148 episodes

Emergency Medicine podcasts based on evidence based medicine focussed on practice in and around the resus room.

The Resus Room Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates

    • Medicine
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Emergency Medicine podcasts based on evidence based medicine focussed on practice in and around the resus room.

    Toxidromes; Roadside to Resus

    Toxidromes; Roadside to Resus

    Drug ingestion both accidental and intentional accounts for a significant proportion of attendances at UK Emergency Departments and 999 calls.
    In 2016 there were >2,500 registered deaths in England and Wales related to drug misuse, which had increased by nearly 60% in a decade.
    So without a doubt we are all going to come across critically unwell patients with drug ingestions. But inappropriate drug use is not confined to illicit substances, with many prescription drugs being misused to ill effect and also overdosed in an attempt to end patients lives.
    In this podcast we’re going to run through the assessment of patients presenting with a possible drug ingestion, cover the potential toxidromes you may encounter and talk about the management of these presentations. Specifically we take a look at serotonin syndrome, sedative toxidrome and both cholinergic and anti-cholinergic syndrome.
    In next months Roadside to Resus we'll take a look at specific medications of overdose; paracetamol, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers and the intricacies of their management along with other key parts of critical care including the management of cardiac arrest due to toxicity.
    Make sure to take a look at the references and resources below.
    Enjoy!
    Simon, Rob & James

    • 58 min
    September 2020; papers of the month

    September 2020; papers of the month

    Welcome back!!
    So we've had a small summer hiatus and are now back with another Papers of The Month and a jam packed line up of episodes for the rest of the year!
    We start off this month with a paper which looks to evaluate if there is any benefit on mortality with the use of checklists for endotracheal intubation.
    Next up we take a look at the factors in cardiac arrest that are most important with regards to prognostication; what should your attention and handover be most focussed upon?
    Finally we take a look at a paper suggesting that blood gases following ROSC can help us prognosticate for our patient and how this might this affect our practice.
    Finally keep an eye out for our CPD portal and app which is in the final stages of testing and will be out very shortly!! We'll be keeping you up to date on twitter @TheResusRoom with its launch
    All references can be found on our webpage at TheResusRoom.co.uk
    Enjoy!
    Simon & Rob

    • 31 min
    August 2020; papers of the month

    August 2020; papers of the month

    So this is our last episode before a small summer hiatus, so it better be a good one!





    Journals are littered with some great articles at the moment, so we've chosen 3 great papers that cover a number of really important EM topics.





    Over the last few years more emphasis has been put on a more conservative management on pneumothoraces and following that trend we take a look at a paper evaluating the safety of using a small bore chest drain for the delayed management of haemothoraces, compared with large bore.



    Next up we take a look at the Injury Severity Score and how well it correlates with the need for life saving interventions in trauma.





    Lastly there is another great paper on the management of acute atrial fibrillation; comparing electrical cardioversion with the potential use of procainamide prior to shocking. Does it result in fewer patients requiring a shock, and when it comes to the shock is AP pad positioning more effective that anterolateral?





    We'll be taking a small break over the summer and will be back in September for our next Papers Podcast and keep an eye out for the launch of our FREE CPD app and web platform this summer.





    Enjoy!



     


    Simon & Rob

     






     

    • 33 min
    Ultrasound in Cardiac Arrest; Roadside to Resus

    Ultrasound in Cardiac Arrest; Roadside to Resus

    The more you delve into cardiac arrest, the more it seems that delivering the essentials well is the key to great outcomes; timely recognition, high quality chest compressions, with early and appropriate defibrillation.
    But is ultrasound in cardiac arrest a layer that we should all be adding in as a standard. It holds the potential to not only prognose outcomes from cardiac arrest, both medical and traumatic, but also to add a level of diagnosis of potentially reversible causes.
    In this podcast we chat through the evidence surrounding ultrasound in cardiac arrest and consider the practicalities of application during delivery of patient care.
    Make sure to take a look at the references and resources below.
    Enjoy!
    Simon, Rob & James

    • 52 min
    July 2020; papers of the month

    July 2020; papers of the month

    There are more great pieces of research to enjoy this month!
    We start off with a paper following on nicely from our Roadside to Resus episode on Stabbing, which looks at the ability of prehospital providers to predict whether stab injuries penetrate to deep structures, or are purely superficial from clinical assessment.
    Next up we take a look at a paper using high sensitivity troponin and their limit of detection, to assess whether we could be safely discharging patients earlier from the emergency department.
    Finally we have a look at the results from the RECOVERY group on dexamethasone use in COVID-19, have we got a treatment that can help improve survival in patients admitted with the virus?
    We'd love to hear any thought or comments you have either on the website or via twitter @TheResusRoom.
    Enjoy!
    Simon & Rob

    • 29 min
    TXA in GI Bleeds, HALT-IT; Roadside to Resus

    TXA in GI Bleeds, HALT-IT; Roadside to Resus

    Tranexamic Acid (TXA) has gained a significant amount of attention over the last few years as multiple studies have shown it's utility in decreasing haemorrhage and associated mortality. It has become part of major trauma guidelines, post part haemorrhage protocols and many have adopted it to the management of traumatic brain injury. The findings have been very similar across a spectrum of haemorrhage disease processes and from this further interest in expanding TXA's application to pretty much anything that bleeds. Time from onset of the bleeding has been shown to be important, with it's effect decreasing from time of onset to its administration.
    Gastro-intestinal bleeding is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Previous meta-analyses have shown favourable outcomes for TXA in GI bleeds and many have already adopted TXA into this area of practice, although guidance from NICE does not yet recommend it.
    HALT-IT is a multi centre, international, randomised double blind controlled trial of near 12,000 patients that has just been published in the Lancet. The study was a huge piece of work and looks to definitively answer the question of whether we should be giving TXA to patients with life threatening GI bleeds. In this podcast we run through the ins and outs of the paper ad are lucky enough to speak to the lead author Ian Roberts about the findings, some of the intricacies of the trial and what the results mean for practice.
    Enjoy!
    Simon, Rob & James
     

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Medicine

Listeners Also Subscribed To