66 episodes

Voice-first technology is becoming the operating system of healthcare, and it is poised to completely disrupt the way we experience everything in health and medicine. We are entering the era of ambient computing – smart speakers around us that are ready to carry out our commands through the most natural interfaces known to us – our voices. In this podcast, we discuss the latest news, projects, research, and breakthroughs about the rapidly expanding intersection of Healthcare and VoiceFirst technologies. We cover Amazon Echo and Alexa devices, Google Assistant, Samsung Bixby, Microsoft Cortana, Apple Siri, and other smart speakers, in addition to voice recognition, natural language understanding, artificial intelligence (AI), and everything that works (and doesn’t work) to help you better understand where our healthcare system is headed.
Dr Teri Fisher is a Sport & Exercise Physician and Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. He is an experienced keynote speaker, educator, consultant, and podcaster, who loves sharing his excitement and passion for artificial intelligence and voice-first technology. He has a passion for e-health innovation and the intersection of voice technology and healthcare.

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Voice First Health Teri Fisher, MD

    • Technology
    • 5.0, 2 Ratings

Voice-first technology is becoming the operating system of healthcare, and it is poised to completely disrupt the way we experience everything in health and medicine. We are entering the era of ambient computing – smart speakers around us that are ready to carry out our commands through the most natural interfaces known to us – our voices. In this podcast, we discuss the latest news, projects, research, and breakthroughs about the rapidly expanding intersection of Healthcare and VoiceFirst technologies. We cover Amazon Echo and Alexa devices, Google Assistant, Samsung Bixby, Microsoft Cortana, Apple Siri, and other smart speakers, in addition to voice recognition, natural language understanding, artificial intelligence (AI), and everything that works (and doesn’t work) to help you better understand where our healthcare system is headed.
Dr Teri Fisher is a Sport & Exercise Physician and Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. He is an experienced keynote speaker, educator, consultant, and podcaster, who loves sharing his excitement and passion for artificial intelligence and voice-first technology. He has a passion for e-health innovation and the intersection of voice technology and healthcare.

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    Voice User Interface Design for Healthcare with Ilana Meir

    Voice User Interface Design for Healthcare with Ilana Meir

    VUI for Health
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    • 25 min
    Alexa Healthcare Skills with Dr. Bob Kolock

    Alexa Healthcare Skills with Dr. Bob Kolock

    In this episode, Teri welcomes Dr. Bob Kolock, a retired physician, executive, and active Amazon Alexa skills developer.
    Dr. Bob Kolock has over 35 years of experience in healthcare delivery. Since retirement, he has had the opportunity to spend more time on things that really interest him. That led him to begin learning JavaScript and the Amazon Alexa development process. To date, he has 5 Alexa Skills certified by Amazon. He is currently working on 2 more and one of the two is very much aligned with his healthcare career. It’s focused on improving the transition of care of patients who have undergone a medical procedure. He will be looking for partners to make this Alexa Skill a routine way to deliver post-procedure care instructions in health care delivery systems.
    Key Points from Dr. Kolock!
    Becoming an extremely prolific Alexa skills developer after retirement from the healthcare space.The healthcare oriented suite of skills that he’s developing.Getting in Voice Technology
    He retired 6 years ago and he had had an idea to build a smartphone tool to help manage foods in the pantry or refrigerator so someone could identify them before they got spoiled. He therefore started learning iOS, Android, JavaScript, and how to create an Alexa skill.His first skill was Food Manager and he initially thought that a bar code scan would give the necessary information in as far as expiration dates were concerned, but they didn’t, so he had to find another way to import the information.His Skills So Far
    He has created a variety of 18 Alexa skills, 3 of which are revised, and a number of them have to do with healthcare and behavior change. They also relate to the website that he built to function with his database.One of his most popular skills is called Our Little Secret, and the concept behind it is that a brother or sister gives the user secrets based on what they hear around the user’s house. This plays on the privacy concern but the secrets are fictitious and are meant to be funny.Another one is Wine Jester where the idea is to hold a glass of wine to the smart speaker and it will say what the taste, fragrance, and components of the wine are.Healthcare Skills
    One of his first healthcare skills was Blood Pressure Check, and it’s based on the American Heart Association guidelines. The user tells the skill what their blood pressure reading is and the skill gives them feedback as to where that blood pressure might fall.Another one is My Weigh Loss Coach that helps users track their weight loss goals, and gives them positive or negative feedback based on their results.On his website, one can set up text messages to themselves to help with behavior change, and hence he has a skill called Healthy Text Scheduler that sends users scheduled healthy eating texts.The other one is Track My Dose, which helps people manage the medication they’re supposed to take on an as-needed basis.He also has Kindness Counts, a skill that was inspired by all the negativity that’s been in the world. It helps people focus on the good things that are happening around us.He also has two other skills that are geared towards helping physicians become more efficient so they can deliver care to more patients, and also help patients with their follow up care after a medical procedure.Links and Resources in this Episode
    The Comprehensive Flash Briefing Formula CourseVoice Technology in Healthcare Bookwww.TheVoiceDen.comDr. Kolock’s email - rakolock1@gmail.comFood ManagerOur Little SecretWine JesterBlood Pressure CheckMy Weigh Loss CoachHealthy Text SchedulerTrack My DoseKindness Counts
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    • 22 min
    Conversational AI with Israel Krush of Hyro.ai

    Conversational AI with Israel Krush of Hyro.ai

    In this episode, Teri welcomes Israel Krush, the CEO and Co-Founder at Hyro, a voice platform that allows enterprises to easily add voice capabilities to their websites and mobile apps.
    Israel is based in Israel, and is a former elite intelligence officer in the Israeli Defense Forces. He studied Computer Science and Statistics, has a background in machine learning. He previously worked as a software engineer for Intel and various startup companies. His company Hyro allows customers to have two-way conversations to simplify their access to relevant information. Starting with healthcare, the software enables organizations to better engage with their existing customers and reduce the cost of customer support.
    Key Points from Israel!
    What they’re doing in the voice technology and conversational AI space taking data from various places and serving it up via their AI technology for people to incorporate into their websites, businesses, and other entities.The interesting work they’re doing to help with the COVID-19 pandemic.What Hyro Does
    It’s a plug and play conversational AI platform for healthcare providers.The company is focused on both voice and text as long as it’s natural language.They target enterprises and organizations that have massive amounts of data that is hard to navigate.The most important aspect of their solution is the plug and play.While researching the voice assistant and chatbot market, they learned that a lot of the existing solutions are based on a creation platform.Hyro gives their users a creation platform where they can define their intents and build their workflows or conversational flows. They discovered that there was a lot of friction in the deployment and maintenance of their platform for users, so they decided to look for a plug and play approach.  One of the main valuable use cases of their solution for healthcare providers has been helping patients find a physician when they need one. They find a physician based on various attributes of the physician.Another use case is in helping patients find the services that a healthcare provider offers.The patients and other users can interact through various modes and devices. Most traffic comes from mobile devices through typing (texting).Helping Battle COVID-19
    When the pandemic started, they gathered in conference rooms in all their locations to discuss how they could help with the situation because they knew that patients would have multiple questions regarding the Coronavirus.Based on their technology, they scrapped the certified resources that have answers for questions around COVID-19. They specifically scrapped the WHO and CDC websites, and then constructed a knowledge graph about the virus and released a free chatbot that is also addressing issues around the virus. The chatbot answers frequently asked questions about the virus and gives people a risk assessment based on a short dialogue with a user about their age, where they’re based, whether they’ve interacted with a COVID-19 patient, and other things.Feedback From Users
    Hyro doesn’t offer a one-fits-all solution. Every healthcare provider has their own unique needs, data sources, and how they handle their patients.With the COVID-19 solution, some healthcare providers have provided additional resources about the virus like their own FAQ webpages.Healthcare providers saw a need for a conversational solution to help patients in getting relevant information. They therefore felt Hyro’s solutions made sense.The Rise of Telemedicine
    People are adopting telemedicine more and more because it has become clear that the old way of healthcare is gone and patients are more willing to use telemedicine.They see the same adoption in the conversational aspect of their solution. Patients are constantly asking how they can schedule a virtual appointment.Links and Resources in this Episode
    The Compre

    • 25 min
    Voice and Wearables with Dave Kemp of Future Ear

    Voice and Wearables with Dave Kemp of Future Ear

    In this episode, Teri welcomes Dave Kemp, a thought leader in the intersection between voice first technology and hearables.
    Dave is part of a company called Oak Tree Products and they provide medical supplies and devices to the hearing technology industry. He also has a blog called FuturEar.co where he documents the rapid technological breakthroughs that are occurring in the hearables niche, including biometric sensors and voice assistants that are being incorporated into the hearable devices.
    Key Points from Dave!
    How he became an expert in hearables and voice technology.The content that he wrote in a chapter of the book, Voice Technology in Healthcare.Concrete examples of case scenarios where voice technology can be used to make a difference in people’s lives.Voice Technology and Hearables: The Origin Story
    The first time he was introduced to voice technology was at one of the first Alexa Conference events. He had gone there because he was researching what would happen with hearables due to that fact that hearing aids were becoming Bluetooth enabled.In 2015/2016, all the hearing aids that were coming to market were Bluetooth enabled and so he started thinking about the app economy and what else could be done technology wise in the hearing aid arena.The person who got him interested in voice technology was Brian Roemmelle when he came across his content on Twitter and read it.Brian talked about voice technology as something that would simplify everything back to the basics such that a four-year-old could communicate with the technology just as a 95-year-old could. That’s what gave Dave the aha moment, and he started to see the potential of smart speakers.He realized that if smart speakers continued to proliferate and people continued to increasingly depend on them for more and more things, then people would probably want that type of functionality on their person. He saw the Bluetooth enabled hearing aids as a potential tech to fulfill that.Voice Technology in Healthcare Book
    Dave wrote a chapter in the book about hearables and how they're becoming enabled. He started by talking about the technical side of it and progressively wrote about how they would impact the end users.There’s been the development of consumer grade devices that have the type of technology that legitimizes them as medical grade wearables and hearables. An example is the Apple Watch. The Apple Watch series 4 even has an ECG monitor.There will be a number of applications and environments where that technology will be applied but Dave is more focused on how the everyday person could build a longitudinal health data set (this refers to how someone can collect data about their health a few times a year through a wearable)He talked a lot about how the devices work through PPG sensors, which are the optical based sensors that are increasingly being placed into different wearable devices, for example, on the underside of an Apple watch.The sensors don’t really capture new things and the machine learning algorithms that are layered on top of them are the ones that create new insights by detecting patterns. Dave talked all about that in the chapter from a data collection standpoint.He also wrote about how voice technology could be layered on top of that. He dived into how that would be impactful to end users, caregivers, and all different types of stakeholders.Links and Resources in this Episode
    The Comprehensive Flash Briefing Formula CourseVoice Technology in Healthcare Bookwww.FutureEar.coFuture Ear Radio Podcast
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    • 23 min
    Healthcare in a Post-Pandemic World with Brian Roemmele

    Healthcare in a Post-Pandemic World with Brian Roemmele

    In this episode, Teri shares a recording of his recent webinar where Brian Roemmele spoke about some of his ideas and visions for what our world is going to look like using voice technology after the current Coronavirus pandemic.
    Brian is the man that actually came up with the term “Voice First” and he’s often referred to as the Oracle of Voice and the Modern Day Thomas Edison. He is a scientist, researcher, analyst, connector, thinker, and doer. Over the long winding arc of his career, Brian has built and run payments and tech businesses, worked in media, including the promotion of top musicians, and explored a variety of other subjects along the way.
    He actively shares his findings and observations across fora like Forbes, Huffington Post, Newsweek, Slate, Business Insider, Daily Mail, Inc, Gizmodo, Medium, Quora (An exclusive Quora top writer for: 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, and 2013), Twitter (quoted and published), Around the Coin (earliest cryptocurrency podcast), Breaking Banks Radio and This Week In Voice on VoiceFirst.FM that surfaces everything from Bitcoin to Voice Commerce.
    Key Points from Brian!
    Where he sees voice making the biggest impact in times like these with the Coronavirus pandemic.How voice technology will change healthcare and life in general as we know it for the better.Brian’s Predictions On The Future Impact Of Voice
    We are going to see a redesign of public interaction surfaces (like over the air hand gestures) and more things interacting with voice.Our devices will also become an interface actuated by voice or touch to open doors, choose locations and elevators, open car doors, and a number of similar things, because people will be galvanized with the thought that there could be some dangerous virus years after the Coronavirus.He recently studied a lot of information about the 1918 pandemic and he was able to dive into the mindset of what happened after the pandemic to determine what changed in society. He was able to come up with some of the similarities between that pandemic and the current pandemic, and determine just how society today will change after the Coronavirus pandemic is over.One of the discoveries that were made after the 1918 pandemic was that copper surfaces had an immediate response in devitalizing or deactivating viruses.Certain minerals and metals also devitalize viruses and bacteria through something called Contact Kill which has been widely known for hundreds of years. People in Sumerian times were actually using silver and copper utensils, which some people saw as a sign of wealth, when in reality the utensils actually killed viruses and bacteria, and made their food more presentable.Brian feels that hospital surfaces and beds should have a copper alloy coding to safeguard against viruses and other pathogens.He thinks that there will need to be a way to diagnose people through voice, and how he sees that happening is through different bio-sensors that will be put on a person when they walk into a hospital and start diagnosing them before a medical attendant gets to see them.He insists that that those biosensor devices must not be on the internet in any way so that they’re never compromised. Those devices will be tuned to a user’s personality, outlook, goals, motivations, and they will notice changes in someone’s sleep patterns, and other things that serve as an early warning system.Brian has looked at several studies on Coronaviruses and realized that there are several early warning systems like sleep pattern disturbances, digestive pattern disturbances, change in temperature, change in heart rate variability, change in blink rate, and other things.There are a number of signs of any virus within a human body, and one of those things is a change in someone’s temperature gradient. If one has a voice first device on them, it can be notified of their change in te

    • 1 hr 6 min
    COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Pandemic Update

    COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Pandemic Update

    Can Voice First Technology Help with Pandemics?
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    • 5 min

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