21 episodes

Welcome to Friends Who Argue, a podcast for the litigation bar brought to you by The Advocates’ Society and hosted by our Young Advocates' and 10+ Standing Committees. Friends Who Argue features intimate conversations with advocates from across Canada, who will share stories from their journeys as advocates. As litigators, we live in an adversarial world but we all have one thing in common - we are officers of the court who are passionate about the profession of law and advocating for our clients. We hope you find these conversations informative, inspiring and most of all, entertaining. By Advocates. For Advocates. Land Acknowledgement: The Advocates’ Society acknowledges that our offices, located in Toronto, are on the customary and traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishinabek, the Huron-Wendat and now home to many First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples. We acknowledge current treaty holders, the Mississaugas of the Credit and honour their long history of welcoming many nations to this territory. While The Advocates’ Society is based in Toronto, we are a national organization with Directors and members located across Canada in the treaty and traditional territories of many Indigenous Peoples. We encourage our members to reflect upon their relationships with the Indigenous Peoples in these territories, and the history of the land on which they live and work. We acknowledge the devastating impacts of colonization, including the history of residential schools, for many Indigenous peoples, families, and communities and commit to fostering diversity, equity, and inclusiveness in an informed legal profession in Canada and within The Advocates’ Society.

Friends Who Argue Various

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 9 Ratings

Welcome to Friends Who Argue, a podcast for the litigation bar brought to you by The Advocates’ Society and hosted by our Young Advocates' and 10+ Standing Committees. Friends Who Argue features intimate conversations with advocates from across Canada, who will share stories from their journeys as advocates. As litigators, we live in an adversarial world but we all have one thing in common - we are officers of the court who are passionate about the profession of law and advocating for our clients. We hope you find these conversations informative, inspiring and most of all, entertaining. By Advocates. For Advocates. Land Acknowledgement: The Advocates’ Society acknowledges that our offices, located in Toronto, are on the customary and traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishinabek, the Huron-Wendat and now home to many First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples. We acknowledge current treaty holders, the Mississaugas of the Credit and honour their long history of welcoming many nations to this territory. While The Advocates’ Society is based in Toronto, we are a national organization with Directors and members located across Canada in the treaty and traditional territories of many Indigenous Peoples. We encourage our members to reflect upon their relationships with the Indigenous Peoples in these territories, and the history of the land on which they live and work. We acknowledge the devastating impacts of colonization, including the history of residential schools, for many Indigenous peoples, families, and communities and commit to fostering diversity, equity, and inclusiveness in an informed legal profession in Canada and within The Advocates’ Society.

    Introduction to Indigenous Law and Legal Orders – Part 2: The Way Forward

    Introduction to Indigenous Law and Legal Orders – Part 2: The Way Forward

    In Part 2 of this two-part series, our panel continues their discussion on Indigenous laws and legal traditions, with a focus on the way forward. They discuss some of the work that is already taking place in Indigenous communities to revitalize Indigenous legal traditions and to  exercise governance authority within the Canadian context more broadly, including over water. They also discuss some of the opportunities for more areas of Indigenous jurisdiction, and how to take steps to implement the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.   

