37 episodes

Intimate stories and surprising truths about nature, science and the human experience in a podcast the size of the planet.
Each week the BBC Earth podcast brings you a collection of immersive stories about our world and the astonishing creatures, landscapes and elements in it. Close your eyes and open your ears as you travel from the impenetrable forests of Uganda to research bases in the Antarctic; the edges of the Thar Desert to the Shores of Lake Tahoe. You’ll get up close and personal with jewelled beetles in the Namib Desert and soar with eagles in Rajasthan as you experience tales of human emotion, of encounters with animals, of the strangest corners of the Earth and breath-taking marvels. All carefully gathered together and delivered into your ear by the good people at BBC Earth.
From the deepest caves in the world to the very edge of space the BBC Earth podcast transports you on an awe-inspiring journey in sound.

BBC Earth Podcast BBC Earth

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.2 • 10 Ratings

Intimate stories and surprising truths about nature, science and the human experience in a podcast the size of the planet.
Each week the BBC Earth podcast brings you a collection of immersive stories about our world and the astonishing creatures, landscapes and elements in it. Close your eyes and open your ears as you travel from the impenetrable forests of Uganda to research bases in the Antarctic; the edges of the Thar Desert to the Shores of Lake Tahoe. You’ll get up close and personal with jewelled beetles in the Namib Desert and soar with eagles in Rajasthan as you experience tales of human emotion, of encounters with animals, of the strangest corners of the Earth and breath-taking marvels. All carefully gathered together and delivered into your ear by the good people at BBC Earth.
From the deepest caves in the world to the very edge of space the BBC Earth podcast transports you on an awe-inspiring journey in sound.

    Finding what doesn't want to be found

    Finding what doesn't want to be found

    In the final episode of series 4, we’re digging into some of the more elusive corners of our planet.


    To begin, we’re on a bear hunt deep in the Bornean rainforest. Guiding us is Siew Te Wong, who is the world’s foremost authority on a bear we know very little about. The sun bear is the smallest bear in the world and, as Wong has discovered for himself, tracking them can draw up some unexpected discoveries.


    Next we’re turning our attention upwards, to the sky at night. Or, to be more precise, to the sounds that come from it. Magnus Robb explores what birdsong can tell us about the extraordinary migration routes of these animals.


    To end, we sit still to see the visible changes over time to our glaciers. Using past and present technology, Kieran Baxter brings to life some of the unprecedented declines in our natural world.


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.


    As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…


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    • 32 min
    Saving the world's rarest marine mammal

    Saving the world's rarest marine mammal

    In this episode, we’re delving into the topic of extinction. We'll be finding out about some of the animals who are critically endangered, meeting the people trying to rescue them, and exploring species who may be able to make miraculous comebacks.


    Perhaps one of the most endangered species is the vaquita, a small sea mammal with a population of less than 20. We hear from some extraordinary people weathering threats and tragedies in an attempt to bring these ‘pandas of the ocean’ back from the brink. 


    According to US Department of Agriculture researcher, Dr Samuel Ramsey, every discovery is built upon a discovery that came before it. Yet some of those discoveries can be found in the most unexpected of places. For Samuel, understanding his father’s health issues provided the key to discovering why honeybee populations are on the decrease.


    And to finish, we’re asking one of the biggest questions in paleontology: how did birds evolve from dinosaurs? To help us explore this topic, we’ve got the help of Jingmai O’Connor whose work in China has helped shed light on the distant link between the extinct dinosaur and ballooning bird populations.


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.


    As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…


    Website: www.bbcearth.com
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth 
     
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    • 32 min
    The artists of the animal kingdom

    The artists of the animal kingdom

    In this episode, we’re displaying the most impressive artists of the animal kingdom. From tiny visual masterpieces, to animals that can dance to a beat, we’re shining a spotlight on the art that can be found in nature.


    Deep in the Amazon rainforest, there’s a tiny structure that (if you’re able to spot it) catches your eye. The intricate silk henge is a mini masterpiece, and for some time nobody could say exactly what it was or why it existed. Phil Torres takes us on his journey of discovery and demystification.


    Next we’re exploring whether animals can dance to a beat and, if so, why? To help us try and answer that, we hear from Henkjan Honing, professor of Music Cognition at the University of Amsterdam. 


    Finally, we turn our attention to Northern Australia’s great bowerbird. What can the males' elaborate constructions teach us about perspective?


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.


    As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…


    Website: www.bbcearth.com
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/
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    Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth 
     
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    • 28 min
    I became part of a lionesses family

    I became part of a lionesses family

    While nature is full of beauty and wonder, it also has a deadly side. In this episode, we're getting a brush with death and exploring how nature can be both a source of comfort and a source of danger.


    Prosanta Chakrabarty spends his time studying different species of fish in some of the world's most hostile spots. He leads us into a deep, dark cave in Madagascar where he and his team didn't just discover a new species, but also discovered a new illness.


    We’ll be introduced to the unlikely ‘assassins of the sea’: cone snails. Mande Holford explains how these extraordinary creatures can both kill and cure us.


    And finally, we hear how a lioness chose to share her most intimate moments of life and death with African wildlife expert, Gareth Patterson.


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.


    As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…


    Website: www.bbcearth.com
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth 
     
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    • 31 min
    What the deep ocean can teach us about life

    What the deep ocean can teach us about life

    We’re exploring the parts of our world that require us to look a little deeper. From the depths of our oceans to the canopies that grace our skylines, we’ll be venturing into unfamiliar pockets of nature with the people who have carved a life out of choosing to study the things that many of us can’t see.


    First up, we meet Matthew Doogue who finds solace in capturing small things. He tells us how photographing the tiniest creatures has helped him find a greater sense of happiness.


    We also travel to the bottom of the ocean, and discover how even in the most extreme environments fragments of life persist. What can this alien environment teach us about life’s limits and extraordinary capabilities?


    And finally we head upwards into the canopies of trees with ecologist Nalini Nadkarni. She invites us to to experience canopy life, and reflects upon what it can teach us about relationships and recovery.


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.


    As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…


    Website: www.bbcearth.com
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth 
     
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    • 26 min
    The desert rocks that 'sing'

    The desert rocks that 'sing'

    We’re exploring the boundary between our world and the world of myth, mysticism, and magic. We’ll discover how some of the customs and practices from our ancient ancestors continue to influence our relationship with the natural world today.


    To begin, we’re opening our ears to some of the sounds of the natural world and the inanimate objects that produce them. On a trip to Serengeti, Jahawi stumbled across rocks which, when hit by another type of rock, produced different sounds. He leads us into the world of the rocks that ‘sing’.
     
    The Baka are one of the oldest hunter gatherer societies in the world. They’re physically and spiritually connected to the forests they inhabit. This connection runs so deep that they believe their top hunters have the ability to experience the world from another animal’s point of view.


    And in South Africa she’s known as the ‘frog lady’, but Dr Jeanne Tarrant didn’t always love them. Like many others, she grew up scared of frogs. Now, however, she works tirelessly to protect them, which includes dispelling some surprising myths that continue to put the lives of these amphibians at risk.


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.


    As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…


    Website: www.bbcearth.com
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth 
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

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