110 episodes

Helping Runners Overcome Injuries and Smash PRs

My name is Matthew Boyd, I'm a Physiotherapist and Running Coach.

If you are injured and want some help, book a free call with us:

https://matthewboydphysio.com/booking/

The Adaptive Zone Matthew Boyd

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Helping Runners Overcome Injuries and Smash PRs

My name is Matthew Boyd, I'm a Physiotherapist and Running Coach.

If you are injured and want some help, book a free call with us:

https://matthewboydphysio.com/booking/

    From Knee Pain to Marathon PR | Marcela's Story

    From Knee Pain to Marathon PR | Marcela's Story

    Summary

    Marcela shares her journey into running, overcoming back and knee injuries, and achieving her goals. She started running during the pandemic and fell in love with the freedom and enjoyment it brought.



    Despite her initial concerns about her back, she reached out to Matthew Boyd for help and started training with him. She experienced setbacks with her knee but diligently followed the training plan and recovered quickly.



    Marcela successfully completed the Vancouver Marathon and is now preparing for the Mont Blanc race. Her story is inspiring and showcases the importance of perseverance and listening to your body.



    Takeaways


    Running can provide a sense of freedom and enjoyment, even for beginners.
    Overcoming injuries requires proper training and listening to your body.
    Diligence and perseverance are key to achieving running goals.
    Having a supportive coach can make a significant difference in performance and recovery.



    Chapters

    00:00 Marcela's Background in Running

    03:06 Overcoming Back Pain and Starting Running

    05:23 Seeking Help from Matthew Boyd

    08:20 The Mexico City Marathon Experience

    12:14 The 50k Race and Recovery

    14:57 Dealing with a Knee Setback

    20:47 The Vancouver Marathon Experience

    25:13 Preparing for the Mont Blanc Race



    Connect with Us:

    If you’re an injured runner we can help you get back to running pain-free.



    Book a free call with us:

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/booking/



    Running Fundamentals Course:

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/running-fundamentals-course/



    Instagram:

    https://www.instagram.com/matthewboydphysio/

    • 27 min
    How Do You Know What Your Race Pace Should Be?

    How Do You Know What Your Race Pace Should Be?

    If you’re an injured runner we can help you get back to running pain-free.



    Click the link to book a free call with us

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/booking/



    Running Fundamentals Course

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/running-fundamentals-course/



    Instagram

    https://www.instagram.com/matthewboydphysio/



    Summary

    This episode discusses how to determine your race pace for distances you haven't done before or haven't done in a long time. The method described involves doing fast finish long runs in the weeks leading up to the race.



    For a 10K, the last 15 minutes of the long run are done at race pace. For a half marathon, the last 30 minutes are done at race pace. And for a marathon, the last 30 minutes of the long run are done at race pace.



    The average pace during these fast finish portions is used to estimate the race pace. The episode also emphasizes the importance of pacing during the race and making a decision on whether to speed up or slow down at three-quarters of the race distance.



    Takeaways


    To determine your race pace for a new distance, do fast finish long runs in the weeks leading up to the race.
    For a 10K, do the last 15 minutes of the long run at race pace.
    For a half marathon, do the last 30 minutes of the long run at race pace.
    For a marathon, do the last 30 minutes of the long run at race pace.
    Use the average pace during the fast finish portion to estimate your race pace.
    During the race, aim for an even split or a negative split, running the same pace or faster in the second half of the race.
    Make a decision on whether to speed up or slow down at three-quarters of the race distance.

    • 16 min
    Carb Loading Calculator For Marathons

    Carb Loading Calculator For Marathons

    My Carb Loading Plan

    Carb Loading Calculator



    If you’re an injured runner we can help you get back to running pain-free.



    Click the link to book a free call with us

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/booking/



    Running Fundamentals Course

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/running-fundamentals-course/



    Instagram

    https://www.instagram.com/matthewboydphysio/



    Carb loading is the process of increasing carbohydrate intake in the days leading up to a long race to top up glycogen stores in the muscles. It helps prevent running out of carbohydrates during the race and improves performance. The recommended carb loading period is two days for a half marathon and three days for a marathon or longer. The type of food to eat during carb loading includes potatoes, pasta, rice, oatmeal, cereal, bread, bagels, fruits, veggies, candy, and sports drinks.



    High-fat foods like creamy pasta sauces, pizza, muffins, cakes, chocolate, and takeout food should be avoided or consumed in minimal amounts. Weight gain during carb loading is due to water weight, not fat. Rehearsing the carb loading plan prior to the race is recommended to get used to the food and make adjustments.



