dead. In fact, much of investigative journalism would be dead. A British judge said on Thursday, October 1st, she would give her decision on January 4th on whether Assange should be extradited to the United States to face charges, including espionage. The U.S. authorities accuse Australian-born Assange of conspiring to hack government computers and the violating espionage law in connection with the release of confidential cables by WikiLeaks in 2010 and 2011.







    The week of hearings has heard evidence that exposes the charges against Assange as trumped-up and even ridiculous.







    The most important whistleblower in American history, Daniel Ellsberg, submitted an eight-page written statement to the court in London opposing the extradition. And Daniel now joins us from Berkeley, California, to discuss the Assange case and what he considers growing fascism in the United States. Thanks for joining us, Daniel.







    Daniel Ellsberg Thank you. Glad to be here.







    Paul Jay







    So you've been quoted as saying that there hasn't been such a significant attack on the freedom of the press since your case in 1971. Why do you think it holds such important?







    Daniel Ellsberg







    I wasn't the first whistleblower in America or the first leaker of classified information? Of course, that goes on almost every day, every hour. Some part of the government putting out classified information that serves some agency or serves the president's policy that's authorized disclosure in effect of classified information. But there have been major leaks, of course, before me and after me. I was the first American to be prosecuted for giving information on unauthorized classified information to the American public. And I was prosecuted under the Espionage Act, which had never been intended or shaped for such a prosecution.







    It was intended for spies. And people give information secretly to a foreign government to advantage them, especially in wartime.

    • 49 min
    The Significance of the “Shit Show” Debate – Panitch, Day, Horne & Jay

    The Significance of the “Shit Show” Debate – Panitch, Day, Horne & Jay

    Prof. Leo Panitch, Jacobin writer Meagan Day, and Historian Gerald Horne join Paul Jay to analyze the Presidential debate and the underlying reasons why the U.S. political system is in disarray. They discuss how the people's movement will respond to a possible Trump coup if he loses the election. Tr







    Prof. Leo Panitch, Jacobin writer Meagan Day, and Historian Gerald Horne join Paul Jay to analyze the Presidential debate and the underlying reasons why the U.S. political system is in disarray. They discuss how the people's movement will respond to a possible Trump coup if he loses the election.







    Transcript







    Paul JayHi, I'm Paul Jay. Welcome to theAnalysis.news podcast.







    Michael BufferLet's get ready to rumbleeeeee!







    Paul JayThat was how ring announcer Michael Buffer would start WWF wrestling matches. He should have beenon hand to start things off for Chris Wallace at the presidential debate. Donald Trump actually playedhimself as a character in WWF, fighting Vince McMahon, the owner of the massive pro-wrestlingempire. McMahon's wife now sits in Trump's cabinet after the couple donated millions of dollars toTrump's campaign.In 1954, writing about professional wrestling in Paris, philosopher Roland Barthes wrote that prowrestling is light without shadow, emotion without reserve, and the master of that storytelling wasVince McMahon. He understood that millions of people want to scream in anger, cheer bad guys, andthe more flawed the character, the more people cheered. He understood the era of the good guy wasover, and invented characters that were the embodiment of every value people had been taught not tohold. It was a wonderful release for people to express hatred without reserve.Trump, in front of 85,000 people, got to beat up McMahon and shave his hair off, because that's what itwas, a winner gets to shave the other guy's hair off. He stood at the center of the ring, soaking in thewild cheers of the adoring crowd, and that's where he learned his politics.His unmitigated rage was on full display in the presidential debate on Tuesday night.He really thought he could win the debate with the kind of trash talk that works in front of a wrestlingcrowd. And perhaps it would have worked if he was just up against Biden. But at crucial moments, intothe ring would run Chris Wallace, the Fox News journalist, who would take Trump on in a way Bidennever could. Wallace blunted Trump's attack, and even asked a couple of real questions that Trumpcouldn't handle, especially when asked to denounce white supremacy. Only the manic megalomania ofTrump could make the poverty of policy of Joe Biden look good.And what does this "shit show," to quote a CNN pundit who actually said that on-air, say about the stateof the American state? Why is the political system in such disarray? And what about the real issues thatwere supposed to be debated and were mostly ignored? Now, joining us to try to make sense out of allof this is Meagan Day. She's a staff writer at Jacobin and co-author of the book "Bigger Than Bernie:How we Go from the Sanders Campaign to Democratic Socialism."Gerald Horne holds the John Jay and Rebecca Moore chair of history and African-American Studies atthe University of Houston, and is the author of many books, including "The Counter-Revolution of 1776,"and Leo Panitch is the emeritus distinguished research professor of political science at York University inToronto, and co-author of "The Socialist Register." Thanks so much for joining me, all of you.







