34 episodes

Welcome to yesterday. ArchaeoCafé brings you news, interviews and discussions about archaeology and prehistory.

ArchaeoCaf‪é‬ ArchaeoCafé

    • History

Welcome to yesterday. ArchaeoCafé brings you news, interviews and discussions about archaeology and prehistory.

    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 33 - Community based, collaborative, and Indigenous archaeology: An interview with Kaitlyn Malleau, Sarah Hazell, and Naomi Recollet

    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 33 - Community based, collaborative, and Indigenous archaeology: An interview with Kaitlyn Malleau, Sarah Hazell, and Naomi Recollet

    In this episode I talk with Kaitlyn Malleau, Sarah Hazell, and Naomi Recollet about community based, collaborative, and indigenous archaeology.



    Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website.
    http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-33-malleau-hazell-recollet





    About Kaitlyn Malleau



    Kaitlyn is a Ph.D. student at the University of Toronto where her research focuses on technological systems and how they are shared and communicated between different communities. She is also Director of Education at the Ontario Archaeological Society.

    Web:
    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kaitlyn_Malleau/research
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/kaitlyn-malleau-98862a15a/





    About Naomi Recollet



    Naomi is a member of Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory and is the archivist and programming coordinator at the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation in M'Chigeeng First Nation. She has a double graduate degree in Museum Studies and Information Studies from the University of Toronto. Her interests in archaeology are involve repatriations work, increasing training capacity within and for indigenous communities, making sure that there is space for indigenous knowledge, and creating opportunities for artists, elders, knowledge keepers, archaeologist and other academics to interact with and learn from one another.

    Web:
    http://www.wapikoni.ca/movies/unceded
    http://www.wapikoni.ca/movies/return-of-the-warriors-sword
    https://ojibweculture.ca/





    About Sarah Hazell



    Sarah is a member of Nipissing First Nation. She is also an adjunct professor at Laurentian University, a Ph.D. candidate at McGill University, and the Workshop Coordinator for the Ontario Archaeological Society. Her interest focus on finding ways to build archaeological capacity in indigenous communities in order to eventually create a more equitable place at the table regarding research, legislation and industry.

    Web:
    https://www.ontarioarchaeology.org/resources/Documents/ArchNotes%2024(4).pdf
    https://anishinabeknews.ca/2019/11/26/northern-indigenous-communities-participate-in-archaeological-monitor-training/





    Some useful terminology and links



    Ojibwe Cultural Foundation
    The Ojibwe Cultural Foundation was created to preserve and revitalize the language, culture, arts, spirituality, and traditions of the Anishinaabe People of the Mnidoo Mnising (Manitoulin Island) and surrounding areas.
    https://ojibweculture.ca/


    The revitalization of Anishinaabek ceramics through archaeology, land, and art-making
    a project in partnership between the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation and the Gardiner Museum. 



    Manitoulin Island Summer Historical Institute (MISHI)
    an annual week-long summer institute on Manitoulin Island focused on Anishinaabe studies. Its focus is to bring together students, teachers, knowledge-holders, artists, and Elders to learn about Anishinaabe history and culture. Every summer program has a different theme
    https://robarts.info.yorku.ca/research-clusters/hip/manitoulin-island-summer-historical-institute-mishi/





    For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages.



    Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/

    Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe

    • 42 min
    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 32 - Making scents of archaeology: An interview with Paul Martin (Part 2)

    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 32 - Making scents of archaeology: An interview with Paul Martin (Part 2)

    In this episode I talk more with Paul Martin about the use of dogs on archaeological surveys and his research on testing the potentials and limits of this method.



    Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website.
    http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-32-martin-pt-2





    About Paul Martin



    Paul Martin is an archaeologist, forensic anthropologist, and dog trainer. He is one of the foremost researchers quantitatively investigating the potentials and limitations of using dogs in archaeological research. He runs the archaeological survey company Martin Consulting and is currently doing research at the University of Memphis.

    Web:
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/paul-martin-6a0a9429/
    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Paul_Martin11





    Some useful terminology and links



    Martin Consulting
    An archaeological consulting company that specialises in historical cemetery mapping. Martin Consulting utilizes a multidisciplinary approach - including a combination of geophysics, forensic anthropology, and human remains detection dogs - to conduct archaeological surveys. Previous projects have included locating and mapping small scale historical family cemeteries to large complex surveys to help protect cultural resources and identify potential hazmat hazards.
    https://www.martinarchaeology.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/martinarchaeological/



    Detection dog
    A dog that is trained to use its senses to detect substances and indicate to a handler when these substances are found.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detection_dog



    Human remains detection (HRD) or cadaver dogs
    Dogs that are used to locate the remains of deceased victims
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_and_rescue_dog#Cadaver_dog



    Geophysical survey
    A ground-based physical sensing techniques used for archaeological imaging or mapping.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geophysical_survey_(archaeology)



    Ground-penetrating radar
    A non-intrusive geophysical method of surveying the sub-surface to investigate underground features. The method uses radar pulses to create images of what is beneath the surface.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground-penetrating_radar



    Olfactory system
    the sensory system used for smelling
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olfactory_system



    What the Dog Knows: Scent, Science, and the Amazing Ways Dogs Perceive the World
    book by Cat Warren
    https://catwarren.com/





    For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages.



    Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/

    Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe

    • 1 hr 12 min
    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 31 - Making scents of archaeology: An interview with Paul Martin (Part 1)

    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 31 - Making scents of archaeology: An interview with Paul Martin (Part 1)

    In this episode I talk with Paul Martin about the use of dogs on archaeological surveys and his research on testing the potentials and limits of this method.



    Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website.
    http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-31-martin-pt-1





    About Paul Martin



    Paul Martin is an archaeologist, forensic anthropologist, and dog trainer. He is one of the foremost researchers quantitatively investigating the potentials and limitations of using dogs in archaeological research. He runs the archaeological survey company Martin Consulting and is currently doing research at the University of Memphis.

    Web:
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/paul-martin-6a0a9429/
    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Paul_Martin11





    Some useful terminology and links



    Martin Consulting
    An archaeological consulting company that specialises in historical cemetery mapping. Martin Consulting utilizes a multidisciplinary approach - including a combination of geophysics, forensic anthropology, and human remains detection dogs - to conduct archaeological surveys. Previous projects have included locating and mapping small scale historical family cemeteries to large complex surveys to help protect cultural resources and identify potential hazmat hazards.
    https://www.martinarchaeology.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/martinarchaeological/



    Detection dog
    A dog that is trained to use its senses to detect substances and indicate to a handler when these substances are found.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detection_dog



    Human remains detection (HRD) or cadaver dogs
    Dogs that are used to locate the remains of deceased victims
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_and_rescue_dog#Cadaver_dog



    Geophysical survey
    A ground-based physical sensing techniques used for archaeological imaging or mapping.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geophysical_survey_(archaeology)



    Ground-penetrating radar
    A non-intrusive geophysical method of surveying the sub-surface to investigate underground features. The method uses radar pulses to create images of what is beneath the surface.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground-penetrating_radar



    Olfactory system
    the sensory system used for smelling
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olfactory_system



    What the Dog Knows: Scent, Science, and the Amazing Ways Dogs Perceive the World
    book by Cat Warren
    https://catwarren.com/





    For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages.



    Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/

    Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe

    • 1 hr 2 min
    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 30 - Garden-variety archaeology: An interview with Bonnie Clark

    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 30 - Garden-variety archaeology: An interview with Bonnie Clark

    In this episode we talk with Bonnie Clark about the archaeology of gardens, historical archaeology, and her research at the site of the Amache Japanese internment camp in Colorado, U.S.A.



    Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website.
    http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-30-clark





    About Bonnie Clark



    Dr. Clark is a professor of historical archaeologist at the University of Denver (DU), Department of Anthropology as well as the Curator for Archaeology of the DU Museum of Anthropology. She currently leads the DU Amache Project. Her work on the Amache Project has been highlighted in numerous venues including Archaeology and American Archaeology magazines. In 2011, Dr. Clark’s work was recognized by her peers with the University of Denver’s Teacher/Scholar of the Year award.

    Web:
    https://portfolio.du.edu/bclark
    https://liberalarts.du.edu/about/people/bonnie-j-clark
    https://independent.academia.edu/BonnieJClark
    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Bonnie_Clark3





    Some useful terminology and links



    Japanese American Internment during WWII
    The forced relocation and incarceration in concentration camps in the western interior of the country of about 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry. Sixty-two percent of the internees were United States citizens.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internment_of_Japanese_Americans



    Granada Relocation Project (a.k.a "Camp Amache")
    Located near the town of Granada, Colorado, U.S.A., this relocation center was one of 10 centers constructed in the U.S.A. during World War II for the purpose of interning Japanese Americans and people of Japanese descent. More than 10,000 people passed through Camp Amache and, with over 7,300 internees at its peak. Two-thirds of the internees were citizens of the U.S.A.
    https://www.nps.gov/places/granada-relocation-center.htm



    Amache Preservation Society (APS)
    The APS maintains the physical site of Amache and is instrumental in its preservation. It has renovated and restored key Amache landmarks. https://amache.org/



    DU Amache project
    A community collaboration committed to researching, preserving, and interpreting the physical history of Amache, Colorado’s WWII-era Japanese American internment camp.
    https://portfolio.du.edu/amache
    https://www.facebook.com/DUAmacheResearchProject 





    Selected publications



    Finding Solace in the Soil: An Archaeology of Gardens and Gardeners at Amache
    by Bonnie J. Clark
    Dr. Clark's new book on the archaeology of Amache's gardens.
    https://upcolorado.com/university-press-of-colorado/item/3885-finding-solace-in-the-soil



    Cultivating Community: The Archaeology of Japanese American Confinement at Amache
    by Bonnie Clark
    In: Legacies of Space and Intangible Heritage: Archaeology, Ethnohistory, and the Politics of Cultural Continuity in the Americas (2017)
    https://doi.org/10.5876/9781607325727.c005





    For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages.



    Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/

    Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe

    • 1 hr
    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 29 - Palaeocaninology: An interview with Mietje Germonpré

    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 29 - Palaeocaninology: An interview with Mietje Germonpré

    In this episode I talk with Mietje Germonpré about the origins of domesticated dogs.



    Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website.
    http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-29-germonpre





    About Mietje Germonpré



    Dr. Germonpré is a paleontologist and archaeozoologist, at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, in Brussels, Belgium. Her research includes subjects such as prehistoric canid and the domestication of the wold into the dog, Pleistocene fauna at Paleolithic sites and human-animal relationships, and the seasonality and mobility of the last Neanderthals and first anatomically modern humans in North-Western Europe from a faunal perspective. Her research showed that the wolf was domesticated as a dog more than 30,000 years ago, twice as long as assumed by the current view.

    Web:
    https://naturalsciences-be.academia.edu/MietjeGermonpr%C3%A9
    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mietje_Germonpre
    https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=2xtqux0AAAAJ
    https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8865-0937





    Some useful terminology and links



    Goyet Caves
    a series of connected caves near the village of Mozet in the Namur province of Belgium. During the 1860s, a dog-like cranium was discovered and dated to 31,680 years old.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goyet_Caves



    Předmostí archaeological site
    An important Central European, Late Pleistocene hill site in the north western part of Přerov, Moravia near the city of Přerov in the modern day Czech Republic, dated to between 24,000 and 37,000 years old.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C5%99edmost%C3%AD_u_P%C5%99erova_(archaeological_site)



    Canids
    dog-like carnivorans of the biological family Canidae. All living members of this family are part of the subfamily Caninae, and are called canines. Members of this subfamily include domestic dogs, wolves, foxes, and jackals among others.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canidae



    Origins of the dog
    The origin of the domestic dog includes the dog's genetic divergence from the wolf, its domestication, and its development into dog types and dog breeds.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_the_domestic_dog





    Selected publications



    Origins and genetic legacy of prehistoric dogs
    by Anders Bergström and others
    Science, 2020
    https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aba9572



    Self-domestication or human control? The Upper Palaeolithic domestication of the wolf
    by Mietje Germonpré, and others
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/327766187/



    Palaeolithic dog skulls at the Gravettian Předmostí site, the Czech Republic
    by Mietje Germonpré, Martina Lázničková-Galetová, Mikhail V. Sablin
    Journal of Archaeological Science, 2012
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2011.09.022





    For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages.



    Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/

    Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe

    • 43 min
    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 28 - Racism in archaeology: An interview with Maria Franklin

    ArchaeoCafé - Episode 28 - Racism in archaeology: An interview with Maria Franklin

    In this episode I talk with Maria Franklin about racism and the lack of people of colour in archaeology.



    Episode notes are available on the ArchaeoCafé website.
    http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeocafe-podcast-ep-28-franklin





    About Maria Franklin



    Dr. Franklin is a professor at the Department of Anthropology at the University of Texas. Her research focuses on the archaeology of historical periods in the USA with a particular emphasis on black populations during and after slavery and incorporates oral history and descendant community involvement. Her interests include also public involvement in archaeological research and the politics of archaeology itself. Dr. Franklin has previously sat on the Board of Directors of the Society for Historical Archaeology.

    Web:
    https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/anthropology/faculty/mf65474
    https://utexas.academia.edu/MariaFranklin
    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Maria_Franklin3
    http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4561-6397





    Some useful terminology and links



    Society of Black Archaeologists
    The mission of the Society of Black Archaeologists (SBA) is to promote academic excellence and social responsibility by creating a space for Black archaeologists and other scholars who support SBA’s goals and activities.
    https://www.societyofblackarchaeologists.com/



    Society for Historical Archaeology
    a professional organization of scholars concerned with the archaeology of the modern world
    https://sha.org/



    Historical archaeology
    a form of archaeology dealing with places, things, and issues from the past or present when written records and oral traditions can inform and contextualize cultural material
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_archaeology



    Antioch Colony
    a community in Texas founded by former slaves in 1870
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antioch_Colony,_Texas
    https://www.facebook.com/AntiochColony/
    https://news.utexas.edu/2010/09/20/artifacts-descendants-tell-story-of-freed-slaves-in-texas/
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqQMsIjVDW8





    For more episodes and news, visit our website and social media pages.



    Blog: http://archaeocafe.kvasirpublishing.com/archaeoblog/

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archaeocafe/

    Anchor: https://anchor.fm/archaeocafe

    • 57 min

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