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The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

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The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

    What next for Africa's richest woman?

    What next for Africa's richest woman?

    Isabel dos Santos faces charges in her native Angola. The daughter of the former long-time president is accused of corruption after a leak of documents. Ed Cropley, former Reuters sub-Saharan Africa bureau chief, discusses what could happen next. Mark Hays from the campaign group Global Witness explains why the role of international banks and accountants in the scandal shouldn't be a surprise. Tom Keatinge from the Royal United Services Institute, a think tank, argues that countries like the UK have made some progress in tackling money laundering.

    (Photo: Isabel dos Santos in 2018, Credit: Getty Images)

    • 17 min
    The products used again and again and again...

    The products used again and again and again...

    Why don't more manufacturers embrace the principles of the circular economy? It's a pertinent question, given the dire state of the recycling industry.

    Manuela Saragosa speaks to one company that has already implemented the principles of the circular economy. Cardboard box manufacturer DS Smith tracks its products throughout their life, and can reuse the fibres they contain up to 25 times, according to the firm's sustainability lead, Sam Jones.

    So why don't more manufacturers do the same? Manuela speaks to circular economy expert Alexandre Lemille, Jarkko Havas of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, and Josephine von Mitschke-Collande of EIT Climate-KIC in Switzerland.

    (Picture: Old plastic water bottle on a beach; Credit: s-c-s/Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    Mapping paradise

    Mapping paradise

    Katie Prescott revisits the efforts of the Zanzibar government to chart its territory by flying drones across the African spice island.

    A year ago she met planning minister Mohammed Juma, the brains behind this ambitious project that aims to clarify land property rights, provide information to local residents about the location of services and amenities, and help the government plan everything from flood management to urban redevelopment.

    Katie catches up with Edward Anderson of the World Bank, who headed up the drone mapping project, to find out how the data they have gathered is now being crunched by artificial intelligence algorithms, and being made available to the public.

    Producer: Sarah Treanor

    (Picture: Aerial view of Zanzibar beach; Credit: den-belitsky/Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    Cities at a standstill

    Cities at a standstill

    How strikes and protests affect the economies of major cities. Will Bain visits Paris to see how strikes on the transport network are affecting local businesses, while Ed Butler speaks to author and former Hong Kong civil servant Rachel Cartland about the economic impact of anti-China protests in the region.

    (Photo: Protests against the policies of French president Emmanuel Macron in Paris in January, Credit: Getty Images)

    • 17 min
    Being watched at work

    Being watched at work

    The monitoring of employees in the workplace is becoming commonplace. Ed Butler speaks to Sean Petterson, boss of StrongArm Technologies, a company that monitors construction and warehouse workers to reduce workplace accidents. Griff Ferris from the anti-surveillance campaign group Big Brother Watch explains why workplace monitoring could be imposed without employees' consent. Brian Kropp from the advisory firm Gartner questions the value of all the data being generated by monitoring technology.

    (Photo credit: Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    Insomnia and the smartphone

    Insomnia and the smartphone

    Modern tech is accused of interfering with our sleep, keeping us up late anxiously staring at our phone screens. But could a phone app provide the cure?

    Roughly one in three people in most developed countries typically tell surveys that the suffer from insomnia. The BBC's Laurence Knight is one of them. He seeks the advice of sleep physician Dr Guy Leschziner of Guy's Hospital in London, who explains how sleep and anxiety can become a vicious circle.

    The good news is that there is a new non-drug treatment that is proving remarkably successful - cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia. The bad news is that there are nowhere near enough trained clinicians able to provide treatment. That provides a gap in the market - and one that Yuri Maricich of US medical tech firm Pear Therapeutics hopes to fill with a mobile phone app of all things.

    (Picture: Cell phone addict man awake at night in bed using smartphone; Credit: OcusFocus/Getty Images)

    • 18 min

Avis d’utilisateurs

It68 ,

Excellent!

Thanks a lot to the BBC.

Hwshjbdi ,

Enablers of animal oppression

That’s for all the anti vegan crap and for supporting factory farming and taking their money to spread biased non scientific misinformation. BBC a propaganda machine for the rich exploitative industries.

bottledgenius ,

taxing the rich

The idea/subtext behind “taxes” is in general: punishment. Resisting, evasion and corruption is the narrow minded reaction; ordinary logic, as if assets and money could be withdrawn from society for eternity. But it is like the earth, which is nobody’s. All gouvernements should offer rich people a list with constructive projects for everybody, to choose from, and respectfully invite them to participate. Let’s refuse to feed the ever refining process of see, hear, fear and penalize. But think good chances.

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