    Leo PanitchGlad to be here Paul.







    Gerald HorneThank you.







    Meagan DayHi. Thanks for having us.







    Paul JaySo, Gerald, kick us off. What was your overall impression of what you heard and saw?







    Gerald HorneWell,

    • 1 hr 12 min
    The Global Police State

    The Global Police State

    Greg Wilpert talks to sociology Professor William I. Robinson about his just-released book, The Global Police State, in which he outlines the confluence of interests between transnational capital, 21st-century fascism, and the general policing of society. Greg WilpertWelcome to theAnalysis.news podc







    Greg Wilpert talks to sociology Professor William I. Robinson about his just-released book, The Global Police State, in which he outlines the confluence of interests between transnational capital, 21st-century fascism, and the general policing of society.











    Greg WilpertWelcome to theAnalysis.news podcast. I'm your guest host, Greg Wilpert. I'm recording this podcastepisode a few days after a new wave of Black Lives Matter protests following a decision not to chargethe police officers who killed Breonna Taylor. Of course, as usual, there was plenty of repression againstthe protests which took place across the United States. What the protests and the police repressionhighlight is the extent to which inequality, and resistance to inequality and injustice, and the repressionagainst the resistance fit together.One sociologist who has argued that this is part of a worldwide trend is William I. Robinson. As ithappens, he just released a book on this topic called "The Global Police State," published this month byPluto Press. Will Robinson joins me today to discuss his book. He's a professor of sociology at theUniversity of California, Santa Barbara, and is the author of numerous books on the topic ofglobalization. Thanks for joining me today, Bill.







    William RobinsonPleasure to be with you.







    Greg WilpertSo your book actually covers a lot of ground, including your larger theory of globalization and globalcapitalism. But let's start with the issue at hand, the global police state. Why has it become a globalphenomenon at this point, and how does it express itself?







    William RobinsonYes, well, the starting point for any discussion of the global police state has to be the crisis of globalcapitalism. Of course, I finished this book in October of 2019 so I could not see the pandemic coming,but the system was already in an acute crisis, and I'm going to suggest really the most acute crisis of its500 years, that is world capitalism well before the pandemic. And the only thing the pandemic did is toaggravate this crisis and aggravate everything, pushing us towards an intensification of global policestate.And certainly, the crisis that we're in is multidimensional. There is the ecological dimension, whichmakes it an existential crisis. And then there's the social dimension of the crisis in the sense that billionsof people around the world cannot survive. But that only becomes a crisis, the social dimension, untiland unless these billions of people rise up, and that's taking place now. But I think we need to focus ontwo other dimensions of the crisis. One is what we call the structural dimension, and that is that theglobal economy has been increasingly stagnant.And in the face of that stagnation, the building up of a global police state is a way of continuing to throwfirewood on the dying embers and stagnant embers of a global economy, and I'll get into this in a littlemore detail in a little while. But this structural dimension of the crisis is driving global police state, and







    then global capitalism is facing a deep political crisis of legitimacy and of hegemony. And global policestate is a response to this multidimensional crisis of global capitalism.I would say that we're in a moment of inflection, an extremely dangerous moment. We are slipping intothe threat of fascism. But also, this moment opens up tremendous opportunities for emancipatoryprojects. The capitalist states have been unable to cope with the crisis and with the pandemic,

    • 54 min

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