192 episodes

Weekly nuggets of developmentally appropriate parenting wisdom to help you parent your toddlers and preschoolers more effectively, with less effort. The Mudroom is recorded live on Facebook every Tuesday at 9pm eastern, 6pm pacific.

the Mudroom Allana Robinson

    • Kids & Family
    • 4.9 • 14 Ratings

Weekly nuggets of developmentally appropriate parenting wisdom to help you parent your toddlers and preschoolers more effectively, with less effort. The Mudroom is recorded live on Facebook every Tuesday at 9pm eastern, 6pm pacific.

    Is it Ok to Cry in Front Of Your Child?

    Is it Ok to Cry in Front Of Your Child?

    When it comes to our children, parents are assigned the role of protector, a pillar of strength, always knowing the answer and in complete control of the situation.

    So, when something becomes overwhelming, or we get frustrated, sad, even angry, there’s almost this panic to hide those emotions from our children.

    It's a borderline taboo and for a lot of parents it feels wrong.

    I don’t think parents outright hear someone tell them “don’t let your kids see you cry” but the idea that showing “negative” emotion in front of our kids is a bad thing is subtly suggested.

    How many movies have you seen where the mom smiles as she waves her kid off to school, double checks to make sure no one else is around, and then falls apart behind the closed door?

    Or silently crying in the drivers seat and insisting everything is okay to shield the children from their sadness as if it’s this dangerous thing?

    And if we’re brave enough to dig a little deeper here, maybe you’ve learned it from you parents or other adults in your life when you were younger. There are so many adults who can’t recall seeing adults be vulnerable when they were children.

    Besides anger (or happiness), there aren’t many millennials who remember seeing their parents openly share other emotions, much less witness how they navigated or resolved that moment.

    The fear is > crying or showing strong emotion in front of your kids is going to harm them in some way.

    So the message current parents learned from that > don’t cry in front of your kids.

    I want to explore that a little bit.

    In this week’s mudroom we’re going to have a heart-to-heart about crying in front of your kids.


    We’ll dig a little bit deeper into how our own experience as children may have shaped our view about expressing emotions now that we’re parents.
    How showing feelings in front of your child can actually help them with their own emotions.
    And the important part of this process that kids need to see- because yes it’s okay to express emotions, but we also don’t want to constantly be losing our $hit in front of them either. There’s a caveat (and I’ll admit, it’s not something that comes natural for a lot of us).



    Grab the Scripts to Manage the Top 10 Crazy-Making Behaviours: prnt.link/scripts Watch the video recording here: Join the Parenting Posse: prnt.link/group the Mudroom is recorded live every Wednesday at 1:30pm ET/ 12:30pm CT/ 10:30am PT on Facebook: facebook.com/arfamilyservices


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    • 10 min
    Why is My Child Biting?

    Why is My Child Biting?

    There is nothing quite as triggering to parents as their child biting.

    I mean…who the heck opens their mouth and decides to latch onto another human's skin?!

    It’s wild when you think about it like that.

    But the answer is young children. Young children do that.

    Whether it’s at home and your kid is just randomly chomping into your arm while you play.

    Your toddler sinking their teeth into their baby brother when upset.

    Or maybe you get that dreaded “ouchie note” home and a little frown from their daycare teacher letting you know your kid has been leaving teeth imprints on friends.

    Biting is actually a pretty common “misbehavior”.

    It’s not a pleasant time.

    But it’s also not necessarily a thing to panic over either.

    Don’t get me wrong, we’re going to take it seriously, especially if they’re breaking skin, but we’re not gonna lose our minds over it.

    And I’m going to tell you why.

    In this episode I’m going to explain the 3 main reasons why children bite.

    So whether you think they’re biting out of anger, just randomly drive-by biting, or seeming to get a kick out of seeing the person's reaction, those reasons all still tie back to the big 3.

    Once you learn what those 3 reasons are, it’s going to be much easier to stop the biting- and I’ll bet it’ll relieve some stress you might have about it too.

    So, ready to find out why children get the urge to gnaw on someone?



    Grab the Scripts to Manage the Top 10 Crazy-Making Behaviours: prnt.link/scripts Watch the video recording here: Join the Parenting Posse: prnt.link/group the Mudroom is recorded live every Wednesday at 1:30pm ET/ 12:30pm CT/ 10:30am PT on Facebook: facebook.com/arfamilyservices


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    • 11 min
    Thinking of Holding Your Kid Back a Grade?

    Thinking of Holding Your Kid Back a Grade?

    “Redshirting” or delaying enrolling your child into Kinder (or 1st grade if you chose to skip Kinder) and keeping your child back a year is a question I get asked about frequently.

    There’s a lot of anxiety and stress about the decision to redshirt or not red shirt, and to be honest there’s a whole bunch of controversy and drama about it too.

    So I figured I’d go ahead and chat about it in this week’s Mudroom.

    I get asked a lot about it because I made the decision to red-shirt my oldest son, which I’ve openly talked about before. He’s currently getting ready to step into the exciting world of being a 3rd grader but would have been going into 4th grade.

    And I didn’t make that decision lightly.

    There’s a whole bunch of reasons why you might choose to hold your child back a grade and a whole bunch of reasons why you might decide against it.

    In this episode I’m not going to try and convince you to do one or the other.

    But I will share my experience and reasons for red-shirting my oldest and some things you might want to consider when making a decision of your own.

