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Bitcoin Magazine's Technical editor Aaron van Wirdum teams up with Bitcoin core contributor Sjors Provoost to explain Bitcoin one episode at a time.

Bitcoin Explained - The Technical Side of Bitcoin BTC Media

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Bitcoin Magazine's Technical editor Aaron van Wirdum teams up with Bitcoin core contributor Sjors Provoost to explain Bitcoin one episode at a time.

    Bitcoin, Explained 64: HD Wallets, Mnemonic codes and SeedQR

    Bitcoin, Explained 64: HD Wallets, Mnemonic codes and SeedQR

    In this episode of Bitcoin, Explained, hosts Aaron van Wirdum and Sjors Provoost discuss Hierarchical Deterministic (HD) Wallets, mnemonic codes, and — especially — the new SeedQR format which allows users to store their mnemonic codes as QR codes.
    Aaron and Sjors start the episode by recapping what HD Wallets (also known as private key seeds) are, and why they are preferred over regular private key backups. Next, they briefly explain why mnemonic codes (also known as seed phrases) are a popular solution for encoding and storing private key seeds.
    The Bitcoin, Explained hosts then go on to discuss SeedQR. SeedQR is a new format that allows Bitcoin users to encode and store their mnemonic code as a QR code. This means that mnemonic codes can be stored in a computer-readable format; any compatible device (like a hardware wallet with a camera) should be able to scan the QR code, and import all associated private keys.
    This could be useful for backups. but it could also be used so that wallets (including hardware wallets, but also mobile or desktop wallets) no longer have to store private keys at all. The QR code could be scanned when the wallet is used to send a transaction, after which the private keys could be forgotten by the device altogether. (SeedSigner is an open source, do-it-yourself hardware wallet that does exactly this.)
    Finally, Sjors goes over some of the intricacies of formatting a seed phrase to fit in a compact QR code, and some of the efficiency gains SeedQR uses to accomplish this.
     
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    • 29 Min.
    Bitcoin, Explained 63: The Bitcoin Core development process

    Bitcoin, Explained 63: The Bitcoin Core development process

    In this episode of Bitcoin, Explained, hosts Aaron van Wirdum and Sjors Provoost discuss the Bitcoin Core development process, and more specifically, the different roles that are involved in this process.
    At the start of the episode, Aaron and Sjors explain what Bitcoin Core is, both in a practical sense as well as in a more definitional sense, and they touch on some slightly different ideas about this as well.
    Aaron and Sjors then go on to explain the roles of three distinct types of Bitcoin Core contributors: “regular” Bitcoin Core contributors, Bitcoin Core maintainers, and the Bitcoin Core lead maintainer.
    Since there are no barriers to entry, anyone can become a Bitcoin Core contributor, Aaron and Sjors point out: anyone can start contributing to the Bitcoin Core project by offering code, review of code, or perhaps other types of contributions like text translations.
    Bitcoin Core maintainers, then, are Bitcoin Core contributors who can merge new code into the Bitcoin Core codebase. Aaron and Sjors explain what this means exactly, and how someone can become a Bitcoin maintainer.
    Finally, Aaron and Sjors go over some of the typical tasks of the Bitcoin Core lead maintainer, which includes managing the release process, adding and removing (other) Bitcoin Core maintainers to the project, and updating the bitcoincore.org website. They also discuss which of these tasks are in fact still done by the Bitcoin Core lead maintainer, however, and which tasks have over the years become more distributed.
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    • 39 Min.
    Bitcoin, Explained 62: Hash functions

    Bitcoin, Explained 62: Hash functions

    In this episode of Bitcoin, Explained, hosts Aaron van Wirdum and Sjors Provoost go back to basics. They explain one of the most fundamental building blocks in all of Bitcoin: hash functions.
    To start the episode off, Aaron and Sjors explain that hash functions are a type of mathematical one-way functions. That means that they can easily convert one piece of data into another piece of data, a hash, but anyone who knows only this hash can not convert it back to the original data. Additionally, a hash is supposed to be unique: no two (different) pieces of data should result in the same hash. If either of these things is no longer true, a hash function is considered to be broken.
    Then, Aaron and Sjors go on to explain in a little bit more detail how hash functions actually work. They discuss some aspects of the history and evolution of different hash functions, they mention some hash functions that have indeed been broken over time, and they pinpoint which hash functions are used in Bitcoin.
    Finally, Aaron and Sjors explain how hash functions are used in Bitcoin, exactly. This includes almost every aspect of the Bitcoin system, they point out, ranging from transactions (in multiple ways) and blocks, to addresses and the proof of work mechanism, as well as in relatively new upgrades like Taproot, and hash functions are even used to create some randomness needed to establish connections on the peer-to-peer network.

