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Alex Williams, founder of The New Stack, hosts "The New Stack Analysts," a biweekly round-table discussion covering The New Stack's latest data research, and topics related to app development and back-end services.

Listen to our other TNS Podcasts on SoundCloud:

The New Stack Makers: https://soundcloud.com/thenewstackmakers

The New Stack Context: https://soundcloud.com/thenewstackcontext

The New Stack @ Scale: https://soundcloud.com/thenewstackatscale

The New Stack Analysts The New Stack

    • Technologie

Alex Williams, founder of The New Stack, hosts "The New Stack Analysts," a biweekly round-table discussion covering The New Stack's latest data research, and topics related to app development and back-end services.

Listen to our other TNS Podcasts on SoundCloud:

The New Stack Makers: https://soundcloud.com/thenewstackmakers

The New Stack Context: https://soundcloud.com/thenewstackcontext

The New Stack @ Scale: https://soundcloud.com/thenewstackatscale

    KubeCon San Diego Pancakes: Shifting Cloud Native Security All the Way Left

    KubeCon San Diego Pancakes: Shifting Cloud Native Security All the Way Left

    Many IT teams begin moving their applications to containers and Kubernetes after their managers mandate the switch. Then in the rush to deploy they may forget, or simply delay, some fundamentals. Only six to 12 months later does integrating security into their CI/CD pipeline becomes a priority.

    This gradual evolution toward cloud native security best practices is worrisome, but it’s the norm among organizations adopting Kubernetes today. This is what we learned from a panel of cloud native security experts at The New Stack’s pancake and podcast from KubeCon+CloudNativeCon North America this week. The New Stack founder and publisher Alex Williams was joined on the panel by:

    Keith Mokris, product marketing manager, container security at Palo Alto Networks; Maya Kaczorowski, product manager at Google.
    Santiago Torres-Arias, Ph.D. student at New York University Center for Cyber Security; Sarah Allen, co-chair of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s (CNCF) Security Special Interest Group (SIG); Sean M. Kerner, senior editor at InternetNews.com.

    Prisma by Palo Alto Networks sponsored this podcast.

    • 47 Min.
    Cloud Foundry Summit Europe: Why Kubernetes Should be Boring

    Cloud Foundry Summit Europe: Why Kubernetes Should be Boring

    The developer will certainly face new challenges when making the switch to a cloud native platform. The process might include, for example, learning how to add code to Kubernetes clusters or mastering the mechanics of etcd and kubectlis. The power and scaling flexibility a cloud native platform and Kubernetes offer, among other things, are often worth more than developers’ investment in time and resources when adopting these technologies.

    And yet.

    What developers are usually more concerned about is the business goals they need to achieve. They will likely care less what the underlying infrastructure is as much as it can be used to create code that might improve their organization’s bottom line, or for a public institution, better meet the needs of a citizen.

    In this episode of The New Stack Analysts recorded at the 2019 European Cloud Foundry Summit in The Hague, The Netherlands, this month where the business needs of developers and the role of the Cloud Foundry community were dicussed — and debated.

    Hosted by Alex Williams, The New Stack founder and editor-in-chief and co-hosted by Devin Davis, vice president of marketing, Cloud Foundry Foundation, the panelists were:

    Abby Kearns, executive director, Cloud Foundry Foundation
    Michael Cote, marketing director, Pivotal
    Tammy Van Hove, distinguished engineer, IBM
    Udo Seidel, Tech Writer, Heise iX

    • 33 Min.
    TC Sessions Pancake Breakfast: Software Startups Drive Enterprise Change with Education and Openness

    TC Sessions Pancake Breakfast: Software Startups Drive Enterprise Change with Education and Openness

    Enterprise startups are building the tools that help their customers to create an agile modern enterprise that adapts quickly to market changes. But the enterprise isn’t always open to that change, or even aware of the benefits of that change, said Frederic Lardinois, writer and news editor at TechCrunch, in this episode of The New Stack Analysts recorded at TechCrunch Sessions: Enterprise held on Sept. 5 in San Francisco. This is a primary challenge for enterprise software companies today.

