230 episodes

An hour of historical reporting told by the people who were there.

The History Hou‪r‬ BBC

    • History
    • 4.1 • 76 Ratings

An hour of historical reporting told by the people who were there.

    Black History: The Black Panthers

    Black History: The Black Panthers

    As part of our Black History coverage we look back at the Black Panthers and ask Professor Clayborne Carson of Stanford University "How radical was the US black rights group?" Also, we bring you an archive interview with Mary Wilson of the Supremes, we delve into the question of compensation after the abolition of slavery - and no, not compensation for the people who had been enslaved, but for the former slave owners. Also, how one descendent of slaves, James Dawkins, discovered his ancestors' connection with the British writer Richard Dawkins. And, looking back at the story of Henrietta Lacks the African-American whose cells revolutionised medical science.

    Photo: Schoolchildren at a Black Panthers breakfast club. Credit: Shutterstock

    • 50 min
    US 'smart bombs' hit an Iraqi air raid shelter

    US 'smart bombs' hit an Iraqi air raid shelter

    More than 400 civilians were killed when two US precision bombs hit the Amiriya air raid shelter in western Baghdad on the morning of 13 February 1991. The Americans claimed that the building had served as a command and control centre for Saddam Hussein's forces. It was the largest single case of civilian casualities that ocurred during Operation Desert Storm. Also in this week's programme, a drug scandal from the 1970s which blighted the lives of generations, rare archive of the celebrated British artist, Francis Bacon, the 1980s New York Street News newspaper set up to help the homeless and we hear from a nurse from West Africa who devoted her life to the British health service.

    Photo: Inside the Amiriya air-raid shelter following the US bombing (Kaveh Kazemi/Getty Images)

    • 50 min
    The Burma protests of 1988

    The Burma protests of 1988

    In August 1988, people took to the streets of Burma, or Myanmar, to protest against the country's military government. The bloody uprising would lead to the rise of Aung San Suu Kyi as the country's pro-democracy leader. Also, the epidemic of drug use among US troops in Vietnam in the 1970s, the first Eurostar train service and the launch of the spectacular Moscow State Circus in 1971

    PHOTO: Protestors in Rangoon in 1988 (Getty Images)

    • 50 min
    The Arab Spring of 2011

    The Arab Spring of 2011

    In the early months of 2011 a wave of social unrest swept across the Arab world as people protested against repressive and authoritarian regimes, economic stagnation, unemployment and corruption. It began with reaction to the self-immolation of a young market trader in Tunisia, but soon became an outpouring of resentment after generations of fear. On The History Hour, Professor Khaled Fahmy of Cambridge University, helps us unravel the roots of the uprisings, describes what it was like to be there, and looks at why things haven't turned out as the protesters had wanted.

    Photo: Libyan anti-Gaddafi protesters wave their old national flag as they stand atop an abandoned army tank in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi on February 28, 2011.(Credit PATRICK BAZ/AFP via Getty Images)

    • 50 min
    Hitler's beer hall putsch

    Hitler's beer hall putsch

    Hitler made his first attempt at seizing power in Germany in 1923, ten years before he eventually became Chancellor. The failed "beer hall putsch" - so named because it started in a beer hall in the southern city of Munich - would become a foundational part of the Nazis' self-mythology. Professor Frank McDonough tells us more.

    Plus, more Nazis with The Turner Diaries, the novel that inspired the US far right; anti-Sikh riots in India; the birth of Swahili-language publishing; and the house fire in New Cross, South London, which led to a Black People's Day of Action.

    PHOTO: Nazi members during the Beer Hall Putsch, Munich, Germany 1923 (Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

    • 49 min
    Attack at the US Capitol

    Attack at the US Capitol

    In 1954, Puerto Rican militants opened fire in the US House of Representatives, wounding five Congressmen - we hear how the assault was one of many previous attacks on American democracy. Plus, the coup attempt in Spain in 1981, India's first woman lawyer and landing a probe on Titan, one of Saturn's moons.

    PHOTO: Lolita Lebron and two other Puerto Rican activists are arrested in 1954 (Getty Images)

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
76 Ratings

76 Ratings

Dr.T. ,

Old enough to have lived through much of it but now I understand it so much better

Thank you for giving me such wonderful perspective on major events I've lived through but didn't really know what was going on.

Angusmecoatup ,

Wonderful recollections

A superb podcast that rediscovers so many events, like ships we had forgotten emerging from the fog of memory. The eye witness accounts make it compelling listening.

Jesse fogarty ,

Short Stories - Great Summaries

If you’re looking for a delve into any specific topic or story this isn’t for you. Each episode covers 2-3 stories - as such is great way to find interesting stories to do further research into.

Highly recommend

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