149 épisodes

React Native Radio Podcast

React Native Radio DevChat.tv

    • Technologies

React Native Radio Podcast

    RNR 151: JavaScript Language Features

    RNR 151: JavaScript Language Features

    In this episode of React Native Radio the panel discusses JavaScript Language Features. They discuss their uses, which ones they prefer and how they shape the language. Josh Justice starts the discussion with Babel, a transpiling tool. They explain what it is and invite listeners to donate to the project. Josh also explains what ECMAScript is.


     


    Next, they discuss arrow functions, explaining what they are used for. Arrow functions clean up code and encourage clean programming. They also help with “this” keyword binding. The panel discusses the class keyword, and how it made its way into JavaScript. They discuss class features, class properties, and private fields. 


     


    Though it is a bit of a controversial topic right now the panel discusses the keywords for declaring a variable, var, let, and const. They share thoughts on the controversy and their preferences. ESLint and Prettier are recommended. They compare promise and async-await. Jamon Holmgren shares his experiences from the time before promise and async-await. 


     


    The panel discusses destructuring and shares experiences from their own work. They discuss property value shorthand, a feature they use every day. Rest and spread are considered. Jamon brings up string literals, proxies, and decorators. They end by discussing the value of learning new languages.


    Panelists



    Josh Justice



    Jamon Holmgren




    Sponsors



    G2i 



    Infinite Red



    CacheFly




    ____________________________________________________________

    "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today!


    ____________________________________________________________

    Links



    https://github.com/tonsky/FiraCode 



    https://dank.sh/ 



    JS Private Fields and OO Design 



    On let vs const 



    Promises for asynchronous programming 



    Feature watch: ECMAScript 2020 



    Gluegun 



    Property value shorthands 



    https://www.facebook.com/ReactNativeRadio/



    https://twitter.com/R_N_Radio




    Picks

    Josh Justice:




    Donate to Babel 



    https://overreacted.io/




    Jamon Holmgren:




    https://academy.infinite.red/


    Beginning Machine Learning with TensorFlow.js

    • 1h 7 min
    RNR 150: React Native Pros and Cons

    RNR 150: React Native Pros and Cons

    In this episode of React Native Radio the panel walks through an article written by Net Guru outlining the pros and cons of React Native. The first pro the panel discusses is that is React Native is faster to build. The panel shares their experience with building with React Native. They agree that React Native is fast unless unique customization is necessary; this leads them to discuss one of the cons of React Native, the lack of some custom modules. 


     


    The next pro they discuss is the fact that this one framework can work across multiple platforms. While they agree React Native is not perfect, it does do a good job sharing code and other things across platforms. This saves on cost and time. Another pro they discuss is hot reloading, which included over the air updates and fast refresh. 


     


    Smaller teams are both pros and cons according to the panel. Smaller teams are possible because everyone works together, there is no longer a need for an iOS team and an Android team. The panel does point out specialists in those platforms may still be needed to work out any kinks in the different platforms. They explain how whether smaller teams are a pro or a con is based on the case. 


     


    They discuss the controversy of how fast React Native is. It is faster than some frameworks and slower than others. The panel discusses their experience with React Native speed, performance, and how they are measured. Simplified UI is the last pro on the list. 


     


    The cons they overview once more, though they do discuss them in how they relate to the pros. The first con the panel discusses is less smooth navigation. The panel believes that the navigation works great unless you create something custom or irregular. The other cons are the lack of custom modules and the need for Native developers. They end by discusses the alternative frameworks to React Native and their experience with them. 


    Panelists



    Josh Justice



    Charles Max Wood



    Christopher Reyes




    Sponsors



    G2i 



    Infinite Red



    CacheFly




    ____________________________________________________________

    "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today!


    ____________________________________________________________

    Links



    React Native Pros and Cons 



    RN Platform module 



    RN Device Info 



    RN 0.61 with Fast Refresh 



    RNR 145 Five Approaches to RN 



    Ash Furrow, The Case for React Native 



    https://www.facebook.com/ReactNativeRadio/



    https://twitter.com/R_N_Radio




    Picks

    Charles Max Wood:




    https://kanbanflow.com/



    https://tomato-timer.com/




    Josh Justice:




    It Doesn’t Have to Be Crazy At Work




    Christopher Reyes:




    https://www.letgo.com/en-us



    https://offerup.com/

    • 55 min
    RNR 149: React Native Radio Still at RxJS Live

    RNR 149: React Native Radio Still at RxJS Live

    In this episode of React Native Radio Charles Max Wood continues interviewing speakers at RxJS Live. First, he interviews Mike Ryan and Sam Julien. They gave a talk about Groupby, a little known operator. They overview the common problems other mapping operators have and how Groupby addresses these problems. The discuss with Charles where these types of operators are most commonly used and use an analogy to explain the different mapping operators. 