    Aimée Craft is an Indigenous (Anishinaabe-Métis) lawyer from Treaty 1 territory in Manitoba and an award-winning professor and researcher at the University of Ottawa. Since 2013, Professor Craft has led research on Anishinaabe water law. Her award-winning book, Breathing Life Into the Stone Fort Treaty, focuses on understanding and interpreting treaties from an Anishinaabe inaakonigewin (legal) perspective. Professor Craft is the former Director of Research at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls and the founding Director of Research at the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation. She is a current member of the Speaker's Bureau of the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba.
    Professor Alan Hanna is an Assistant Professor at the University of Victoria, where he teaches in both the JD and the JID programs. He is of mixed Blackfoot, French and Scottish heritage, and is connected to the Secwepemc through marriage. Professor Hanna’s research focuses on Indigenous laws and jurisdiction, governance, rights and title, and environmental sustainability under Indigenous legal traditions, Aboriginal law and jurisprudence, and the intersections between all these systems. Professor Hanna also sits on the Legal Advisory Panel of RAVEN Trust and the Board of Directors of the Indigenous Bar Association in Canada.
    Christina Gray is a lawyer with JFK Law LLP, with a focus on litigation and Indigenous governance. Christina is a Ts’msyen citizen from Lax Kw’alaams in northern British Columbia and Dene from Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories. As a scholar, Christina’s graduate research focuses on issues of gender representation within the Ts’msyen legal order and governance system. Christina is also a Yellowhead Institute Research Fellow, which is a First Nations-led think tank rooted in community networks and committed to Indigenous self-determination.
    Aria Laskin practices Aboriginal, environmental and constitutional law in JFK Law LLP’s Vancouver office. She has appeared in front of all levels of court in British Columbia and Ontario, the Federal Court, the Supreme Court of Canada and a range of administrative and arbitral panels.

    Land Acknowledgement
    The Advocates’ Society acknowledges that our offices, located in Toronto, are on the customary and traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishinabek, the Huron-Wendat and now home to many First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples.  We acknowledge current treaty holders, the Mississaugas of the Credit and honour their long history of welcoming many nations to this territory.
     
    While The Advocates’ Society is based in Toronto, we are a national organization with Directors and members located across Canada in the treaty and traditional territories of many Indigenous Peoples. We encourage our members to reflect upon their relationships with the Indigenous Peoples in these territories, and the history of the land on which they live and work.
     
    We acknowledge the devastating impacts of colonization, including the history of residential schools, for many Indigenous peoples, families, and communities and commit to fostering diversity, equity, and inclusiveness in an informed legal profession in Canada and within The Advocates’ Society.

    • 59 min
    Introduction to Indigenous Law and Legal Orders – Part 1: Introducing Indigenous Legal Orders and Indigenous – Western Legal System Interactions

    Introduction to Indigenous Law and Legal Orders – Part 1: Introducing Indigenous Legal Orders and Indigenous – Western Legal System Interactions

    In Part 1 of this two-part series, Aria Laskin speaks with Prof. Aimée Craft, Prof. Alan Hanna and Christina Gray about Indigenous laws and legal orders, and the interactions of those systems with Western legal traditions. The panelists introduce the concept of Indigenous laws and legal orders, and some of the key pillars of Anishinaabe law. They also discuss the distinction between Indigenous and Aboriginal law, and the historic treatment of Indigenous legal systems by the Canadian state.
    Aimée Craft is an Indigenous (Anishinaabe-Métis) lawyer from Treaty 1 territory in Manitoba and an award-winning professor and researcher at the University of Ottawa. Since 2013, Professor Craft has led research on Anishinaabe water law. Her award-winning book, Breathing Life Into the Stone Fort Treaty, focuses on understanding and interpreting treaties from an Anishinaabe inaakonigewin (legal) perspective. Professor Craft is the former Director of Research at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls and the founding Director of Research at the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation. She is a current member of the Speaker's Bureau of the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba.
    Professor Alan Hanna is an Assistant Professor at the University of Victoria, where he teaches in both the JD and the JID programs. He is of mixed Blackfoot, French and Scottish heritage, and is connected to the Secwepemc through marriage. Professor Hanna’s research focuses on Indigenous laws and jurisdiction, governance, rights and title, and environmental sustainability under Indigenous legal traditions, Aboriginal law and jurisprudence, and the intersections between all these systems. Professor Hanna also sits on the Legal Advisory Panel of RAVEN Trust and the Board of Directors of the Indigenous Bar Association in Canada.
    Christina Gray is a lawyer with JFK Law LLP, with a focus on litigation and Indigenous governance. Christina is a Ts’msyen citizen from Lax Kw’alaams in northern British Columbia and Dene from Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories. As a scholar, Christina’s graduate research focuses on issues of gender representation within the Ts’msyen legal order and governance system. Christina is also a Yellowhead Institute Research Fellow, which is a First Nations-led think tank rooted in community networks and committed to Indigenous self-determination.
    Aria Laskin practices Aboriginal, environmental and constitutional law in JFK Law LLP’s Vancouver office. She has appeared in front of all levels of court in British Columbia and Ontario, the Federal Court, the Supreme Court of Canada and a range of administrative and arbitral panels. 

    Land Acknowledgement
    The Advocates’ Society acknowledges that our offices, located in Toronto, are on the customary and traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishinabek, the Huron-Wendat and now home to many First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples.  We acknowledge current treaty holders, the Mississaugas of the Credit and honour their long history of welcoming many nations to this territory.
     
    While The Advocates’ Society is based in Toronto, we are a national organization with Directors and members located across Canada in the treaty and traditional territories of many Indigenous Peoples. We encourage our members to reflect upon their relationships with the Indigenous Peoples in these territories, and the history of the land on which they live and work.
     
    We acknowledge the devastating impacts of colonization, including the history of residential schools, for many Indigenous peoples, families, and communities and commit to fostering diversity, equity, and inclusiveness in an informed legal profession in Canada and within The Advocates’ Society.

    • 33 min
    Interview with Award of Justice Recipient David Nahwegahbow

    Interview with Award of Justice Recipient David Nahwegahbow

    In this episode, Kathleen Lickers, IPC, LSM interviews David Nahwegahbow, IPC, LSM,  the 2021 recipient of The Advocates' Society's Award of Justice. In their fascinating and highly informative conversation, Kathleen and David discuss litigating Aboriginal rights issues from the inception of the Charter up to recent and ongoing litigation during the COVID-19 Pandemic.

    David C. Nahwegahbow, IPC, LSM
    David Nahwegahbow is the 2021 recipient of The Award of Justice, and a former director of The Advocates’ Society.  Called to the Ontario Bar in 1982, he is the founding partner of Nahwegahbow, Corbiere Genoodmagejig Barristers & Solicitors. David is also a founding member and former President of the Indigenous Bar Association (IBA); and in 2003, he received the "IPC" designation (Indigenous Peoples' Counsel) from the IBA in recognition for his advocacy work on behalf of Indigenous peoples.  He received a National Aboriginal Achievement Award for Law and Justice in 2008.  Shortly thereafter, he was presented with the Anishinabek Lifetime Achievement Award from the Union of Ontario Indians which recognizes the dedication of individuals who have devoted their lives to the service of their communities and the Anishinabek Nation.  In 2010, Mr. Nahwegahbow was inducted into the Common Law Honour Society of the University of Ottawa's Faculty of Law, the Common Law Section's most prestigious Alumni distinction.  In 2011, Mr. Nahwegahbow received the Law Society Medal, an award granted by the Law Society to selected lawyers who have made a significant contribution to the profession.

    Kathleen Lickers, IPC, LSM
    Recently awarded the Law Society Medal, Kathleen Lickers is a Seneca from Six Nations of the Grand River and sole practitioner, operating her own law practice at Six Nations.  She is widely recognized for her work in Indigenous Affairs. She has served on the board of the Indigenous Bar Association of Canada and has been described by other Indigenous leaders as a role model for Indigenous youth.  Kathleen is renowned for her expert counsel and as an accomplished negotiator between Indigenous agencies, First Nation governments and federal and provincial ministries.  Former co-chair of the Indigenous Advisory Group to the Law Society of Ontario, Kathleen currently serves on the Board of the Advocates Society and is frequently sought after for her skillful mediating in multi-party, multi-table complex negotiations.

    Learning Resources from The Advocates' Society
    Guide for Lawyers Working with Indigenous Peoples
    Guide pour les avocats qui travaillent avec des parties autochtones

    Land Acknowledgement
    The Advocates’ Society acknowledges that our offices, located in Toronto, are on the customary and traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishinabek, the Huron-Wendat and now home to many First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples.  We acknowledge current treaty holders, the Mississaugas of the Credit and honour their long history of welcoming many nations to this territory.
     
    While The Advocates’ Society is based in Toronto, we are a national organization with Directors and members located across Canada in the treaty and traditional territories of many Indigenous Peoples. We encourage our members to reflect upon their relationships with the Indigenous Peoples in these territories, and the history of the land on which they live and work.
     
    We acknowledge the devastating impacts of colonization, including the history of residential schools, for many Indigenous peoples, families, and communities and commit to fostering diversity, equity, and inclusiveness in an informed legal profession in Canada and within The Advocates’ Society.

    • 37 min
    Excellence in Advocacy – An Interview with Sarit Batner

    Excellence in Advocacy – An Interview with Sarit Batner

    Excellence in Advocacy – An Interview with Sarit Batner
    Sarit Batner (McCarthy Tetrault LLP) is the 2020 recipient of the Douglas K. Laidlaw Medal for Excellence in Advocacy. In this episode of Friends Who Argue, Chloe Snider (Dentons Canada LLP) interviews Sarit Batner about what makes for excellent oral advocacy, whether oral advocacy is still important, and how Zoom may be changing advocacy. Sarit also shares her journey to becoming a distinguished oral advocate and key oral advocacy tips.
    Sarit E. Batner is a partner in McCarthy Tétrault LLP’s Toronto Litigation Group, and a former member of the firm’s Board of Partners. She is a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, the International Academy of Trial Lawyers and the Litigation Counsel of America. Sarit maintains a significant trial and appellant litigation practice, with a focus on complex commercial litigation and arbitrations. Sarit has experience before courts of appeal, including as lead counsel before the Supreme Court of Canada. She has received a number of accolades, including being listed as a leading litigation lawyer in Lexpert, Benchmark, and Chambers Canada.
    Chloe Snider is a partner in Dentons’ Litigation and Dispute Resolution and Transformative Technologies groups. Chloe’s practice focuses on complex commercial litigation and arbitration, with particular expertise in information and technology disputes. Chloe is a business advisor to local, national and global clients, assisting them in managing risk in corporate transactions and commercial relationships. Chloe has been recognized for corporate commercial litigation in Best Lawyers in Canada and Lexpert.

    Land Acknowledgement
    The Advocates’ Society acknowledges that our offices, located in Toronto, are on the customary and traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishinabek, the Huron-Wendat and now home to many First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples.  We acknowledge current treaty holders, the Mississaugas of the Credit and honour their long history of welcoming many nations to this territory.
     
    While The Advocates’ Society is based in Toronto, we are a national organization with Directors and members located across Canada in the treaty and traditional territories of many Indigenous Peoples. We encourage our members to reflect upon their relationships with the Indigenous Peoples in these territories, and the history of the land on which they live and work.
     
    We acknowledge the devastating impacts of colonization, including the history of residential schools, for many Indigenous peoples, families, and communities and commit to fostering diversity, equity, and inclusiveness in an informed legal profession in Canada and within The Advocates’ Society.

    • 36 min
    Behind the Scenes Look at TAS’s Modern Advocacy Task Force - Part 2

    Behind the Scenes Look at TAS’s Modern Advocacy Task Force - Part 2

    On this episode of Friends Who Argue, we’re sharing Part 2 of our behind-the-scenes look at the work of The Advocates’ Society’s Modern Advocacy Task Force and its final report, the Right to be Heard: The Future of Advocacy in Canada. Task Force member Alex Shelley interviews Advocates' Society president Deborah Palter and Advocates' Society Director Peter Osborne (who chaired the Task Force) about the findings of the report. We encourage you to listen to Part 1 first, for a discussion about how the report was conceived, researched and drafted.
    Download a copy of the Task Force’s final report here: digital version / print-friendly version.

    Alexandra Shelley is a senior associate at Torys LLP. Her practice focuses on litigation and dispute resolution in a variety of areas, including corporate/commercial litigation, securities, construction and real estate.