    The amount of carbs needed per day during carb loading can be calculated using a carb loading calculator and can be translated into palm-sized portions for easier visualization.

    • 10 min
    How do I Taper for a Race?

    How do I Taper for a Race?

    If you’re an injured runner we can help you get back to running pain-free.



    Click the link to book a free call with us

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/booking/



    Running Fundamentals Course

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/running-fundamentals-course/



    Instagram

    https://www.instagram.com/matthewboydphysio/



    Summary

    In this episode, Matthew Boyd discusses how to taper effectively for a race. Tapering involves reducing training volume and intensity in the lead up to a race to improve performance. The main benefits of tapering are allowing the body to fully recover from training and topping up glycogen stores.



    Boyd provides guidelines for tapering based on the duration of the race, recommending a two-week taper for marathons or longer and a one-week taper for shorter races. He also advises on adjusting strength training during the taper period to avoid soreness.



    Takeaways


    Tapering involves reducing training volume and intensity in the lead up to a race to improve performance.
    Tapering allows the body to fully recover from training and ensures glycogen stores are topped up.
    For marathons or longer races, a two-week taper is recommended, while shorter races require a one-week taper.
    Strength training during the taper period should be adjusted to avoid soreness.

    • 10 min
    Can You Run Marathons After a Stress Fracture? | Caitlin's Story

    Can You Run Marathons After a Stress Fracture? | Caitlin's Story

    If you’re an injured runner we can help you get back to running pain-free.



    Book a free call with us:

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/booking/



    Running Fundamentals Course:

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/running-fundamentals-course/



    Instagram:

    https://www.instagram.com/matthewboydphysio/



    Summary

    Caitlin Miller shares her journey of overcoming injury and returning to running. She started running casually in New York City and gradually became more serious, setting goals to run the world majors.



    However, she experienced a stress fracture in her hip, which was a setback in her training. She took the injury seriously, went through physical therapy, and gradually built her strength and mileage back up.



    She ran the London Marathon but didn't have the experience she had hoped for. She then set her sights on the Tokyo Marathon and had a much more enjoyable and successful race. Now, she is preparing for the Berlin Marathon and has learned to set time goals and trust her training.



    Takeaways


    Overcoming injury and returning to running requires patience, dedication, and proper rehabilitation.
    Setting time goals and trusting the training process can lead to successful and enjoyable races.
    Strength training and smart training methods are essential for injury prevention and improved performance.
    Having a positive mindset and embracing the journey can make the running experience more fulfilling.



    Chapters


    00:00 Introduction and Background
    09:00 Rehabilitation and Return to Running
    26:01 Looking Ahead to the Berlin Marathon
    33:09 Lessons Learned and Changing Relationship with Running

    • 40 min
    What Should I Do if It Hurts After I Run but Not During?

    What Should I Do if It Hurts After I Run but Not During?

    If you’re an injured runner we can help you get back to running pain-free.



    Click the link to book a free call with us

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/booking/



    Running Fundamentals Course

    https://matthewboydphysio.com/running-fundamentals-course/



    Instagram

    https://www.instagram.com/matthewboydphysio/



    Summary

    Latent pain, or pain that occurs after running, is a common issue for many runners. It is important to manage latent pain correctly in order to prevent further injury and promote healing.



    Latent pain can be caused by various factors, including physiological, mechanical, and psychological reasons. To manage latent pain, a traffic light system can be used.



    Green pain indicates mild pain that can be ignored and the run can continue as planned. Red pain indicates severe pain that requires stopping the run and modifying the training plan. Orange pain is moderate and requires caution and monitoring.



    It is important to record latent pain in the training log to track progress and adjust the training plan accordingly.



    Takeaways


    Latent pain is pain that occurs after running, either later in the day or the following morning.
    Managing latent pain correctly is important to prevent further injury and promote healing.
    A traffic light system can be used to manage latent pain, with green indicating mild pain that can be ignored, red indicating severe pain that requires stopping the run, and orange indicating moderate pain that requires caution.
    It is important to record latent pain in the training log to track progress and adjust the training plan accordingly.

    • 13 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

riafpc ,

Pain and Tendon episodes

Just listened to the episodes on these topics. Found them a great combination of practical explanations and references to research in a very accessible manner. Good sense of humor! Info is very useful to build appreciation of how amazing our bodies are! Looking forward to the rest of the series 😊

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