    BTW- If you are thinking this over, know that there are tons of factors that come into play with this decision, including what you’re legally allowed to do.

    I’m not throwing out any legal advice whatsoever (so, please for the love of everything good don’t take it as legal advice) but I will also share the general steps I took to make sure I didn’t land myself in any trouble.

    Cause I know finding the information can be a little overwhelming.



    Grab the Scripts to Manage the Top 10 Crazy-Making Behaviours: prnt.link/scripts Watch the video recording here: Join the Parenting Posse: prnt.link/group the Mudroom is recorded live every Wednesday at 1:30pm ET/ 12:30pm CT/ 10:30am PT on Facebook: facebook.com/arfamilyservices


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    • 15 min
    How to Validate Your Child's Emotions

    How to Validate Your Child's Emotions

    “Validate their emotions” is a phrase that has taken on almost a comedic meaning.

    Along with the general misunderstanding that gentle parenting means let-your-kids-run-wild and baby talk your 5 year old,

    Validating emotions has also been misunderstood as absurdly pointing out your kid is crying (in a baby voice of course) and then awkwardly standing there staring at one another for a while.

    And I’ll admit, I’ve had my fair share of laughs watching the Instagram reels where parents share their frustration about it.

    It feels silly to have your toddler stomping around the kitchen and borderline bear growling at you and then saying “aaawww…you must be sooooo angry!”

    Well duh.

    What gave it away, the stomping or the bear growls? 🤪

    But the reason is can feel so absurd is because there’s:

    A: confusion about the purpose of validating emotions in children (and it’s not to coddle them).

    And B: confusion about how to validate emotions.

    So that’s what this week’s Mudroom conversation will be about.

    We’ll chat about why we validate our children’s emotions, how this helps their behavior in the long run, and 3 easy steps to validating their emotions in an impactful way.

    As always, I want to stress that this is not about letting children get away with everything and do whatever they want.

    It’s about helping them feel secure while they figure out this whole human experience.



    Grab the Scripts to Manage the Top 10 Crazy-Making Behaviours: prnt.link/scripts Watch the video recording here: Join the Parenting Posse: prnt.link/group the Mudroom is recorded live every Wednesday at 1:30pm ET/ 12:30pm CT/ 10:30am PT on Facebook: facebook.com/arfamilyservices


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    • 15 min
    Can I Interrupt Your Real Quick?

    Can I Interrupt Your Real Quick?

    I don’t know about you but for myself and alot of people I know, we were raised being told that interrupting was rude.

    So it’s understandable that we as parents get frustrated every time their child bursts into the middle of their conversation to ask why puppies and cats don’t get along while waving a coloring sheet of a puppy and cat snuggling in your face.

    It’s a bit rude (and a bit annoying).

    And kids do it alot.

    You might have attempted to correct this by telling them “stop interrupting” and unsurprisingly that doesn’t work.

    Not to mention they take your break in conversation to tell them to “stop interrupting” as a green light to continue interrupting and squeeze in whatever it is they wanted to tell you.

    I mean, might as well while they’ve got your attention anyway.

    The good news is children don’t do this to be rude on purpose, or to be disrespectful.

    There are certain skills that they need to build and strengthen to recognize that they’re interrupting and then further keep themselves from doing so.

    This can be especially difficult for some children, especially if it’s something they’re super excited about.

    That’s why in this week’s Mudroom I’m going to go over:


    Why children interrupt
    The solution to help your kids stop interrupting
    And the key to making sure they’re able to resist interrupting (especially when they’re eager to share with you or someone else.)

    Grab the Scripts to Manage the Top 10 Crazy-Making Behaviours: prnt.link/scripts Watch the video recording here: Join the Parenting Posse: prnt.link/group the Mudroom is recorded live every Wednesday at 1:30pm ET/ 12:30pm CT/ 10:30am PT on Facebook: facebook.com/arfamilyservices


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    • 7 min
    Trauma Bonding

    Trauma Bonding

    Buckle up because we’re going to talk about a serious topic for this week’s Mudroom.

    Recently there’s been a big surge in discussion around things like spanking and physical punishment out of love for their children.

    “Spare the rod- spoil the child” kind of energy.

    I do want to make this perfectly clear: we don’t spank children around here.

    You won’t ever hear me say: spank your child, a small pop is okay, a little tap is fine.

    There is no justification for physically harming your child.

    There is no place for it in discipline (or anywhere).

    Cool? Cool.

    That said- since it’s a topic of discussion that’s popped up recently in the free parenting group 

    And it’s seemed to have stirred up some interest in trauma bonds. I’ve talked about it before but given the response from the community it seems like it’s worth discussing again.

    So in this week’s Mudroom conversation I’m going to explain what trauma bonds are, what that looks like in a parent/child relationship, and how it impacts children.

    I do want to say, I know this can ruffle some feathers. The term itself trauma bond is really heavy and intense, but it’s our job as parents to be brave enough to face the hard stuff.

    To come to terms with the difficult parts of raising a child and learning so we can do better.

    So this is my invite for you to be brave, and join this conversation to and see what you learn.



    Grab the Scripts to Manage the Top 10 Crazy-Making Behaviours: prnt.link/scripts Watch the video recording here: Join the Parenting Posse: prnt.link/group the Mudroom is recorded live every Wednesday at 1:30pm ET/ 12:30pm CT/ 10:30am PT on Facebook: facebook.com/arfamilyservices


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    • 9 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
14 Ratings

14 Ratings

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