300 episodios

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ideas, people and events that have shaped our world.

In Our Time BBC Podcasts

    • Historia
    • 4.7 • 6 calificaciones

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ideas, people and events that have shaped our world.

    The Great Stink

    The Great Stink

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the stench from the River Thames in the hot summer of 1858 and how it appalled and terrified Londoners living and working beside it, including those in the new Houses of Parliament which were still under construction. There had been an outbreak of cholera a few years before in which tens of thousands had died, and a popular theory held that foul smells were linked to diseases. The source of the problem was that London's sewage, once carted off to fertilise fields had recently, thanks to the modern flushing systems, started to flow into the river and, thanks to the ebb and flow of the tides, was staying there and warming in the summer sun. The engineer Joseph Bazalgette was given the task to build huge new sewers to intercept the waste, a vast network, so changing the look of London and helping ensure there were no further cholera outbreaks from contaminated water.

    The image above is from Punch, July 10th 1858 and it has this caption: The 'Silent Highway'-Man. "Your Money or your Life!"

    With

    Rosemary Ashton
    Emeritus Quain Professor of English Language and Literature at University College London

    Stephen Halliday
    Author of ‘The Great Stink of London: Sir Joseph Bazalgette and the Cleansing of the Victorian Metropolis’

    And

    Paul Dobraszczyk
    Lecturer at the Bartlett School of Architecture at University College London

    • 50 min
    Persuasion

    Persuasion

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Jane Austen’s last complete novel, which was published just before Christmas in 1817, five months after her death. It is the story of Anne Elliot, now 27 and (so we are told), losing her bloom, and of her feelings for Captain Wentworth who she was engaged to, 8 years before – an engagement she broke off under pressure from her father and godmother. When Wentworth, by chance, comes back into Anne Elliot's life, he is still angry with her and neither she nor Austen's readers can know whether it is now too late for their thwarted love to have a second chance.

    The image above is from a 1995 BBC adaptation of the novel, with Amanda Root and Ciarán Hinds

    With

    Karen O’Brien
    Vice-Chancellor of Durham University

    Fiona Stafford
    Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Oxford

    And

    Paddy Bullard
    Associate Professor of English Literature and Book History at the University of Reading

    Producer: Simon Tillotson

    • 50 min
    Citizen Kane

    Citizen Kane

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Orson Welles' film, released in 1941, which is widely acclaimed as one of the greatest, if not the greatest, films yet made. Welles plays the lead role of Charles Foster Kane, a newspaper magnate, and Welles directed, produced and co-wrote this story of loneliness at the heart of a megalomaniac. The plot was partly inspired by the life of William Randolph Hearst, who then used the power of his own newspapers to try to suppress the film’s release. It was to take some years before Citizen Kane reached a fuller audience and, from that point, become so celebrated.

    The image above is of Kane addressing a public meeting while running for Governor.

    With

    Stella Bruzzi
    Professor of Film and Dean of Arts and Humanities at University College London

    Ian Christie
    Professor of Film and Media History at Birkbeck, University of London

    And

    John David Rhodes
    Professor of Film Studies and Visual Culture at the University of Cambridge

    Producer: Simon Tillotson

    • 53 min
    The Irish Rebellion of 1798

    The Irish Rebellion of 1798

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the momentum behind rebellion in Ireland in 1798, the people behind the rebellion and the impact over the next few years and after. Amid wider unrest, the United Irishmen set the rebellion on its way, inspired by the French and American revolutionaries and their pursuit of liberty. When it broke out in May the United Irishmen had an estimated two hundred thousand members, Catholic and Protestant, and the prospect of a French invasion fleet to back them. Crucially for the prospects of success, some of those members were British spies who exposed the plans and the military were largely ready - though not in Wexford where the scale of rebellion was much greater. The fighting was initially fierce and brutal and marked with sectarianism but had largely been suppressed by the time the French arrived in August to declare a short-lived republic. The consequences of the rebellion were to be far reaching, not least in the passing of Acts of Union in 1800.

    The image above is of Theobald Wolfe Tone (1763 - 1798), prominent member of the United Irishmen

    With

    Ian McBride
    Foster Professor of Irish History at Hertford College, University of Oxford

    Catriona Kennedy
    Senior Lecturer in Modern History at the University of York

    And

    Liam Chambers
    Head of Department and Senior Lecturer in History at Mary Immaculate College, Limerick

    Producer: Simon Tillotson

    • 55 min
    The Nibelungenlied

    The Nibelungenlied

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss The Song of the Nibelungs, a twelfth century German epic, full of blood, violence, fantasy and bleakness. It is a foundational work of medieval literature, drawing on the myths of Scandinavia and central Europe. The poem tells of two couples, Siegfried and Kriemhild and Gunther and Brunhilda, whose lives are destroyed by lies and revenge. It was extremely popular in its time, sometimes rewritten with happier endings, and was rediscovered by German Romantics and has since been drawn from selectively by Wagner, Fritz Lang and, infamously, the Nazis looking to support ideas on German heritage.

    The image above is of Siegfried seeing Kriemhild for the first time, a miniature from the Hundeshagenschen Code manuscript dating from 15th Century.

    With

    Sarah Bowden
    Reader in German and Medieval Studies at King’s College London

    Mark Chinca
    Professor of Medieval German and Comparative Literature at the University of Cambridge

    And

    Bettina Bildhauer
    Professor of Modern Languages at the University of St Andrews


    Producer: Simon Tillotson

    • 54 min
    The Challenger Expedition 1872-1876

    The Challenger Expedition 1872-1876

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the voyage of HMS Challenger which set out from Portsmouth in 1872 with a mission a to explore the ocean depths around the world and search for new life. The scale of the enterprise was breath taking and, for its ambition, it has since been compared to the Apollo missions. The team onboard found thousands of new species, proved there was life on the deepest seabeds and plumbed the Mariana Trench five miles below the surface. Thanks to telegraphy and mailboats, its vast discoveries were shared around the world even while Challenger was at sea, and they are still being studied today, offering insights into the ever-changing oceans that cover so much of the globe and into the health of our planet.

    The image above is from the journal of Pelham Aldrich R.N. who served on the Challenger Surveying Expedition from 1872-5.

    With

    Erika Jones
    Curator of Navigation and Oceanography at Royal Museums Greenwich

    Sam Robinson
    Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute Research Fellow at the University of Southampton

    And

    Giles Miller
    Principal Curator of Micropalaeontology at the Natural History Museum London


    Producer: Simon Tillotson

    • 51 min

Reseñas de clientes

4.7 de 5
6 calificaciones

6 calificaciones

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