100 Folgen

Podcast featuring the top Compliance and Ethics thought leaders from around the globe. The Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics and the Health Care Compliance Association will keep you up to date on enforcement trends, current events, and best practices in the compliance and ethics arena. To submit ideas and questions, please email: service@corporatecompliance.org

Compliance Perspectives SCCE

    • Bildung

Podcast featuring the top Compliance and Ethics thought leaders from around the globe. The Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics and the Health Care Compliance Association will keep you up to date on enforcement trends, current events, and best practices in the compliance and ethics arena. To submit ideas and questions, please email: service@corporatecompliance.org

    Lisa Miller on the World Bank, Sanctions and the Integrity Compliance Office [Podcast]

    Lisa Miller on the World Bank, Sanctions and the Integrity Compliance Office [Podcast]

    Post By: Adam Turteltaub



    The World Bank is a powerful force for development in the world, and, unfortunately, the large sums of money it invests are often the target of fraudsters and the corrupt.



    To help protect the Bank’s investments, the Integrity Vice Presidency stands guard, explains Lisa Miller, Head of the Integrity Compliance Office and Compliance Officer at the World Bank Group.  It is responsible for helping ensure that Bank funds have been used for the purpose intended.



    The office’s ambit includes investigating cases of fraud and corruption from start to finish.  There is an intake team that looks into allegations and, if warranted investigates them.  And, should the evidence indicate wrongdoing, the investigators and litigators take the allegations through the sanctions system.



    The consequences for an organization when an allegation has been substantiated, she shares in this podcast, can be quite severe.



    Whether the case leads to a settlement or a debarment – typically for three years – a business can only regain eligibility to bid on World Bank projects if it meets several conditions, including, typically, an integrity compliance program that reflects World Bank principles.



    Listen in to learn more about what the Bank expects to see in a compliance program both before and after an incident occurs.  And don’t miss the fact that having a strong compliance program can earn credit, even if improper behavior is found.

    • 15 Min.
    Larry Reicher on the Antitrust Division’s Office of Decree Enforcement [Podcast]

    Larry Reicher on the Antitrust Division’s Office of Decree Enforcement [Podcast]

    Post By: Adam Turteltaub



    The approach to compliance programs of the Antitrust Division at the US Department of Justice has evolved considerably over the last few years, starting with the release of their watershed Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Programs in Criminal Antitrust Investigations in July 2019. This document was a dramatic step forward in providing recognition of compliance programs and encouraged prosecutors to consider three fundamental questions:



    * Is the corporate compliance program well designed?

    * Is the program being applied earnestly and in good faith?

    * Does the corporation’s compliance program work?



    In August 2020 the DOJ followed up with the creation of the Office of Decree Enforcement and Compliance (ODEC) to provide additional resources for criminal and civil antitrust cases.



    In this podcast Larry Reicher, the ODEC Chief, explains that the Office has multiple goals.  First, it seeks to ensure that companies are compliant with decrees. There have been instances in the last few years in which parties had not lived up to their obligations.



    ODEC is also charged with acting as a resource for the Criminal Section of the Antitrust Division as it analyzes compliance programs in companies seeking to earn credit for them. In addition, the Office is responsible for the section of monitors, when one is required.



    Its role is also to incentify compliance and good citizenship and, ideally, prevent problems from happening in the first place. To help achieve that goal ODEC looks for four common traits in organizations:



    * A commitment to a culture of compliance

    * The company self-reports properly

    * Full and timely cooperation

    * Thorough and timely remediation



    In addition, they are particularly focused on determining if the compliance program is tailored to the industry and company, not an off-the-shelf exercise.



    Listen in to learn more about ODEC as well as the Department of Justice’s expectations and rewards for effective antitrust compliance programs.

    • 15 Min.
    Lori McGee on Corporate Jets and Compliance [Podcast]

    Lori McGee on Corporate Jets and Compliance [Podcast]

    Post By: Adam Turteltaub



    Corporate jets come with large fuel bills and, as we learn in this podcast from Lori McGee, partner at Jetstream Law, substantial compliance requirements.



    It begins with the registration, which, perhaps to the surprise of many, include US citizen requirements for officers of the corporation.  In addition, some of the rules are fairly nuanced.  Any changes to corporate ownership or even membership changes to an LLC may trigger an obligation to update information on file with the FAA.  It may sound like a technicality, but if the aircraft is involved in an incident, having the incorrect information on file may be sufficient for the insurer to claim the aircraft wasn’t properly operated.



    Thinking about allowing personal use of the aircraft by an executive?  Before you do so, you need to consider both FAA and IRS rules she cautions.  Having the executive reimburse the company can be problematic on the FAA side since they general prohibit seeking reimbursement.  On the IRS side, if use of the jet is treated as a benefit, there may be tax implications.  And, if the organization is publicly-traded, there may be SEC considerations as well.



    Even maintenance issues have compliance requirements since aircraft financial firms may require the aircraft to be enrolled in a maintenance or parts program.  If the mechanic or pilot don’t know that and jettison the program to save cost, it could prove costly.



    Listen is to learn more about the compliance perils of private aviation.