     


    Next, Charles talks to Tracy Lee. Her talk defines and explains the top twenty operators people should use. In her talk, she shows real-world use cases and warns against gotchas. Tracy and Charles explain that you don’t need to know all 60 operators, most people only need about 5-10 to function. She advises people to know the difference between the different types of operators. Tracy ends her interview by explaining her desire to inspire women and people of minority groups. She and Charles share their passion for diversity and giving everyone the chance to do what they love.


     


    Dean Radcliffe speaks with Charles next and discusses his talk about making React Forms reactive. They discuss binding observables in React and how Dean used this in his business. He shares how he got inspired for this talk and how he uses RxJS in his everyday work.  


     


    The final interview is with Joe Eames, CEO of Thinkster. Joe spoke about error handling. He explains how he struggled with this as did many others so he did a deep dive to find answers to share. In his talk, he covers what error handling is and what it is used for. Joe outlines where most people get lost when it comes to error handling. He also shares the three strategies used in error handling, Retry, Catch and Rethrow and, Catch and Replace. Charles shares his admiration for the Thinkster teaching approach. Joe explains what Thinkster is about and what makes them special. He also talks about The DevEd podcast. 


    Panelists



    Charles Max Wood




    Guests



    Mike Ryan 



    Sam Julien



    Tracy Lee



    Dean Radcliffe



    Joe Eames




    Sponsors



    Infinite Red



    G2i



    CacheFly




    ____________________________________________________________

    "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today!


    ____________________________________________________________

     


    Links



    https://www.rxjs.live/



    RxJS Live Youtube Channel



    https://twitter.com/mikeryandev



    https://twitter.com/samjulien



    https://twitter.com/ladyleet?



    https://www.npmjs.com/package/rx-helper



    https://twitter.com/deaniusol



    https://twitter.com/josepheames



    https://devchat.tv/dev-ed/



    https://www.facebook.com/ReactNativeRadio/



    https://twitter.com/R_N_Radio




     

    • 39 min
    RNR 148: What's in My Stack?

    RNR 148: What's in My Stack?

    In this episode of React Native Radio the panel overviews the libraries and tools they choose for their stack and explain why they choose them. Christopher Reyes starts by discussing his favorite notes app, Bear Notes. He shares the features from the app that makes him love it so much. The panel also discusses Notion as a good resource for organizing teams. 


     


    Next, Chris outlines the stack he would recommend for someone new to development and React Native.  He recommends React Native CLI, React Native Navigation, Native Base, and Async Storage. Chris explains why he recommends these tools.


     


     The panel also discusses the importance of going back to your source to make sure you are using the most up to date product. The panel considers what version five of React Navigation with the component-based API will change in their everyday work. They all express their excitement to try it. 


     


    Jamon Holmgren is the next panelist to outline his stack. He builds with Ignite and uses the stack that it provides. Jamon explains how Ignite works and what it has in its stack. He likes React Navigation, MobX and, React Native Screens. Jamon goes over the pros and cons of a Native navigation stack compared to a JavaScript one. He also explains why he prefers MobX and goes over the differences over their various tools. He also discusses the boilerplates built by Infinite Red and what to expect in their upcoming boilerplates. 


     


    Next, Charles Max Wood shares his troubles with his current DevchatTV app and the panel tries to help. Josh Justice is the last to overview his stack, he discusses one of his hobby apps, building a todo app. He is using Orbitjs, ESLint, Prettier, React Native Elements, and React Native Paper. Josh emphasizes the need to test even in hobby projects, for that he uses Dependabot, React Native testing library, and Detox. 


