57 episodes

Busy Being Black with Josh Rivers is the podcast exploring how we live in the fullness of our queer Black lives.

Busy Being Black W!ZARD Studios

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.0, 83 Ratings

Busy Being Black with Josh Rivers is the podcast exploring how we live in the fullness of our queer Black lives.

    BL Shirelle: Assata Troi

    BL Shirelle: Assata Troi

    BL Shirelle is a hip-hop artist and activist who uses her music to share her experiences with police violence, addiction and the realities of prison for Black women. Her debut album, Assata Troi – which translates to “she who struggles is a warrior” – is described as a timeless hip hop classic that speaks of hope in our era of mass incarceration and systemic racism. In addition to her own music, BL is the Deputy Director of Die Jim Crow Records – the first record label in the United States for formerly and currently incarcerated musicians. We explore how 20 years in and out of prison has shaped her identity and informed her activism, and the lessons she’s learned from her elders within the prison system, who helped inspire and nurture her throughout her adolescence.
    ---Busy Being Black is the podcast exploring how we live in the fullness of our queer Black lives. If you like what you hear, please take a moment to rate, review and subscribe; doing so lets others like us hear the voices amplified here.
    ---Thank you to our partners, UK Black Pride, BlackOut UK and Schools Out.

    • 53 min
    Lama Rod Owens: Bad Buddhist

    Lama Rod Owens: Bad Buddhist

    A self-titled bad Buddhist, Lama Rod Owens is an author, activist and authorised Lama (Buddhist Teacher) in the Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism. He's a comforting, honest and straight-talking queer Black man, who’s considered one of the leaders of his generation of Buddhist teachers. His new book is Love and Rage: The Path to Liberation through Anger – and he opens the first chapter like this: “Since the 2016 presidential election, shit has been hard for some of us. For the rest of us, shit has been hard for a while.” From his rearing in the Black Church to his self-discovery through Buddhism, our conversation is one of deep reflection and a frank exploration of the ways in which our unaddressed anger prevents us from not only a psychic and physical liberation, but from connecting meaningfully to ourselves and to others in every imaginable part of our lives.
    ---Busy Being Black is the podcast exploring how we live in the fullness of our queer Black lives. If you like what you hear, please take a moment to rate, review and subscribe; doing so lets others like us hear the voices amplified here.
    ---Thank you to our partners, UK Black Pride, BlackOut UK and Schools Out.

    • 57 min
    Theory in the Flesh with Dr Oni Blackstock

    Theory in the Flesh with Dr Oni Blackstock

    For the sixth and final episode of Theory in the Flesh, I’m in conversation with Dr Oni Blackstock, the Assistant Commissioner for the Bureau of HIV at the New York City Department of Health. In 2018, doctors diagnosed 1,917 people with HIV – a 67% decline from the number of diagnoses in 2001.
    ---I reached out to Dr Blackstock to understand what precipitated such a historic drop in new HIV diagnoses in New York City and how she and her colleagues at the Bureau of HIV have been able to intervene so successfully in the lives of those disproportionately impacted by HIV. We discuss the years-long work of building trust among marginalised communities, the many ways the city addresses and accounts for structural inequalities and disparities in HIV outreach, and the parallels between Covid-19 and the ongoing HIV epidemic. Dr Blackstock makes clear that it takes large teams working at the city level, substantive funding at all levels of government and consistent engagement with and funding of grassroots and community organisations to deliver health interventions that work for all.
    ---Busy Being Black is the podcast exploring how we live in the fullness of our queer Black lives and Theory in the Flesh is made possible with funding from the British Podcast Awards fund and Wellcome Trust. Please show your support for Busy Being Black, by taking a few minutes to share your feedback at podcastviews.com.
    ---Thank you to our partners, UK Black Pride, BlackOut UK and Schools Out.

