58 episodes

Nick Tomalin snd Simon Whiteside host a variety of podcasts about jazz .From the short vignettes of two pianist, five minutes, one podcast through to the Two pianist, Five Podcasts, One subject and in depth look at the life work and piano stylings of single pianists. So far Sonny Clark and Kenny Drew have been covered.

2-5-1 Simon Whiteside and Nicholas Tomalin

    • Arts
    • 4.8 • 4 Ratings

Nick Tomalin snd Simon Whiteside host a variety of podcasts about jazz .From the short vignettes of two pianist, five minutes, one podcast through to the Two pianist, Five Podcasts, One subject and in depth look at the life work and piano stylings of single pianists. So far Sonny Clark and Kenny Drew have been covered.

    2-5m-1-S1E42-Andre Previn

    2-5m-1-S1E42-Andre Previn

    Andre Previn had a long career  Simon and Nick discuss his life and his work in the jazz, Film and Classical Music. 

    • 5 min
    2-5m-1-S1E41-Monk Biography

    2-5m-1-S1E41-Monk Biography

    Nick and Simon discuss the biography Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original.  Author Robin D. Kelley grew up in Harlem in a house where modern jazz was the soundtrack to family life.His PhD was on Social Movements but through a series of posts at top american universities he moved more towards writing about music...

    • 5 min
    2-5m-1-S1E40-San Francisco Jazz

    2-5m-1-S1E40-San Francisco Jazz

    The Fillmore district of San Francisco was known as " The Harlem of the West" in the 1940s and there were many clubs that flourished there for a decade or more.  Live recordings of top artists bear the names of some of them. There are currently several jazz clubs and a specialised Jazz Centre in San Fransisco so  in the words of Frank Zappa,  in Fog City " jazz isn't dead it just smells funny"

    • 5 min
    2-5m-1-S1E39- Hear me Talkin' to Ya

    2-5m-1-S1E39- Hear me Talkin' to Ya

    Nick and Simon discuss the  well known book of jazz interviews  'Hear  me Talkin' to Ya The Story of Jazz as Told by the Men Who Made It.'

    • 5 min
    2-5m-1-S1E38-Red Garland Block Chords

    2-5m-1-S1E38-Red Garland Block Chords

    Red Garland was one of the big beasts of the 1950s New York jazz scene recording  many albums as leader with  his  trio, he was also part of the first great Miles Davis quartet and with Paul Chambers and Philly Joe Jones  they collectively became known as " The Rhythm Section"

    In this episode Nick and Simon discuss and demonstrate Red Garlands pugilistic block chord playing style 

    • 5 min
    2-5m-1-S1E37-Blue Notes in B&W

    2-5m-1-S1E37-Blue Notes in B&W

    Simon and Nick discuss the book Blue Notes in Black and White a book about the relationship between jazz image and jazz music.  Below is the blurb from the book:

    You can read and excerpt here

    Miles Davis, supremely cool behind his shades. Billie Holiday, eyes closed and head tilted back in full cry. John Coltrane, one hand behind his neck and a finger held pensively to his lips. These iconic images have captivated jazz fans nearly as much as the music has. Jazz photographs are visual landmarks in American history, acting as both a reflection and a vital part of African American culture in a time of immense upheaval, conflict, and celebration. Charting the development of jazz photography from the swing era of the 1930s to the rise of black nationalism in the ’60s, Blue Notes in Black and White is the first of its kind: a fascinating account of the partnership between two of the twentieth century’s most innovative art forms. Benjamin Cawthra introduces us to the great jazz photographers—including Gjon Mili, William Gottlieb, Herman Leonard, Francis Wolff, Roy DeCarava, and William Claxton—and their struggles, hustles, styles, and creative visions. We also meet their legendary subjects, such as Duke Ellington, sweating through a late-night jam session for the troops during World War II, and Dizzy Gillespie, stylish in beret, glasses, and goatee. Cawthra shows us the connections between the photographers, art directors, editors, and record producers who crafted a look for jazz that would sell magazines and albums. And on the other side of the lens, he explores how the musicians shaped their public images to further their own financial and political goals. This mixture of art, commerce, and racial politics resulted in a rich visual legacy that is vividly on display in Blue Notes in Black and White. Beyond illuminating the aesthetic power of these images, Cawthra ultimately shows how jazz and its imagery served a crucial function in the struggle for civil rights, making African Americans proudly, powerfully visible.

    • 5 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

Lc4p ,

These two know what they are talking about

I found this series very informative.

JazzPianist43 ,

This is interesting

Although this is about jazz, I found it interesting. (Who likes jazz?).