1,306 episodes

Host Rachel Feltman, alongside leading science and tech journalists, dives into the rich world of scientific discovery in this bite-size science variety show.

Science Quickly Scientific American

    • Science

Host Rachel Feltman, alongside leading science and tech journalists, dives into the rich world of scientific discovery in this bite-size science variety show.

    Cleaning Up Paris’s Poop River for the Olympics

    Cleaning Up Paris’s Poop River for the Olympics

    The Seine is set to feature prominently in the Paris 2024 Olympics’ Opening Ceremony—and in its marathon swimming events. But this urban waterway has been challenging to clean and keep clean after a particularly wet summer and high bacterial counts.

    What can the Parisian organizers learn from the revitalization of a U.S. river that was so polluted that it inspired the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency? Scientific American associate news editor Allison Parshall takes us to the banks of the reformed Cuyahoga River in Ohio. 

    Plus, she gives us a look at the growing urban river swimming movement in Europe.

    Recommended Reading
    Training with 'Digital Twins' Could Boost Olympic Swimmer Speeds 

    Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman with guest and Scientific American associate news editor Allison Parshall. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith.

    E-mail us at sciencequickly@sciam.com if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover!

    Discover something new every day: subscribe to Scientific American and sign up for Today in Science, our daily newsletter. 

    The Seine is set to feature prominently in the Paris 2024 Olympics’ Opening Ceremony—and in its marathon swimming events. But this urban waterway has been challenging to clean and keep clean after a particularly wet summer and high bacterial counts.

    What can the Parisian organizers learn from the revitalization of a U.S. river that was so polluted that it inspired the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency? Scientific American associate news editor Allison Parshall takes us to the banks of the reformed Cuyahoga River in Ohio. 

    Plus, she gives us a look at the growing urban river swimming movement in Europe.

    Recommended Reading
    Training with 'Digital Twins' Could Boost Olympic Swimmer Speeds https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/training-with-digital-twins-could-boost-olympic-swimmer-speeds/ 

    E-mail us at sciencequickly@sciam.com if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover!

    Discover something new every day: subscribe to Scientific American: https://www.scientificamerican.com/getsciam/
    And sign up for Today in Science, our daily newsletter: https://www.scientificamerican.com/account/email-preferences/

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    • 24 min
    Name a Quasi-Moon with Radiolab Host Latif Nasser

    Name a Quasi-Moon with Radiolab Host Latif Nasser

    Science journalist and Radiolab host Latif Nasser found himself at the center of a space mystery. A space poster in his child’s room showed Zoozve, a moon circling Venus. Only Nasser had never heard of Zoozve—and neither had anyone else. Nasser brings us the story of Zoozve the quasi-moon and brings listeners the opportunity to name a quasi-moon of their own.

    Recommended listening
    Zoozve 
    Name a Quasi-Moon with Radiolab
    Quasi-Moon Contest 

    E-mail us at sciencequickly@sciam.com if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover!
    Discover something new every day: subscribe to Scientific American and sign up for Today in Science, our daily newsletter. 
    Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman with special guest Latif Nasser, Radiolab host. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith.
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    • 13 min
    The Kavli Prize Presents: Building Materials From The Bottom Up [Sponsored]

    The Kavli Prize Presents: Building Materials From The Bottom Up [Sponsored]

    Chad Mirkin, recipient of the 2024 Kavli Prize in Nanoscience, has spent his career exploring the possibilities of creating and inventing materials at the nanoscale.
    This podcast was produced for The Kavli Prize by Scientific American Custom Media, a division separate from the magazine’s board of editors.
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    • 9 min
    Astronauts Can Drink More Recycled Pee Than Ever, and You Can Still Catch the Plague

    Astronauts Can Drink More Recycled Pee Than Ever, and You Can Still Catch the Plague

    We commemorate the 55th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, dive into NASA’s groundbreaking Mars habitat simulation and discuss the innovative ​​“stillsuits” designed to recycle astronaut pee and how they could enhance spacewalks. Plus, we discuss the record-breaking Hurricane Beryl and its implications for climate change policies, and a surprising case of the plague in Colorado. 
    Recommended reading:
    – One Small Step Back in Time: Relive the Wonder of Apollo 11
    – Why Hurricane Beryl Underwent Unprecedented Rapid Intensification
    Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith.
    E-mail us at sciencequickly@sciam.com if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover!
    Discover something new every day: subscribe to Scientific American and sign up for Today in Science, our daily newsletter.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 9 min
    On Thin Ice: Contemplating Our Climate Future in Antarctica (Part 4)

    On Thin Ice: Contemplating Our Climate Future in Antarctica (Part 4)

    We’re at the end of the Nathaniel B. Palmer’s Antarctic expedition. The researchers onboard are returning sea ice and thousands of gallons of seawater. These samples will allow them to examine biogeochemical processes, some of which are linked to climate change. As the research vessel makes its way back to port, the scientists reflect on the future of our planet and the question of whether the ice in Antarctica will always be around for sampling.
    Listen to the first three episodes of this series: 
    – Glacial Melting Could Change the Chemistry of Antarctic Seawater 
    – Penguins and Ice Samples Make This Research Vessel Paradice
    – Life for Researchers on This Icebreaker Is Cold and Fulfilling
    E-mail us at sciencequickly@sciam.com if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover!
    Discover something new every day: subscribe to Scientific American and sign up for Today in Science, our daily newsletter.
    Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by journalist Sofia Moutinho. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith.
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    • 17 min
    Saving the Last Truly Wild Horse

    Saving the Last Truly Wild Horse

    Przewalski’s horses are truly wild horses, even the ones held in captivity. They traditionally roamed the Central Asian steppes, so you can imagine everyone’s surprise when two separate accounts on TikTok claimed to have found a Przewalski’s horse here in the U.S. But as guest and Scientific American associate news editor Allison Parshall will tell you, the real story is the remarkable conservation efforts that led to a resurgence for this horse, which was once considered extinct in the wild.
    The Last Wild Horses Are Finally Returning to Their Natural Habitat 
    How a Cloned Ferret Inspired a DNA Bank for Endangered Species 
    Science Quickly is produced by Rachel Feltman, Fonda Mwangi, Kelso Harper, Madison Goldberg and Jeff DelViscio. This episode was hosted by Rachel Feltman with guest and associate news editor Allison Parshall. Our show is edited by Elah Feder, Alexa Lim, Madison Goldberg and Anaissa Ruiz Tejada, with fact-checking by Shayna Posses and Aaron Shattuck. The theme music was composed by Dominic Smith.
    E-mail us at sciencequickly@sciam.com if you have any questions, comments or ideas for stories we should cover!
    Discover something new every day: subscribe to Scientific American and sign up for Today in Science, our daily newsletter. 
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 15 min

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