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Classical Music Discoveries Classical Music Discoveries

    • Music
    • 4.0 • 8 Ratings

Proudly Sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival in Sarasota Florida and Uber

    17009 Haydn: Symphonies 13 - 16

    17009 Haydn: Symphonies 13 - 16

    There are 106 symphonies by the classical composer Joseph Haydn (1732–1809). Of these, 104 have numbers associated with them which were originally assigned by Eusebius Mandyczewski in 1908 in the chronological order that was known at the time.

    In the subsequent decades, numerous inaccuracies in the chronology (especially in the lower numbers) were found, but the Mandyczewski numbers were so widely used that when Anthony van Hoboken compiled his catalogue of Haydn's works, he incorporated the Mandyczewski number into Catalogue I (e.g., Symphony No. 34 is listed as Hob. I/34). Also in that time period, two additional symphonies were discovered (which were assigned non-Mandyczewskian letters "A" and "B"), bringing the total to 106.

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    • 1 hr 17 min
    17008 Handel: L'Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato

    17008 Handel: L'Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato

    Handel composed the work over the period of 19 January to 4 February 1740, and the work was premiered on 27 February 1740 at the Royal Theatre of Lincoln's Inn Fields. At the urging of one of Handel's librettists, Charles Jennens, Milton's two poems, L'Allegro and il Penseroso, were arranged by James Harris, interleaving them to create dramatic tension between the personified characters of Milton's poems (L'Allegro or the "Joyful man" and il Penseroso or the "Contemplative man"). The first two movements consist of this dramatic dialog between Milton's poems. In an attempt to unite the two poems into a singular "moral design", at Handel's request, Jennens added a new poem, "il Moderato", to create a third movement. The popular concluding aria and chorus, "As Steals the Morn" is adapted from Shakespeare's Tempest, V.i.65–68.

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    • 2 hrs 3 min
    17007 Haydn: The Seasons (Die Jahreszeiten)

    17007 Haydn: The Seasons (Die Jahreszeiten)

    The Seasons (German: Die Jahreszeiten), Hob. XXI:3) is a secular oratorio by Joseph Haydn, first performed in 1801.

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    • 2 hrs 17 min
    Shostakovich: Symphony No. 12 in D minor, Op. 112

    Shostakovich: Symphony No. 12 in D minor, Op. 112

    Dmitri Shostakovich composed his Symphony No. 12 in D minor, Op. 112, subtitled The Year of 1917, in 1961, dedicating it to the memory of Vladimir Lenin, leader of the Bolshevik Revolution, as he did his Symphony No. 2. The symphony was premiered that October by the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra under conductor Yevgeny Mravinsky. This was the last Shostakovich symphony Mravinsky premiered; his refusal to give the first performance of the Thirteenth Symphony, Babi Yar, caused a permanent strain in their working relationship.

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    • 40 min
    15145 Shostakovich 10 and Tchaikovsky 5

    15145 Shostakovich 10 and Tchaikovsky 5

    Shostakovich: Symphony 10
    Tchaikovsky: Symphony 5

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    • 1 hr 47 min
    17005 Handel: Israel in Egypt, HWV 54

    17005 Handel: Israel in Egypt, HWV 54

    Israel in Egypt (HWV 54) is a biblical oratorio by the composer George Frideric Handel. Most scholars believe the libretto was prepared by Charles Jennens, who also compiled the biblical texts for Handel's Messiah. It is composed entirely of selected passages from the Old Testament, mainly from Exodus and the Psalms.

    Israel in Egypt premiered at London's King's Theatre in the Haymarket on April 4, 1739 with Élisabeth Duparc "La Francesina", William Savage, John Beard (tenor), Turner Robinson, Gustavus Waltz, and Thomas Reinhold. Handel started it soon after the opera season at King's Theatre was cancelled for lack of subscribers. The oratorio was not well received by the first audience though commended in the Daily Post; the second performance was shortened, the mainly choral work now augmented with Italian-style arias.

    The first version of the piece is in three parts rather than two, the first part more famous as "The ways of Zion do mourn", with altered text as "The sons of Israel do mourn" lamenting the death of Joseph. This section precedes the Exodus, which in the three-part version is Part II rather than Part I.

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    • 2 hrs 5 min

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5
8 Ratings

8 Ratings

Will Fun 0681 ,

Not Bad

I personally really like the choice selections for the podcasts. There is a wide variety, and they all fit really well.

Being someone who has their masters (ARCT) in Piano Performance, I find that the host tends to “read off a paper” rather than speaking from clear knowledge.

Very good Podcast overall though 😀

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