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Decoder is a show from The Verge about big ideas — and other problems. Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel talks to a diverse cast of innovators and policymakers at the frontiers of business and technology to reveal how they’re navigating an ever-changing landscape, what keeps them up at night, and what it all means for our shared future.

Decoder with Nilay Patel Vox Media Podcast Network

    • Wirtschaft
    • 4,5 • 99 Bewertungen

Decoder is a show from The Verge about big ideas — and other problems. Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel talks to a diverse cast of innovators and policymakers at the frontiers of business and technology to reveal how they’re navigating an ever-changing landscape, what keeps them up at night, and what it all means for our shared future.

    Dropbox CEO Drew Houston wants you to embrace AI and remote work

    Dropbox CEO Drew Houston wants you to embrace AI and remote work

    At the absolute most basic, Dropbox is cloud storage for your stuff — but that puts it at the nexus of a huge number of today’s biggest challenges in tech. As the company that helps you organize your stuff in the cloud itself goes all remote, how do we even deal with the concept of “your stuff?”

    Today I’m talking with Dropbox CEO Drew Houston about those big picture ideas — and why he thinks generative AI really will be transformative for everyone eventually, even if it isn’t yet now.

    Links: 

    Dropbox AI and Dash make it easier to find your files from all over the web | The Verge

    Kids who grew up with search engines could change STEM forever | The Verge

    No, Dropbox's cafeteria didn't get a Michelin star | VentureBeat

    It's official: San Francisco's office vacancy rate just set a record | San Francisco Examiner

    Jeff Bezos: This is the 'smartest thing we ever did' at Amazon | CNBC

    Dropbox is laying off 500 people and pivoting to AI | The Verge

    Congress bans staff use of Microsoft's AI Copilot | Axios


    Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23892647

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Kate Cox and Nick Statt and was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 Std. 4 Min.
    The rise and fall of Vice Media

    The rise and fall of Vice Media

    Today we’re talking about Vice, the media company: Where it came from, what it did, and, ultimately, why it collapsed into a much smaller, sadder version of itself. 

    This is a lousy time for digital media, and it’s hard to make a profit from putting words on the internet right now. So when Verge senior reporter Liz Lopatto went to go report on what happened, she and I both assumed Vice had been done in by the brutal economics of digital advertising on the web. But the Vice story is more than that — in the word of one executive that talked to Liz, it was a “fucking clown show.” 

    Links:

    How Vice became 'a fucking clown show' — The Verge


    Vice is abandoning Vice.com and laying off hundreds — The Verge


    Vice, decayed digital colossus, files for bankruptcy — NYT


    Vice Is Basically Dead — New York Magazine


    Shane Smith and the Final Collapse of Vice News — The Hollywood Reporter


    At Vice, cutting-edge media and allegations of old-school sexual harassment — NYT


    HBO cancels ‘Vice News Tonight,’ severing relationship with Vice Media — CNN


    Shane Smith has a secret multimillion-dollar Vice deal — New York Magazine



    Credits: 
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.

    Today’s episode was produced by Kate Cox and Nick Statt and was edited by Callie Wright. Our supervising producer is Liam James.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.

    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 43 Min.
    Why Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince is the internet’s unlikely defender

    Why Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince is the internet’s unlikely defender

    Cloudflare is an infrastructure provider basically protecting more than 20% of the entire web from bad actors. When everything is going well, you don't even have to know it exists. It's one of the only defenses — sometimes the only defense — standing between websites and the people who want to take them down.

    Protecting free speech on the internet around the world, across war zones and hundreds of different kinds of government, is no easy feat. That puts the company, and CEO Matthew Prince, right at the heart of some of Decoder's biggest challenges and themes. 

    Links: 

    A Cloudflare outage broke large swathes of the internet | The Verge

    Why security company Cloudflare is protecting U.S. election sites for free | Fast Company

    The Daily Stormer just lost the most important company defending it | The Verge (2017)

    Cloudflare to revoke 8chan’s service, opening the fringe website up for DDoS attacks | The Verge (2019)

    Cloudflare blocks Kiwi Farms due to an ‘immediate threat to human life’ | The Verge

    Why Cloudflare Let an Extremist Stronghold Burn | Wired

    Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince interview on Ukraine cybersecurity | Semafor

    3 ways the ‘splinternet’ is damaging society | MIT Sloan


    Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23885440

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Kate Cox and Nick Statt and was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 Std. 19 Min.
    Why Nintendo sued a Switch emulator out of existence

    Why Nintendo sued a Switch emulator out of existence

    Hello, and welcome to Decoder. This is David Pierce, editor-at-large at The Verge and co-host of The Vergecast, subbing in for Nilay, who’s out on vacation. Regular Decoder programming returns next week. In the meantime, we have an exciting episode for you today all about video game emulation, which, as it turns out, is a whole lot more complicated than it seems. 