    • 35 Min.
    OP RETURN Wars - Episode 61

    OP RETURN Wars - Episode 61

    In this episode of Bitcoin, Explained, hosts Aaron van Wirdum and Sjors Provoost discuss OP_RETURN and what some have called the “OP_RETURN wars”. More specifically, they discuss a blog post by BitMEX research titled: “The OP_Return Wars of 2014 – Dapps Vs Bitcoin Transactions”.
    Aaron and Sjors start off by explaining that OP_RETURN is an op code (a piece of code for Bitcoin transactions) that will render invalid any transaction that includes it in an input. This means that outputs that include OP_RETURN are unspendeable, which in turn means that Bitcoin nodes can safely remove such UTXOs from their UTXO set, which safes on storage.
    Early in Bitcoin’s years, people started using Bitcoin for more than just transactions. As one example given by Sjors, someone uploaded the entire Bitcoin white paper onto the blockchain. The BitMEX blog meanwhile explains that Layer Two protocols like Counterparty were rolling out decentralized applications on the blockchain. This type of non-transaction data was initially embedded in multisig transactions, but this meant that all Bitcoin nodes had to download, process and store this data forever, which comes at a cost.
    To mitigate this problem, Aaron and Sjors explain, Bitcoin developers in 2014 agreed to let nodes process and forward transactions with OP_RETURN outputs. These transactions would be better for uploading data, since their outputs can be removed form the UTXO set.
    The “OP_RETURN wars” refer to a debate between Bitcoin developers and (most notably) Counterparty developers over the maximum size of such transactions. Sjors explains why the maximum of 40 bytes was initially choses, why this was later increased to 80 bytes, and how these considerations have changed over time.
    BitMEX’ blog post: https://blog.bitmex.com/dapps-or-only-bitcoin-transactions-the-2014-debate/
    Sjors’ book mentioned in the episode: https://www.btcwip.com/
    Evan Kaloudis tells P & Q what hyperbitcoinization means to him.
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    • 26 Min.
    Reusing addresses and the Hertzbleed attack - Episode 60

    Reusing addresses and the Hertzbleed attack - Episode 60

    In this episode of Bitcoin, Explained, hosts Aaron van Wirdum and Sjors Provoost discuss reusing Bitcoin addresses. More specifically, they explain why reusing Bitcoin addresses is a bad idea.

    Reusing Bitcoin addresses is a bad idea for roughly three reasons. The first two of these are that it harms privacy and impedes on the censorship resistance of Bitcoin. In the episode, Aaron and Sjors go over a couple examples of how such a loss of privacy and censorship resistance can negatively affect Bitcoin users.

    The third reason that reusing Bitcoin addresses is a bad idea, is that it opens up the possibility of some niche attacks. In certain cases, attackers could extract private keys from signatures after coins are first spent from an address — though this does require that a wallet implemented the signing algorithm wrongly in the first place. There are also some scenarios where quantum computers could in the future extract private keys from signatures if addresses are reused.

    Another type of niche attack is a timing sidechannel attack, such as the recently disclosed Hertzbleed Attack. Sjors explains that attackers can potentially derive a private key from a wallet by closely monitoring how the computer that hosts the wallet behaves when signing a transaction. This attack is more plausible if addresses are reused.

    Address reuse wiki: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Address_reuse#Security
    Hertzbleed attack: https://www.hertzbleed.com/

    • 33 Min.
    Has Bitcoin Ever Hard Forked? - Episode 59

    Has Bitcoin Ever Hard Forked? - Episode 59

    In this episode of Bitcoin, Explained, hosts Aaron van Wirdum and Sjors Provoost discuss a recent blog post by James Lopp titled, “Has Bitcoin Ever Hard Forked”?
     
    Hard forks are generally defined as Bitcoin protocol upgrades that remove or loosen rules, making these types of upgrades backwards-incompatible. Aaron and Sjors explain, however, that Lopp in his blog post argues that this definition isn’t very precise and suggests the term should only apply if the rule change was actually utilized. In addition, hard forks can be categorized into explicit hard forks, where the rule change was an intentional hard fork, and implicit hard forks, where the rule change wasn’t originally intended to be a hard fork at all but turned out to be one anyways.

    In the second half of the podcast, Aaron and Sjors break down the seven hard forks in Bitcoin’s history that Lopp was able to find, of which five were never utilized (and should therefore arguably not be considered hard forks at all), one was explicit, and one was implicit.

    Finally, Aaron and Sjors briefly discuss (a) future hard fork(s) that need(s) to happen, and what kind of philosophy around deploying hard forks might make sense for Bitcoin.

    Jameson Lopp’s blog post: https://blog.lopp.net/has-bitcoin-ever-hard-forked/

    • 40 Min.

Kundenrezensionen

5,0 von 5
2 Bewertungen

2 Bewertungen

PeterLBitcoin ,

One of the best technical Bitcoin Podcasts

I really enjoy each of your episodes. Excellent technical Bitcoin aspects very well explained. Please keep on doing the Podcast!

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