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Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

The Intelligence The Economist

    • Actualités

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

    Clerical era: Iran’s elections

    Clerical era: Iran’s elections

    In a bid to unite a fractious populace, hardliners barred half of the parliamentary candidates; by silencing moderates, the plan will suppress turnout and deepen the disquiet. We take a look at the rise, fall and this week’s pardon of the “junk-bond king” Michael Milken. And why so few Japanese people use their widely welcomed passports.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 21 min
    Uncut emerald: Ireland’s unification prospects

    Uncut emerald: Ireland’s unification prospects

    Spurred on by demographic shifts, Brexit and the success of the Sinn Fein party in this month’s election, the once-unthinkable idea of Irish reunification is gaining ground. The IMF is in Lebanon to discuss restructuring the country’s crippling debts; we examine the roots of the economic crisis. And visiting a frigid festival where even the instruments are made from ice.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 22 min
    Many hands light of work: China’s 170m migrant workers

    Many hands light of work: China’s 170m migrant workers

    Strict controls meant to contain the spread of the coronavirus are affecting many of the country’s villages. Our correspondent visits migrant workers who are trapped and draining their savings. We look into why Boeing’s space-and-defence division, which used to prop up the commercial-aircraft side, is itself losing altitude. And why American politicians’ heights matter so much to their prospects.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 22 min
    A friend of mines: America’s explosive policy turn

    A friend of mines: America’s explosive policy turn

    The Trump administration’s stance on anti-personnel landmines worries many—but also speaks to a future in which the rules of war are uncertain. Britain’s universities are coming to grips with how much the slave trade built them. And why the ads on televised sport aren’t always what they seem.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 22 min
    The snails of justice: the International Criminal Court

    The snails of justice: the International Criminal Court

    Sudan’s transitional government has pledged to hand over the country’s brutal former leader to the ICC—could justice for the court’s most-wanted man at last give it credibility? Even with a world-beating renewables push, Norway’s wealth depends on oil; how can it navigate the shifting economics of energy? And the bid to make Los Angeles just a bit less car-dependent.  
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 20 min
    Another man’s Treasury: Britain’s cabinet upheaval

    Another man’s Treasury: Britain’s cabinet upheaval

    The dramatic departure of the head of the Treasury reveals Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s desire—and that of his wily chief aide—to take firm hold of the country’s purse strings. A new book finds that a landmark study in psychiatry was not at all what it seemed. And the thumping changes going on in Berlin’s club scene. 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer
    Additional audio “Dustbin Acid (Super Rhythm Trax)” courtesy Jerome Hill For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 23 min

Avis d’utilisateurs

benjamin Haas ,

Great to listen to background news

Not just good journalism but also well presented. With music, cliff hangers and good timing. Pity of the very british accents. But then these accents makes it a bit more interesting. Well done Jason and Team. And congratulations on your 200th issue
Jason missed you during your holiday. I understand it is a big responsibility and tiring to do this every week day. But i never notice. Even if all is scripted the dialogues sound real.

gypsy858 ,

The intelligence

Congratulations on your 100th podcast and for an excellent, informative discussion both of burning issues and the ones we might have missed

The Behaviorist ,

5 stars!

Great content in a very friendly format would highly recommend!

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