8 episodes

A podcast hosted by Dan George, member of the Gilseyhu Clan (Big Frog – Thin House) of the Wet’suwet’en people, acclaimed Indigenous facilitator and strategist for over 30 years, and President/CEO of Four Directions Management Services. Reconciliation Road is a journey towards a greater understanding for reconciling the competing values and viewpoints of Indigenous Peoples, Industry, and the Crown. With each episode, Dan leads his audience thorough conversations with game-changers, inspiring leaders, and movers and shakers in his efforts to strengthen our most valuable and transformational relationships in this country – those with Indigenous Peoples. Producer: Kelly Mortimer | kellymortimer@fdms.ca

Reconciliation Road Dan George, Four Directions Management Services

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

A podcast hosted by Dan George, member of the Gilseyhu Clan (Big Frog – Thin House) of the Wet’suwet’en people, acclaimed Indigenous facilitator and strategist for over 30 years, and President/CEO of Four Directions Management Services. Reconciliation Road is a journey towards a greater understanding for reconciling the competing values and viewpoints of Indigenous Peoples, Industry, and the Crown. With each episode, Dan leads his audience thorough conversations with game-changers, inspiring leaders, and movers and shakers in his efforts to strengthen our most valuable and transformational relationships in this country – those with Indigenous Peoples. Producer: Kelly Mortimer | kellymortimer@fdms.ca

    Episode 8: Bruce McIvor

    Episode 8: Bruce McIvor

    Reconciliation is a journey, not a destination. The road to reconciliation is a long and winding one with many stops along the way. When we come together, great things happen. Thank you for joining me on this journey.  
    My guest for this episode is Dr. Bruce McIvor. Bruce is a partner at First Peoples Law LLP.  Bruce is recognized nationally and internationally as a leading practitioner of Aboriginal law in Canada.  He is a member of the Manitoba Métis Federation.
    Bruce understands the importance of reconciliation more than most – he’s written an entire book on it. He just published his new book: “Standoff: Why Reconciliation Fails Indigenous People and How to Fix It”. In this incredible book, Bruce articulates what Indigenous peoples in this country know so well and what can be clearly seen to all Canadians if they are paying attention to the constant stream of news reports of standoffs and confrontations, Canada’s “reconciliation project” has obviously gone off the rails. In this series of concise and thoughtful essays, Bruce explains why reconciliation with Indigenous peoples is failing and what needs to be done to fix it. 
    Bruce’s message is consistent and powerful: if Canadians are brave enough to confront the reality of the country’s colonialist past and present and insist that politicians replace empty promises with concrete, meaningful change, there is a realistic path forward based on respect, recognition and the implementation of Indigenous rights.

    • 42 min
    Episode 7: Dr. Bonnie Henry and Dr. Danièle Behn Smith

    Episode 7: Dr. Bonnie Henry and Dr. Danièle Behn Smith

    The focus of our program is reconciliation in all its forms. We seek solutions and encourage our listeners and supporters to look at old problems through new eyes. 
    Seeing with new eyes is an approach which tries to take a fresh look at something, bypassing the pattern  recognition and seeing the issue with a different perspective. Such an approach is critical if we are to  work and walk together on the road of reconciliation.
    We well know that leadership matters. It is essential in every sector, in every community, and in every country. In these times of unprecedented change, organizations, communities, and governments need more leaders and now more than ever we need leaders who can unite and mobilize others in a common cause. 
    In our BC Health Care System, we have the Office of the Provincial Health Officer, a team that is tasked with overseeing the health of British Columbians and advising on public health concerns and situations to our ministers and public bodies. 
    “Be Kind, Be Calm, Be Safe” is something the Office of the Provincial Health Officer is also known for  now, words many British Columbians became familiar with during the pandemic, words that still ring  true today. This sentiment comes from our Provincial Health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and her team, a sort of slogan now for many people across our province.
    Today we are so happy to have both Dr. Bonnie Henry, BC Provincial Health Officer and Dr. Danièle Behn Smith, Deputy Provincial Health Officer, Indigenous Health with us; two pivotal figures in the health and wellness of citizens in BC today. They have worked tirelessly through the pandemic, devoting themselves to protecting the citizens of BC, and are monumental in the efforts to improve access to equal health care and wellness for Indigenous communities. 
    Our province is at a turning point in how we address racism and colonial views intertwined with our healthcare system and Dr. Henry and Dr. Behn Smith are both playing important roles in this shift and how the future of equal access to health care and community wellness will look for Indigenous Peoples  in British Columbia moving forward. With this I am happy to welcome Dr. Henry and Dr. Behn Smith to our show!
    In the recording of this episode, Dr. Henry and Dr. Behn Smith joined us from and respectfully acknowledged their gratitude to work and reside in the traditional territories of the Lekwungen peoples and the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations.