    Panelists



    Josh Justice



    Charles Max Wood



    Christopher Reyes



    Jamon Holmgren




    Sponsors



    Infinite Red



    G2i



    CacheFly




    Links



    Bear Notes 



    Notion 



    NativeBase 



    AsyncStorage 



    React Native CLI 



    React Navigation 



    React Navigation v5 preview 



    Ignite



    React Native screens 



    MobX State Tree 



    React Native EU 2019: Jamon Holmgren 



    MobX 



    Jamon Holmgren - Build an iOS and Android app in 15 minutes using React Native 



    Orbit JS 



    nativeup 



    Dependabot 



    Material UI guidelines 



    iOS Human Interface Guidelines 



    Appium 



    https://www.facebook.com/ReactNativeRadio/



    https://twitter.com/R_N_Radio




    Picks

    Charles Max Wood:




    The MaxCoders Guide To Finding Your Dream Developer Job



    Buy DevchatTV a coffee




    Josh Justice:




    Editor Snippets




    Christopher Reyes:




    MacBook Pro Web Developer Setup — From clean slate to dev machine 




    Jamon Holmgren:




    Software Libraries Are Terrifying 

    • 1h 3 min
    RNR 147: Libraries vs Omakase

    RNR 147: Libraries vs Omakase

    In this episode of React Native Radio the panel discusses the different approaches frameworks have for building stack. The panel takes a moment to define the two major approaches, libraries and batteries included. They list various frameworks and discuss where they lie on the scale of libraries to omakase. 


     


    Frameworks like React and React Native are the panels examples of a libraries approach framework. Developers pick and choose libraries to build their stack, React is basically just a UI library. They use Ruby on Rails as the example of an omakase approach; about 80% of the stack is chosen for you. 


     


    The pros and cons of each approach are considered. The panel shares their experiences picking libraries for their React and React Native apps and describe some of the challenges. Along with the freedom and flexibility given to the developer with a libraries approach, there is also the stress of keeping up with the latest libraries and tools. The beauty of this approach is the diversity and decentralization. 


     


    The omakase approach relieves the stress of keeping up with the latest libraries because it chooses them for you. There is safety in numbers, meaning the libraries chosen by omakase frameworks will always be supported. Also, substitutions are still possible. This approach can also be helpful for beginners, giving them training wheels and room to learn without too much responsibility. 


     


    The panel discusses when each approach is helpful. They share their experiences with each approach and with frameworks that lie somewhere on that spectrum. The panel shares their preferences. The needs for conventions and standards are considered. The panel shares options for an omakase approach for React. 


     


    Panelists



    Charles Max Wood






    Josh Justice



    Christopher Reyes




    Sponsors



    Infinite Red



    G2i



    CacheFly




    Links



    Ignite 



    Rails Doctrine 



    Ember.js 



    https://nativebase.io/kitchen-sink-app 



    https://www.facebook.com/ReactNativeRadio/



    https://twitter.com/R_N_Radio




    Picks

    Josh Justice:




    Frozen II



    redux-thunk




    Christopher Reyes:




    JSJ 246 GraphQL and Apollo with Uri Goldshtein



    Artsy Omakase




    Charles Max Wood:




    The Bishop's Wife



    Miracle on 34th Street



    How the Grinch Stole Christmas

    • 40 min
    RNR 146: React Native Radio at RxJS Live

    RNR 146: React Native Radio at RxJS Live

    In this episode of React Native Radio Charles Max Wood does interviews at RxJS Live. His first interview is with Ben Lesh, a core team member of RxJS. Ben has been working on RxJS for the last four years. In his talk, he shares the future of RxJs, the timeline for versions 7 and 8. With Charles, he discusses his work on RxJS and the adoption of RxJS. 


     


    Next, Charles interviews Sam Julien and Kim Maida. They gave a talk together covering the common problems developers have when learning RxJS. In the talk, they share tips for those learning RxJS. Charles wonders what inspired them to give this talk. Both share experiences where they encouraged someone to use RxJS but the learning curve was to steep. They discuss the future of RxJS adoptions and resources. 


     


    Finally, Charles interviews Kim alone about her second talk about RxJS and state management. She explains to Charles that many state management libraries are built on RxJS and that it is possible to roll out your own state management solution with RxJS. They discuss why there are so many different state management libraries. Kim shares advice for those looking to roll out their own solutions. 


    Panelists



    Charles Max Wood




    Guests



    Ben Lesch



    Sam Julien



    Kim Maida




    Sponsors



    Infinite Red



    G2i



    CacheFly




    Links



    https://twitter.com/benlesh



    http://www.samjulien.com/



    https://twitter.com/samjulien



    https://twitter.com/KimMaida



    https://www.rxjs.live/



    https://www.facebook.com/ReactNativeRadio/



    https://twitter.com/R_N_Radio

    • 28 min

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