63 episodes

Dr Alice Evans and leading experts discuss growth, governance, & gender inequalities.

Alice is a Lecturer at King's College London, and Faculty Associate at the Harvard Kennedy School.

ROCKING OUR PRIORS Dr Alice Evans

    • Education
    • 4.5, 2 Ratings

Dr Alice Evans and leading experts discuss growth, governance, & gender inequalities.

Alice is a Lecturer at King's College London, and Faculty Associate at the Harvard Kennedy School.

    Video: "The Decline and Rise of Democracy"

    Video: "The Decline and Rise of Democracy"

    Here's the video of my interview with Professor Stasavage: https://youtu.be/T9VCP6ENJ6w

    We discuss his new book, "The Decline & Rise of Democracy".

    • 28 sec
    "The Decline and Rise of Democracy": Professor David Stasavage

    "The Decline and Rise of Democracy": Professor David Stasavage

    Crops, technology, & exit options influenced whether societies became democratic or authoritarian - argues Professor David Stasavage.

    Rulers wanted to tax their people at the right level: extract the maximum revenue without making the goose hiss! Their strategy would depend on crop yields and technology.

    If caloric output is easy to predict (owing to stable temperature, irrigation, and other technology), rulers could easily calculate the agrarian surplus.

    But if caloric output varies each year (owing to changing weather patterns and primitive technology), prediction is difficult.

    Leaders could overcome these informational constraints either by surveying with bureaucrats or by soliciting council governance. Bureaucracies and councils performed the same role: providing information on crop yields.

    If rulers lacked bureaucratic technology, they would solicit council governance, to ascertain how much to tax. This gave rise to large-scale representative governance - argues Stasavage.

    In this podcast, we discuss whether this theory explains the dearth of democracy in China and MENA today, and the rise of the Communal Movement in Europe.

    It's a great read, though I remain sceptical.. There remains a further question: why were European but not Chinese or MENA societies able to collectively organise, and secure democratising reforms?

    Curious? Buy the book: https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691177465/the-decline-and-rise-of-democracy

    Further readings:

    Greif & Tabellini: http://piketty.pse.ens.fr/files/GreifTabellini.pdf
    Joe Henrich: https://weirdpeople.fas.harvard.edu/
    Jonathan Schulz & others: https://science.sciencemag.org/content/366/6466/eaau5141/tab-article-info
    Frank Fukuyama: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Origins-Political-Order-Prehuman-Revolution/dp/1846682576
    Klaus Mühlhahn: https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674737358

    • 41 min
    Video - The Rise & Fall of the Male Breadwinner

    Video - The Rise & Fall of the Male Breadwinner

    I've made a special episode of Rocking Our Priors.
    It's a video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgnluTjB-YE
    Enjoy!

    So, which do you prefer? Audio or video?

    • 13 sec
    The Rise & Fall of the Male Breadwinner

    The Rise & Fall of the Male Breadwinner

    Today I discuss 3 fantastic new books on work, families, and social change - C19-21.

    'Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving', by Caitlyn Collins https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691178851/making-motherhood-work
    'Double Lives: A History of Working Motherhood', by Helen McCarthy
    www.bloomsbury.com/uk/double-lives-9781408870761/
    'Bread Winner: An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy' by Emma Griffin.
    yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300230062/bread-winner

    Also mentioned:

    'Women's labour force participation in nineteenth‐century England and Wales'
    onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ehr.12876
    'The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women’s Employment,
    Education, and Family' by Claudia Goldin
    https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/goldin/files/the_quiet_revolution_that_transformed_womens_employment_education_and_family.pdf
    'Changes in the Labour Supply of Married Women' by Francine Blau and Lawrence Kahn
    www.nber.org/papers/w11230.pdf
    'From ‘MeToo’ to Boko Haram: A survey of levels and trends of gender inequality in the world' by Stephan Klasen
    https://www.nber.org/papers/w11230.pdf
    'Women Forget That Men are the Masters : Gender Antagonism and Socio-economic Change in Kisii District, Kenya', by Margrethe Silberschmidt
    www.bookdepository.com/book/9789171064394

    • 18 min
    "China's Gilded Age: The Paradox of Economic Boom & Vast Corruption". Professor Yuen Yuen Ang

    "China's Gilded Age: The Paradox of Economic Boom & Vast Corruption". Professor Yuen Yuen Ang

    Why has China grown so fast for so long despite vast corruption?

    In China's Gilded Age, Professor Ang argues that not all types of corruption hurt growth, nor do they cause the same kind of harm. Ang reveals that the rise of capitalism was not accompanied by the eradication of corruption, but rather by its evolution from thuggery and theft to access money. In doing so, she challenges the way we think about corruption and capitalism, not only in China but around the world.

    This is an excerpt, read by Alice Evans.

    Professor Ang tweets @yuenyuenang
    Book details: https://sites.lsa.umich.edu/yy-ang/chinas-gilded-age/

    • 44 min
    "Bread Winner: An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy". Professor Emma Griffin

    "Bread Winner: An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy". Professor Emma Griffin

    Nineteenth century Britain saw remarkable economic growth and a rise in real wages. But not everyone shared in the nation’s wealth. Unable to earn a sufficient income themselves, working-class women were reliant on the ‘breadwinner wage’ of their husbands. When income failed, or was denied or squandered by errant men, families could be plunged into desperate poverty from which there was no escape.

    Emma Griffin unlocks the homes of Victorian England to examine the lives – and finances – of the people who lived there. Drawing on over 600 working-class autobiographies, including more than 200 written by women, Bread Winner changes our understanding of daily life in Victorian Britain.

    The book: https://yalebooks.co.uk/display.asp?k=9780300230062
    https://people.uea.ac.uk/e_griffin
    Professor Griffin's homepage: https://people.uea.ac.uk/e_griffin
    On Twitter: @EmmaGriffinHist

    This podcast is a few audio chapters, read by Dr Alice Evans.

    • 54 min

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