18 épisodes

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

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    • Sciences
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The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

    19/01/22 - River pollution, Moy Park and Brixham fish market

    19/01/22 - River pollution, Moy Park and Brixham fish market

    The Farming Minister tells us DEFRA is working on a "nutrient calculator" which could help prevent further water pollution from farms and new housing developments.

    We visit the River Wye, where farmers supplying the chicken company Avara Foods are taking steps to reduce phosphate run off. It comes after campaigners blaming the pollution of the Wye on the increase in poultry units in the catchment.

    And, last year was a record-breaker for Brixham fish market, with more than 43 million pounds worth of fish coming through. But all is not quite what it seems.

    Presented by Anna Hill
    Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

    • 13 min
    18/01/22 - Dairy bull calves, preventing slurry run off and potato scab

    18/01/22 - Dairy bull calves, preventing slurry run off and potato scab

    Around 60,000 newborn male dairy calves are killed each year on farms in Great Britain - according to the AHDB. That’s about 4% of all the calves born to dairy cows - the rest are raised for meat. The industry has made a commitment to stop killing male calves by the end of this year…and the industry group, Ruminant Health and Welfare, says the use of sexed semen will be key. It means, some cows can be inseminated with sexed semen from a specialist dairy bull - to produce only female calves which will then join the dairy herd. Other cows can be inseminated with semen from a beef type bull - and the resulting cross breed calves are worth more on the beef market than a pure dairy bull calf.

    Manure or slurry is a significant pollutant, especially if it gets into waterways. Wessex Water is working with farmers to reduce the amount of phosphates in the Brinkworth Brook - a tributary of the Bristol Avon. We visit one of the 60 farms taking part.

    And, retailers won’t accept potatoes with scab - a disease that makes them look blistered, although they're still fine to eat. No chemicals will prevent scab, but scientists at the John Innes Centre in Norwich have been testing hundreds of strains of Pseudomonas bacteria, found naturally in the soil, that protect potatoes against this disease. They are now working on developing a soil bio-addition full of the best protective bacteria, to prevent scab from happening.

    Presented by Anna Hill
    Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

    • 13 min
    17/01/2022 Pig farmers in crisis, but production is up; farm pollution

    17/01/2022 Pig farmers in crisis, but production is up; farm pollution

    UK pork production is up: new government figures for last year show a 4% increase on production in 2020, to just over a million tonnes. Regular listeners who have heard pig farmers on this programme talk about how shortages of staff in abattoirs have forced them to kill pigs on farm, pigs which then can’t go into the food chain, may wonder how an industry in crisis can have a record year - it's the highest production level since 1999. We ask how a how a year of backlogs on farms fits with record production levels.

    All this week we're looking at pollution from farming, both causes and solutions. Today we hear from Professor Penny Johnes from Bristol University who studies the impact of food production on rivers and the sea.

    Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

    • 11 min
    15/01/2022 - Farming Today This Week: the Landscapes Review, river pollution and shellfish

    15/01/2022 - Farming Today This Week: the Landscapes Review, river pollution and shellfish

    The Government has published its response to the Glover review of protected landscapes: National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The government plans to strengthen AONBs - by renaming them National Landscapes - encourage more collaboration between national parks and says protected landscapes must do more to drive the recovery of nature.

    A report published this week found rivers in England are "in a mess", with not a single one given a clean bill of health. The Environmental Audit Committee found 36% of water bodies were impacted by sewage or wastewater and 40% were affected agricultural pollution, with intensive livestock and poultry farms causing particular issues.

    And, we look at the various challenges being faced by the UK shellfish industry; from increase paperwork to climate change.

    Presented by Charlotte Smith
    Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

    • 25 min
    14/01/2022 High fertiliser prices, Dame Ellen MacArthur, cockles

    14/01/2022 High fertiliser prices, Dame Ellen MacArthur, cockles

    Farmers are warning that fertiliser prices are now so high, some fields will simply not be planted this year. Prices are currently four times what they were last January. It's due to the high cost of gas which has seen fertiliser plants in the UK and across Europe suspend production.

    We hear from Dame Ellen MacArthur on how farming could benefit from a circular economy.

    And all this week we’re looking at shellfish. Today the focus is on cockles. We visit the Gower Estuary in Swansea where cockle pickers have worked for hundreds of years.

    Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

    • 13 min
    13/01/22 - River pollution, shellfish bacteria and mussel farming

    13/01/22 - River pollution, shellfish bacteria and mussel farming

    Rivers in England are in a mess - so say MPs on the Environmental Audit Committee. Their report into water quality in rivers is published today and doesn’t make cheerful reading particularly for water companies - which are blamed for 36% of pollution and farming which is the cause of 40% with intensive livestock and poultry farms causing particular issues. The Committee recommends that in places where a river is badly affected by pollution new poultry units shouldn’t be allowed.

    The future may be complicated for the UK’s shellfish producers - new research shows that rising temperatures are causing a growing diversity of bacteria in our seas. The study from the University of Exeter found bacteria that could kill shellfish, as has happened in France and Australia.

    Presented by Charlotte Smith
    Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

    • 13 min

Avis

4,2 sur 5
10 notes

10 notes

Assa 17 ,

Very interesting

Even if you're not a farmer yourself and don't live in the UK, you can learn a lot about farming and countryside. Thank you. Agnès from France

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