    Gaming emulation made headlines recently because one of the most widely used programs for emulating the Nintendo Switch, a platform called Yuzu, was effectively sued out of existence. There’s a whole lot going on here, from the history of game emulation to the copyright precedents of emulators to how the threat of game piracy still looms large in the industry. To break down this topic, I brought Verge Senior Editor and resident emulation expert Sean Hollister on the show. Let’s get into it. 

    Links:

    Nintendo sues Switch emulator Yuzu — The Verge


    Nintendo Switch emulator Yuzu will fold and pay $2.4M to settle its lawsuit — The Verge


    Steve Jobs announcing a PlayStation emulator for the Mac — YouTube


    Fans freak out as Zelda: Tears of the Kingdom leaks two weeks early — Kotaku


    Tears of the Kingdom Was Pirated 1 Million Times, Nintendo Claims — Kotaku


    The solid legal theory behind Nintendo’s new emulator takedown effort — Ars Technica


    How Nintendo’s destruction of Yuzu is rocking the emulator world — The Verge


    How strong is Nintendo’s legal case against Switch-emulator Yuzu? — Ars Technica



    Credits: 
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.

    Today’s episode was produced by Kate Cox and Nick Statt and was edited by Callie Wright. Our supervising producer is Liam James.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. 
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 43 Min.
    Mailchimp CEO Rania Succar on culture, acquisitions, and how big 'small business' really is

    Mailchimp CEO Rania Succar on culture, acquisitions, and how big 'small business' really is

    Today, I’m talking to Intuit Mailchimp CEO Rania Succar, who took over as CEO in 2022 after a pretty rough patch in the company’s history. In 2021, Intuit acquired the company, and the very next year, co-founder Ben Chestnut stepped down after telling employees that he thought introducing themselves with pronouns in meetings did more harm than good. After that, Rania took over.
    This is a pretty huge culture change, especially as Mailchimp became more integrated with Intuit. It was also a big challenge for a new leader who came in from the outside. You’ll hear us talk about that transition a lot. Rania and I also got into the weeds of making decisions, which is very Decoder. And, of course, we had to talk about generative AI, which is a big part of the Mailchimp road map. This was a really fun conversation with some honestly scary ideas in it — and it’s all about email.

    Links:

    Mailchimp employees have complained about inequality for years — The Verge


    Mailchimp Employees Are Fuming Over $12 Billion Deal — Business Insider


    Did this email cost Mailchimp's billionaire CEO his job? — Platformer


    Mailchimp is shutting down TinyLetter — The Verge


    TinyLetter, in memoriam — The Verge


    Did Mailchimp censor J.D. Vance? — Mother Jones


    Hackers breached Mailchimp to phish cryptocurrency wallets — The Verge


    Boring, mundane businesses have an exhilarating, viral life on TikTok — The Verge



    Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23879556

    Credits: 
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Kate Cox and Nick Statt and was edited by Callie Wright. Our supervising producer is Liam James.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 Std. 6 Min.
    Can you patent a pizza?

    Can you patent a pizza?

    Hey everyone it’s Nilay – I’m on vacation this week, so the Decoder team is taking a short break. We’ll be back next week with both the interview and the new explainer episodes. To tide you over until Monday, we have a bonus episode from our friends at Vox Media and Eater’s Gastropod about an incredible patent battle in the world of pizza. 

    I’m serious: One of the biggest fights in the pizza industry took place in US court in the ‘90s — an intellectual property dispute about stuffed crust pizza between Pizza Hut and patent holder Anthony “The Big Cheese” Mongiello. 

    So much of what we talk about on Decoder comes down to IP lawsuits like copyright or patent disputes, and how judges decide those cases and where the law ends up can steer the course of history. And that’s true whether we’re talking about a line of code, the distribution method of an MP3, or, yes, even stuffed crust pizza. 
    Links: 


    Can You Patent a Pizza? — Gastropod


    Ivana and Donald Trump Pizza Hut Commercial — YouTube


    The Next Big Thing in Pizza? Try 'Stuffed Crust' — NYT


    Who Created the Stuffed Crust Pizza? It's Complicated. — Eater


    Method of making a pizza — Google Patents



    Credits: 
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Kate Cox and Nick Statt and was edited by Callie Wright. Our supervising producer is Liam James.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 52 Min.

Kundenrezensionen

4,5 von 5
99 Bewertungen

99 Bewertungen

ph:l ,

Best tech podcast

Love the new format with two episodes per week!

Assix98 ,

Great interview partners, great questions

I like that the guests are actually given enough time to explain their thinking.

Forester 1 ,

Impossible to listen to anymore

Suffers of the same awkwardish, self-congratulatory attempt of trying hard to appear smart and relevant.

Why can’t media people just let the news talk? We don’t need every single person dealing with news being so much of a mascot and a acting like a movie star.

50 percent of the time you hear the host talk. Does he love the sound of his voice?

“Rock n Roll”

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