    • 58 min
    Episode 6: Kukpi7 Mike LeBourdais

    Episode 6: Kukpi7 Mike LeBourdais

    Reconciliation is a journey, not a destination. The road to reconciliation is a long and winding one with many stops along the way. When we come together, great things happen. My guest for this episode is Kukpi7 Mike LeBourdais. Becoming an effective leader is a character trait that many people strive for. Kukpi7 LeBourdais is a game changer, a trailblazer, and a truly effective leader I am grateful to know and learn from!

    Kukpi7 Mike LeBourdais is Kukpi7 (Chief) of Whispering Pines/Clinton Indian Band. He is Executive Vice President for the Western Indigenous Pipeline Group, Chairman of Tulo Centre of Indigenous Economics, and sits as a Director for Cayoose Creek Developments. Kukip7 LeBourdais has served as Director of All Nations Trust Company, Chairman of the Native Economic Development Advisory Board, Co-Chairman of the Shuswap Nation Tribal Council, and Business Development Officer for the Community Futures Development Corporation of Central Interiors First Nations.

    Kukpi7 LeBourdais brings a wealth of knowledge and skill with him having worked with First Nations in Canada, the USA ,and New Zealand. He has experience working in jurisdiction, taxation, forestry, pipelines, revenue sharing, independent risk assessment, and more. Kukpi Mike is heavily invested in the acquisition of the Trans Mountain Pipeline by the Indigenous communities along its route; seeing the returns brought back into the rightful territories who are bearing the risk with this expansion. He is an outspoken and passionate voice for the advancement of Aboriginal title and rights and a tireless advocate working to see the benefits of natural resources and protection of the environment in Indigenous traditional territories returned to its people.

    Enjoy, stay safe, and keep standing in the light! Mussi Cho!

    • 53 min
    Episode 5: Minister Nathan Cullen

    Episode 5: Minister Nathan Cullen

    The focus of our program is reconciliation in all its forms. We seek solutions and encourage our listeners and supporters to look at old problems through new eyes.  
    Seeing with new eyes is an approach which tries to take a fresh look at something, bypassing the pattern recognition and seeing the issue with a different perspective. Such an approach is critical if we are to work and walk together on the road of reconciliation.
     We well know that leadership matters. It is essential in every sector, in every community, and in every country. In these times of unprecedented change, organizations, communities, and governments need more leaders and now more than ever we need leaders who can unite and mobilize others in a common cause. 
    My guest for today’s edition of Reconciliation Road is none other than Nathan Cullen. Nathan was elected MLA for Stikine in the 2020 provincial election. He is also the Minister of State for Lands and Natural Resource Operations, the Chair of the Environment and Land Use Committee and a member of the Cabinet Committee on Economy.
    Previously, Mr. Cullen served as a member of Parliament in the Skeena-Bulkley Valley for 15 years from 2014 to 2019. Early in his career he worked in international development in Africa and South America during the 1990s on community economic development projects.
    Nathan lives in Smithers, in the heart of Wet’suwet’en territory, with his wife and twin sons.

