300 episódios

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

Philosophy Talk Starters Philosophy Talk Starters

    • Educação

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

    452: How to Humbly Disagree

    452: How to Humbly Disagree

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/how-humbly-disagree.

    People like to argue, especially Philosophy Talk listeners! But no matter how hard we try to resolve disputes through rational discourse, sometimes we may still disagree about important issues. One response to this predicament is simply to agree to disagree. But should the mere fact of disagreement lower our confidence in our views? Should we change how we judge our own beliefs when we realize that other people disagree? Or do we only have reason to doubt our beliefs when we learn that experts disagree with us? The Philosophy humbly welcome Nathan Ballantyne from Fordham University, author of "Knowing Our Limits" (forthcoming).

    • 50 min
    378: Heidegger

    378: Heidegger

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/heidegger.

    Best known for his work "Being and Time," Martin Heidegger has been hailed by many as the greatest philosopher of the twentieth century. He has also been criticized for being both nearly unreadable and a Nazi. Yet there is no disputing his seminal place in the history of Western thought. So what did Heidegger mean when he wrote about world, being, and time? What significance does he still hold as a thinker today, especially as a philosopher of modern technology? Should we even read the works of a Nazi? John and Ken are present and ready with Thomas Sheehan from Stanford University, author of "Making Sense of Heidegger: A Paradigm Shift."

    • 10 min
    509: Citizenship and Justice

    509: Citizenship and Justice

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/citizenship-and-justice.

    Securing citizenship to a developed country could guarantee people enormous privileges and opportunities. Some condemn those who try illegally to reap the benefits that come with such citizenship. But are our ways of determining who gets to enter borders arbitrary and unfair? Should we grant border access to people born in a nation’s territories, or also on people whose parents were citizens? Or should we favor the highly skilled who can contribute the most to the nation? What is the most just way to determine citizenship? Josh and Ray cross the border with Arash Abizadeh from McGill University, author of "Hobbes and the Two Faces of Ethics."

    • 10 min
    453: Adorno and the Culture Industry

    453: Adorno and the Culture Industry

    More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/culture-industry.

    What's your favorite movie? Did you watch that season finale last night? No spoilers! Popular cultures pervades modern life. But what if pop culture was actually more pernicious than we ordinarily think? Could it be systematically deceiving us—eroding our ability to think for ourselves and fight for change? That's what the 20th century German philosopher Theodor Adorno thought. The Philosophers get cultured on Adorno's life and thought with Adrian Daub from Stanford University, co-author of "The James Bond Songs: Pop Anthems of Late Capitalism."

    • 11 min
    508: The Merits of Meritocracy

    508: The Merits of Meritocracy

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/merits-meritocracy.

    For centuries, the promise of the “American Dream” has been that as long as someone buckles down and works hard, she can achieve her goals. In other words, we’ve perpetuated the meritocratic notion that the more effort one puts in and the more ability one possesses, the more success one can attain. But is this really the case? Given the historical and societal disadvantages that certain groups of people face, it may appear that a strict meritocracy could not—and should not—exist. So, is a true meritocracy ever attainable? And if it really did exist and were in place, would it be fair? Josh and Ray level the playing field with Jo Littler from the City University of London, author of "Against Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility."

    • 10 min
    500: (There's Still) Time for Summer Reading

    500: (There's Still) Time for Summer Reading

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/time-summer-reading.

    When John and Ken began shopping around their idea for a philosophy-on-the-radio show nearly 20 years ago, many believed it would never work, let alone stay on the air. Nearly two decades later, the program that questions everything (except your intelligence) has hit 500 episodes -- just in time for current co-hosts Josh and Ray to spend our annual summer reading special thinking about time and books about time.

    • Physicist Carlo Rovelli, author of "The Order of Time"
    • Political scientist Elizabeth Cohen, author of "The Political Value of Time"
    • Poet and essayist Jane Hirshfield, author of "Ledger"

    Plus philosopher Jorah Dannenberg on Ted Chiang's "Story of Your Life."

    • 16 min

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