12 episodes

Trust in journalists is at an all-time low, but the work of journalism matters more than ever. And traditional “objectivity” may be hurting, rather than helping. All journalists have a view from somewhere, and ”objective” journalism often upholds status quo thinking and reinforces racism, sexism, and transphobia. Host Lewis Raven Wallace was fired from the public radio show Marketplace in 2017 for saying just that. In the years since, Lewis has dug into the history of “objectivity,” who it serves, and who it excludes. The View from Somewhere tells the stories of journalists who have resisted “objectivity” and stood up for justice, and envisions new approaches to truth and integrity in journalism.

The View from Somewhere Critical Frequency

    • History

Trust in journalists is at an all-time low, but the work of journalism matters more than ever. And traditional “objectivity” may be hurting, rather than helping. All journalists have a view from somewhere, and ”objective” journalism often upholds status quo thinking and reinforces racism, sexism, and transphobia. Host Lewis Raven Wallace was fired from the public radio show Marketplace in 2017 for saying just that. In the years since, Lewis has dug into the history of “objectivity,” who it serves, and who it excludes. The View from Somewhere tells the stories of journalists who have resisted “objectivity” and stood up for justice, and envisions new approaches to truth and integrity in journalism.

    Public Media and the Limits of Diversity

    Public Media and the Limits of Diversity

    Former public radio reporter Brenda Salinas and former public television producer Cecilia Garcia reflect on how far public media hasn’t come on “diversity” in the last forty years—and why. Also: how producers of color can protect their magic. Lewis and Ramona share their experiences in public media, and suggest a different framework for thinking about “diversity.” Salinas, an NPR Kroc Fellow and a producer at KUT Austin, describes how she was pushed out of public media by racism and sexism; Garcia, creator of the bilingual Latino newsmagazine Para mi Pueblo, sat on a task force in 1977 calling for the kind of diversity public media still struggles with. 

    • 37 min
    Straight News? AIDS and Queer Media History

    Straight News? AIDS and Queer Media History

    Queer media has always been based in a personal experience, and being close to the story role served a particular purpose in a time of crisis. Sarah Schulman, Steven Thrasher, and John Scagliotti reflect on the history of queer media, from Scagliotti’s scrappy start in the 1970s, to Schulman’s groundbreaking reporting in the 1980s, to the work of the LGBTQ press to expose the truth about the AIDS crisis. 

    • 34 min
    The Second Annual View from Somewhere Kick-a-thon, Featuring “Dreamgirl” Ramona Martinez on Piano

    The Second Annual View from Somewhere Kick-a-thon, Featuring “Dreamgirl” Ramona Martinez on Piano

    Producer Ramona Martinez takes over as host for a “live” pledge drive in support of The View from Somewhere’s Kickstarter campaign—we’re close to our goal! She plays piano and takes a call from her cat Cyclops, who’s somehow figured out how to use a phone. Plus: The Twin Peaks theme song, and real live shedding of tears. This episode was inspired by the “Dan Roddlestein’s Holiday Hoopla” episode from the Dreamboy podcast. 

    • 12 min
    Special Episode: Resisting “Fake News” By Exercising Truth Muscles

    Special Episode: Resisting “Fake News” By Exercising Truth Muscles

    While on tour this past fall, host Lewis Raven Wallace heard a lot of questions—about how to change people’s minds, how to challenge “fake news” and disinformation, and how to change journalism collectively. In response, he reads from the conclusion of The View from Somewhere book, “The End of Journalism,” and fills us in on the crowdfunding campaign that’s now underway!

    • 13 min
    The Life and Death of Ruben Salazar

    The Life and Death of Ruben Salazar

    He was one of the first Latinos to write for an anglo newspaper, covering the increasingly-active Chicano movement in Los Angeles. Professional distance from the story was important to him, but after cops killed him at a protest, he was transformed from an observer to a movement hero. Ramona Martinez shares a piece she produced for BackStory about this overlooked Latino legend. 

    • 16 min
    Truth and Vietnam

    Truth and Vietnam

    The heyday of “objective” journalism was short-lived—Civil Rights, the women’s movement, and the war in Vietnam all chipped away at it. Lewis Raven Wallace meets two rabble-rousing women reporters who engaged with Vietnam in very different ways, Laura Palmer and Kerry Gruson. Both walked away with the conclusion that serving the truth is full of gray areas.

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

BeachesAlex ,

Brilliant

An excellent and thoughtful podcast that addresses some of the most urgent and compelling questions of our time.

Top Podcasts In History

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by Critical Frequency