    The people and technologies that help enterprise software startups grow was the focus of this recent panel discussion at The New Stack pancake breakfast and podcast at TC Sessions: Enterprise. TNS founder and publisher Alex Williams moderated the discussion, which was sponsored by GitLab. Panelists included:

    1. Frederic Lardinois / writer & news editor / TechCrunch
    2. Katherine Boyle / Principal / General Catalyst
    3. Melissa Pancoast / founder & CEO / The Beans
    4. Sameer Patel / former CEO / Kahuna
    5. Sid Sijbrandij / co-founder & CEO / GitLab

    • 52 Min.
    The Choices Enterprises Must Make in Open Source’s ‘Post-Punk Rock Era’

    The Choices Enterprises Must Make in Open Source’s ‘Post-Punk Rock Era’

    What became the punk rock genre may be a harbinger of what is in store for the open source movement —  but hopefully not. At any rate, open source’s popularity can certainly be compared to punk rock’s rise. When Linux began to be seen as a powerful and very practical alternative to Unix, and especially, Windows, during the 1990s, the movement then felt very...well, underground.

    Trading discs of Linux distros and sharing tips on how to hack “Doom” (okay, the hacks were open source but Doom’s code was obviously wasn’t). But hopefully, open source will take a different path than what became of punk rock, especially for enterprises, as open matures, or to take the punk rock analogy further, become corporate musak.

    The punk rock comparison was one a main theme of this episode of The New Stack Makers podcast recorded during VMware World San Francisco, with guests Tom Petrocelli, a research fellow at Amalgam Insights, and Adam Jacob, CEO at The System Initiative and former CTO of Chef Software. They described what the open source movement has become and where it’s heading, and more importantly, what it all means for enterprises.

    • 47 Min.
    Will Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Disrupt DevOps?

    Will Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Disrupt DevOps?

    It would be a mistake to ignore the immediate impact artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) is already having on software development processes and DevOps. While some may see AI and ML as new technologies high on the hype cycle with overall marginal influences — even though they have been available for years — many organizations are already taking advantage of how they can automate many tasks during the development process. This includes their role in performing more mundane and time-consuming tasks that developers, as well as operations staffers, would prefer not to do by letting the machine take over.

    During this The New Stack Analysts podcast, two DevOps and development process experts spoke about AI’s and ML’s effects on DevOps and the state of algorithm development today and it impact on IT operations today: Hyoun Park, CEO and chief analyst, Amalgam Insights, and Bola Rotibi, Research Director, Software Development, CCS Insight. This roundtable was hosted by Alex Williams, founder and editor in chief of The New Stack.

    Already, AI and ML are affecting DevOps workflows have provided “an amazing access to computing and processing” over the past few years, Park said. They have provided DevOps with the ability to test a wide variety of algorithmic strategies, as well as provide storage and data-management capabilities to handle the processing, the testing and benefits associated with machine learning, and artificial intelligence.

    • 42 Min.
    The Rapid State of Container Adoption

    The Rapid State of Container Adoption

    Just four years ago, industry analysts were wary of running production workloads in containers, but certainly the industry got over that fast. Numbers around Docker and Kubernetes adoption vary broadly, but it's safe to say that well over half of Fortune 100 companies have embraced containers.

    In this episode of The New Stack Analysts, our Editor in Chief Alex Williams sits down with Briana Frank, director of product management at IBM, and James Ford, independent technical strategy advisor, to reflect on the origins of containers, how Kubernetes and Docker began, and how adoption has grown so fast in only a few years.

    Frank said the impetus behind rapid container adoption came from Docker allowing everyone to get started quickly and simply —  about ten minutes. For her, this accessibility is a continued source of inspiration when she's creating demos and Getting Started tutorials, as this ease of use accelerates innovation.

    “We can attribute a lot of the popularity of Kubernetes today to the Docker beginnings,” she said.

    • 39 Min.

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