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Episode 4: Niilo Edwards

    Episode 4: Niilo Edwards

    Welcome to Reconciliation Road! My guest today is Niilo Edwards. Niilo Edwards is the Executive Director of the First Nations Major Project Coalition, a national First Nation led not-for-profit business capacity organization. Niilo joined the organization as Executive Director upon establishment in 2017.
     He is responsible for the overall organizational strategy including the management of the technical services provided to Coalition members to assist them in participating in major infrastructure projects on a commercial basis across Canada. Prior to this role, Niilo served as an advisor to the First Nations Financial Management Board, one of the institutions created under the First Nations Fiscal Management Act.  
     In 2019, Niilo was appointed to the University of Ottawa’s Positive Energy Advisory Council for Canadian energy policy. In 2020 he joined the board of directors of the Canadian Council for Public-Private Partnerships.

    Check out more of Niilo's exciting work at http://fnmpc.ca 

    • 47 min
    Episode 3: Chief Sharleen Gale

    Episode 3: Chief Sharleen Gale

    Welcome to Reconciliation Road! My guest for our third episode is none other than Chief Sharleen Gale. Chief Gale has been an elected Councillor of the Fort Nelson First Nation since 2009. She is an active Indigenous leader, a member of the Fort Nelson First Nation, and envisions a future where all members are working together to become a strong, proud, healthy, and self-reliant Nation. 
     She is the grand-daughter of Fred Burke and Madeline Needlay. Her roots run deep in the lives of her people and she enjoys being on the land with her family exploring the territory and teaching her son the traditional ways on the lands and how to hunt, fish, and gather medicines and berries. 
    Chief Gale enjoys being out on the land with her family, exploring the territory, and teaching her son the traditional ways of how to hunt, fish, and gather medicines and berries during the seasonal rounds. 
    As a leader and Chief of the Nation, she understands the importance of a upholding the spirit and intent of the treaty by asserting her peoples’ rights to their land and taking responsibility for ensuring that our future generations are able to live their lives in their territory in a way that honours our ancestors. 
    Sharleen started her career in oil and gas working at the Fort Nelson gas plant in 1999 and she is currently on leave  while she leads her Nation. Her various roles working in Administration, Finance, Maintenance, Planning and in Leadership have given her extensive experience in the oil and gas sector, the corporate world and the vision to ensure our people are managing our lands and our resources in our territory to the benefit of our members. 
    Chief Gale is the Chair of the Deh Tai Corporation – the Nation’s economic arm to prosperity. Her people are looking at ways in which their economic development holdings can be diversified. This diversification is being pursued through a major geothermal electricity project and a partnership with Peak Renewables to diversify the forest industry in their territory.
    Dedicated to public service has always been a value of importance to Chief Gale and in 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic hit Canada, she was asked by Premier Horgan to serve on the BC Government Economic Recovery Task Force. As the only Indigenous leader named to the Task Force, this opportunity has her serving alongside other leaders in BC’s business community providing guidance and advice to the Premier and senior officials within the BC government concerning the economic recovery of the province during these unprecedented times.  
    Her experience in public service, as a professional working in the energy sector, and as an Indigenous community leader has provided her with a broad range of perspectives, knowledge, and depth on the interplay between Indigenous peoples and the energy sector in Canada.
    Sharleen is also the chair of the First Nations Major Projects Coalition (FNMPC) and believes that First Nations need to have the opportunity to have equity in major project infrastructure and access to meaningful financing for these projects happening in their territories. One that focuses on a balance approach of economic prosperity and environmental stewardship. 
    Several First Nations have formed the First Nations Major Projects Coalition for the purposes of examining how ownership of major resource projects on their lands could be facilitated and how environmental practices can be improved to meet their needs. The work of the First Nations Major Projects Coalition is directed through feedback received from the First Nations participating in the Coalition.

    • 47 min

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