    • 11 Min.
    Maddie Bainer of HHS on the Special Fraud Alert on Speakers Programs [Podcast]

    Maddie Bainer of HHS on the Special Fraud Alert on Speakers Programs [Podcast]

    Post By: Adam Turteltaub



    On November 16, 2020 the Office of Inspector General (OIG) at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a Special Fraud Alert focused on “fraud and abuse risks associated with the offer, payment, solicitation, or receipt of remuneration relating to speaker programs by pharmaceutical and medical device companies.”



    To better understand the alert and the compliance implications, we sat down with Maddie Bainer, Senior Counsel, Office of Counsel to the Inspector General. In this podcast she explains that the alert was triggered by what OIG saw as a troubling trend of manufacturers sponsoring events in which healthcare professionals were paid to speak to their peers at entertainment and sports venues and very high end restaurants. There were even cases in which the physician paid to speak never actually spoke, and the audience was made up of individuals which no professional reason to be in attendance.



    Such practices had already led to at least one high profile settlement, and to curb the practices the OIG issues the Alert.



    The Special Fraud Alert provides a list of “suspect characteristics”, Bainer explains, that could be indicative of problematic behavior:



    * The company sponsors speaker programs where little or no substantive information is actually presented;

    * Alcohol is available or a meal exceeding modest value is provided to the attendees of the program (the concern is heightened when the alcohol is free);

    * The program is held at a location that is not conducive to the exchange of educational information (e.g., restaurants or entertainment or sports venues);

    * The company sponsors a large number of programs on the same or substantially the same topic or product, especially in situations involving no recent substantive change in relevant information;

    * There has been a significant period of time with no new medical or scientific information nor a new FDA-approved or cleared indication for the product; 11 Id. at 23. 5

    * Health Care Professionals (HCPs) attend programs on the same or substantially the same topics more than once (as either a repeat attendee or as an attendee after being a speaker on the same or substantially the same topic);

    * Attendees include individuals who don’t have a legitimate business reason to attend the program, including, for example, friends, significant others, or family members of the speaker or HCP attendee; employees or medical professionals who are members of the speaker’s own medical practice; staff of facilities for which the speaker is a medical director; and other individuals with no use for the information;

    * The company’s sales or marketing business units influence the selection of speakers or the company selects HCP speakers or attendees based on past or expected revenue that the speakers or attendees have or will generate by prescribing or ordering the company’s product(s) (e.g., a return on investment analysis is considered in identifying participants);

    * The company pays HCP speakers more than fair market value for the speaking service or pays compensation that takes into account the volume or value of past business generated or potential future business generated by the HCPs.



    These characteristics should be noted not just be manufacturers but also by practitioners and the health care providers that employ them. As she points out, the Anti-Kickback statue applies both to those offering the rem...

    • 14 Min.
    Jeffrey Kaplan on Assessing Corporate Culture [Podcast]

    Jeffrey Kaplan on Assessing Corporate Culture [Podcast]

    Post By: Adam Turteltaub



    Having the right corporate culture is essential to an effective compliance program, but building and assessing that culture can be a very tricky thing. Few know this better than Jeffrey Kaplan, a partner in the firm Kaplan & Walker, who specializes in compliance program assessments.



    There is an eagerness, he explains to measure the culture, but doing so in a quantitative way can be difficult. Some things just don’t lend themselves to a numbers-based score. In those cases it’s best to rely on common sense born of experience.



    What should compliance teams look for when assessing culture? He recommends examining several factors including:



    * Tone at the middle

    * How easy it is to speak up in the organization on all issues, not just compliance

    * Organizational justice

    * How conflicts of interest are managed

    * The industry’s culture

    * How customers are treated

    * Incentive plans

    * Rule following



    There is a lot of subtlety in these measures. For example, while on the whole it’s good to have a culture where the rules are followed, there could be a cost if ethics is not considered.



    He also encourages granularity: don’t just look at the culture as a whole. It should be examined by geography and even department.



    Listen in to learn more about how to better assess your own organization’s culture, or cultures, and the best way to present the findings to management.

    • 15 Min.
    What’s New in the Healthcare Privacy Compliance Handbook, 3rd Edition [Podcast]

    What’s New in the Healthcare Privacy Compliance Handbook, 3rd Edition [Podcast]

    Post By: Adam Turteltaub



    Recently the Health Care Compliance Association released the new Health Care Privacy Handbook, 3rd Edition. To learn what’s new in the book and in healthcare privacy we sat down with editorial lead Darrell W. Contreras, Chief Compliance Officer, Millennium Health and one of the authors, David Nelson, PrivacyGuy Solution.



    As they explain in the podcast, the new version provides a baseline on updates to the many laws and regulations affecting privacy in the healthcare industry, including:



    * HIPAA

    * Breach notifications

    * Research

    * FERPA

    * Health plan and payer issues

    * 42 CFR Part 2

    * The Privacy Act of 1974



    There are also tips and guides for privacy professionals.



    What makes the book so valuable, they explain, is that the contributors were able to provide not just what the rules say but also a perspective from years of experience, helping to make complex issues easier to understand.



    Staying current on these issues is more important than ever, with Homeland Security warning of increased phishing attempts by bad actors during the pandemic, a time when many people are working remotely and on less-secured laptops.



    Listen in to learn more about what’s going on in privacy and what you can find inside the pages of the third edition of the Healthcare Privacy Compliance Handbook.

    • 14 Min.

Top‑Podcasts in Bildung

Zuhörer haben auch Folgendes abonniert: