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A podcast where Imogen Foulkes puts big questions facing the world to the experts working to tackle them in Switzerland’s international city. Produced as part of the Genève Vision media network, in partnership with the Graduate Institute Geneva.

Inside Geneva SWI swissinfo.ch

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    • 4.9 • 12 Bewertungen

A podcast where Imogen Foulkes puts big questions facing the world to the experts working to tackle them in Switzerland’s international city. Produced as part of the Genève Vision media network, in partnership with the Graduate Institute Geneva.

    What is the ITU and why does it matter?

    What is the ITU and why does it matter?

    In this episode, host Imogen Foulkes explores the most important UN agency most of us have never heard of.
      
    Malcolm Johnson, deputy secretary general, ITU: ‘Telephony, radio and tv broadcasting , satellite communications, the internet, they wouldn’t have developed.’
      
    So what has the International Telecommunications Union ever done for us?
      
    Fiona Alexander, IT expert: ‘If you’re a beneficiary of any modern day communications network, you have benefitted from something that the ITU has done.’
      
    And why are Russia and the United States competing to lead it?
      
    Simon Manley, UK ambassador to the UN in Geneva: ‘We want to see an internet that is open, that is peaceful, that is secure, that enables the sharing of knowledge, the sharing of ideas.’
      
    Can different countries really unite around best standards for the internet? And can they work together to bridge the digital divide?
      
    Fiona Alexander, IT expert: ‘Every member state has a different perspective on what’s appropriate and what’s not appropriate online.’

    • 27 Min.
    Day of the Disappeared

    Day of the Disappeared

    For more than 150 years the ICRC has been re-uniting those separated by war and natural disaster. Inside Geneva visits the Central Tracing Agency.
      
    Florence Anselmo, Head of the Central Tracing Agency: "People going missing, families getting separated, families not knowing what has happened to their loved ones."
      
     Now it’s busy letting Russian and Ukrainian families know what has happened to their sons.
      
     Anastasia Kushleyko, CTA: "I’m calling from the ICRC, I’m calling from Geneva and this is the Central Tracing Agency. As of last week he was safe and well. He’s healthy."
      
     The tracing agency keeps its records forever.
      
    Jelena Milosevic Lepotic: "A grandchild of someone who was in the second world war, you would be able to find information on your grandfather: when he was captured, where he was held, and what happened to him."
      
     Because families will always need to know.
      
    Florence Anselmo: "Families do not stop searching. The need to know crosses generations. If parents do not have answers their children will look for answers and their grandchildren will look for answers."

    • 30 Min.
    Syria: the forgotten crisis

    Syria: the forgotten crisis

    While the spotlight is on Ukraine, the UN says humanitarian needs in Syria are greater than ever. 
    Podcast host Imogen Foulkes is joined in this episode by humanitarian experts.
    “The World Food Programme had to reduce by 13% their food rations because of funding,” says Sanjana Quazi, head of office at the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) in Turkey.
    The UN budget for Syria is underfunded and further devalued by rising food and fuel prices.
    “What we’re seeing is a trend towards negative coping mechanisms. Early marriage, child labour, and what’s really alarming is increased attempted suicide rates,” says Tanya Evans, country director at the International Rescue Committee (IRC) in Syria.
    Has the world forgotten about Syria?
    “If I read the English newspapers, it’s all about Ukraine. How can we put what’s happening in Syria back on the radar?” asks analyst Daniel Warner.

    • 34 Min.
    Women, peace, and security

    Women, peace, and security

    From war to food insecurity and climate change; would the world be a better, safer place if women took more decisions?
    Inside Geneva podcast host Imogen Foulkes is joined in this episode by women peace and security experts.
    “Participation of women in peace and security, obviously must go beyond an ‘add-women-and-stir’ approach,” says Julia Hofstetter, president of Women in International Security, Switzerland.
    How well are women represented in security discussions?
    “Thirty per cent of the delegates negotiating arms control and disarmament are women, so 70% are men,” says Renata H. Dalaqua, head of the Gender and Disarmament Programme of the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research.
    Is increasing numbers enough?
    “The world needs not only participation of women but also the feminist analysis on peace,” says Maria Butler, executive director of the Nobel Women’s Initiative.
    In this episode of our Inside Geneva podcast: Geneva-based humanitarian aid agencies are soul searching as they stand accused of institutional racism. What's behind the accusations, and how are they being addressed?

    • 34 Min.
    What do rights groups want from the UN?

    What do rights groups want from the UN?

    By the end of this month, the UN will have a new human rights chief. It’s sometimes called the UN’s toughest job. Inside Geneva host Imogen Foulkes talks exclusively to the leaders of the world’s top human rights groups, and asks them how they see the job.
     
     Ken Roth, Executive Director, Human Rights Watch: "The High Commissioner has no aid budget, they have no army, they have no way to influence anybody, other than through their public reporting and their public voice."
     
     What’s the legacy of outgoing commissioner Michelle Bachelet?
     
     Agnes Callamard, Secretary General, Amnesty International: "She stood up to the United States on the issue of systemic racism, as she should have."
     
     What about the controversial trip to China?
     
    Ken Roth: "If you look at for example Madam Bachelet’s utter failure during her recent trip to Beijing, the blame really beings with Guterres."
     
    What are the challenges for the new commissioner?
     
     Agnes Callamard: "If you cannot stand up to China, you may as well stop doing human rights work."
    In this episode of our Inside Geneva podcast: Geneva-based humanitarian aid agencies are soul searching as they stand accused of institutional racism. What's behind the accusations, and how are they being addressed?

    • 30 Min.
    What does it take to lead the UN human rights office?

    What does it take to lead the UN human rights office?

    UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet will leave office at the end of August. The hunt is on for the world’s new human rights leader.


    Podcast host Imogen Foulkes asks former United Nations human rights chief Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein what it is like to do the job.


    “Most of my time I was writing to governments, talking to them, calling them, but I had no hesitation of going public when I felt we needed to go public,” says Zeid.

     
     Does he have any advice for a new commissioner?


    “Navi Pillay (former high commissioner) said the worst mistake you can make is to privilege any country. Don’t privilege any particular group or country,” he recalls.

     
     And how risky is calling countries to account?

     
     “Rather than you worry about how they may react to your statements, they ought to be worrying about what you might be saying about them,” answers Zeid.
    In this episode of our Inside Geneva podcast: Geneva-based humanitarian aid agencies are soul searching as they stand accused of institutional racism. What's behind the accusations, and how are they being addressed?

    • 24 Min.

Kundenrezensionen

4.9 von 5
12 Bewertungen

12 Bewertungen

secure_pas ,

Excellent podcast on international Geneva

Fantastic production for more background on international Geneva.

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