    Deborah E. Palter is a partner at Thornton Grout Finnigan LLP and President of The Advocates' Society. She is recognized as a leading advocate with a broad commercial litigation practice.  She regularly acts for individuals, corporations and financial institutions providing creative advice and strategies for litigating and resolving complicated business disputes.

    Peter Osborne is a partner at Lenczner Slaght LLP and sits on the TAS Board of Directors. He is one of Canada’s leading trial and appellate counsel and a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. His advocacy practice includes securities matters, commercial disputes, insolvency and restructuring cases, class actions, governance issues and advice. Peter is a regular instructor for CLE programs of The Advocates' Society.

    Land Acknowledgement
    The Advocates’ Society acknowledges that our offices, located in Toronto, are on the customary and traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishinabek, the Huron-Wendat and now home to many First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples.  We acknowledge current treaty holders, the Mississaugas of the Credit and honour their long history of welcoming many nations to this territory.
     
    While The Advocates’ Society is based in Toronto, we are a national organization with Directors and members located across Canada in the treaty and traditional territories of many Indigenous Peoples. We encourage our members to reflect upon their relationships with the Indigenous Peoples in these territories, and the history of the land on which they live and work.
     
    We acknowledge the devastating impacts of colonization, including the history of residential schools, for many Indigenous peoples, families, and communities and commit to fostering diversity, equity, and inclusiveness in an informed legal profession in Canada and within The Advocates’ Society.

    • 50 min
    Behind the Scenes Look at TAS’s Modern Advocacy Task Force - Part 1

    Behind the Scenes Look at TAS’s Modern Advocacy Task Force - Part 1

    On this episode of Friend Who Argue, we’re sharing Part 1 of our behind-the-scenes look at the work of The Advocates’ Society’s (TAS) Modern Advocacy Task Force (MATF) and its final report, the Right to be Heard: The Future of Advocacy in Canada. Task Force member Alex Shelley interviews TAS president Deborah E. Palter and TAS Director and MATF Chair Peter Osborne about how the report was conceived, researched and drafted. Listen to Part 2 for a discussion about the findings of the report.

    Download a copy of the Task Force’s final report here: digital version / print-friendly version.
    Alexandra Shelley is a senior associate at Torys LLP. Her practice focuses on litigation and dispute resolution in a variety of areas, including corporate/commercial litigation, securities, construction and real estate.

    Deborah E. Palter is a partner at Thornton Grout Finnigan LLP and President of The Advocates' Society. She is recognized as a leading advocate with a broad commercial litigation practice.  She regularly acts for individuals, corporations and financial institutions providing creative advice and strategies for litigating and resolving complicated business disputes. 

    Peter Osborne is a partner at Lenczner Slaght LLP and sits on the TAS Board of Directors. He is one of Canada’s leading trial and appellate counsel and a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. His advocacy practice includes securities matters, commercial disputes, insolvency and restructuring cases, class actions, governance issues and advice. Peter is a regular instructor for CLE programs of The Advocates' Society.

    Land Acknowledgement
    The Advocates’ Society acknowledges that our offices, located in Toronto, are on the customary and traditional lands of the Mississaugas of the Credit, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishinabek, the Huron-Wendat and now home to many First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples.  We acknowledge current treaty holders, the Mississaugas of the Credit and honour their long history of welcoming many nations to this territory.
     
    While The Advocates’ Society is based in Toronto, we are a national organization with Directors and members located across Canada in the treaty and traditional territories of many Indigenous Peoples. We encourage our members to reflect upon their relationships with the Indigenous Peoples in these territories, and the history of the land on which they live and work.
     
    We acknowledge the devastating impacts of colonization, including the history of residential schools, for many Indigenous peoples, families, and communities and commit to fostering diversity, equity, and inclusiveness in an informed legal profession in Canada and within The Advocates’ Society.

    • 39 min

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9 Ratings

9 Ratings

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