    • 47 min
    Theory in the Flesh with Bakita Kasadha

    Theory in the Flesh with Bakita Kasadha

    Bakita Kasadha is a writer, researcher and poet. She is a Black woman living with HIV and as a health activist holds different national and international advisory roles. Her recently completed dissertation critiques and challenges knowledge production at the research level, and asks important questions about who is and is not involved in research that aims to uplift and support at-risk and marginalised communities.
    ---We explore the problematising of Blackness, the laziness of those who call Black and other marginalised communities hard to reach and how top-down approaches to health research, that do not contextualise lived experiences, limit the success of interventions and can even cost lives. She believes health researchers, medical practitioners and funding bodies should be ethically engaging communities in the shaping, delivery and involvement of healthcare initiatives.
    ---We open with Bakita’s reading of her poem, Numbers Game.
    ---Busy Being Black is the podcast exploring how we live in the fullness of our queer Black lives and Theory in the Flesh is made possible with funding from the British Podcast Awards fund and Wellcome Trust. Please show your support for Busy Being Black, by taking a few minutes to share your feedback at podcastviews.com.
    ---Thank you to our partners, UK Black Pride, BlackOut UK and Schools Out.

    • 57 min
    Theory in the Flesh with Charity So White

    Theory in the Flesh with Charity So White

    In a powerhouse TedTalk, The Problem with Race-based Medicine, social justice advocate and law scholar Dorothy E Roberts says: “Race is not a biological category that naturally produces health disparities because of genetic difference. Race is a social category that has staggering biological consequences, but because of the impact of social inequality on people's health.”
    The novel coronavirus, COVID19, is not racist. It is a highly contagious virus that moves with ease from person-to-person and which takes advantage of compromised immune systems. COVID19 is hitting Black and Minority Ethnic communities the hardest because of racism. As long as medical institutions, scientists, researchers and the public continue to ignore the institutionalised, structural and everyday racism that makes us vulnerable to ill health in the first place, our communities will continue to be disproportionately impacted - as we have been historically - time and time again.
    Today, I’m in conversation with Camille St. Omer and Martha Awojobi, two of the ten team members leading Charity So White. The organisation was founded in 2019 to call attention to the racism in the charity sector and to provide a pathway to a sector representative of the vulnerable and at-risk communities it exists to serve and support. Charity So White has issued a live position paper, which is being updated every week, that offers not only crucial insight into the disproportionate impact of COVID19 on Black and Minority Ethnic communities, but practical and important suggestions for the necessary way forward. Camille and Martha remind us that in the midst of a crisis, we have an opportunity to redress the systemic injustices that continue to leave so many of our people behind.
    ---Busy Being Black is the podcast exploring how we live in the fullness of our queer Black lives and Theory in the Flesh is made possible with funding from the British Podcast Awards fund and Wellcome Trust. Please show your support for Busy Being Black, by taking a few minutes to share your feedback at podcastviews.com.
    ---Thank you to our partners, UK Black Pride, BlackOut UK and Schools Out.

    • 49 min
    Theory in the Flesh with Ben Hurst

    Theory in the Flesh with Ben Hurst

    In countries like England, where young Black boys - irregardless of sexuality - are disproportionately impacted by school exclusions, where the prison population is full of Black men and where mental health services for Black people are increasingly rare, how are we as queer Black people and queer people of colour acknowledging and showing solidarity with our presumably heterosexual Black brothers?
    Cathy J. Cohen’s seminal essay “Punks, Bulldaggers and Welfare Queens” cautions us against a queer politics that does not include those whose sexuality may be different to ours. She writes, “My concern is centred on those individuals who consistently activate only one characteristic of their identity, or a single perspective of consciousness, to organise their politics, rejecting any recognition of the multiple and intersecting systems of power that largely dictate our life chances.”
    And so my conversation today is with Ben Hurst, who is doing transformative work with men and boys around the country, helping them understand feminism, intersectionality and masculinity. We discuss our friendship as an example of coalition-building across sexual identities, embracing emotional literacy as Black men, and the patience and understanding required to show men and boys a different, positive version of masculinity.
    --
    Ben Hurst is the Head of Facilitation and Training at the Good Lad Initiative, an organisation teaching young men and boys about gender equality, feminism and intersectionality.
    --
    @_busybeingblack is the podcast exploring how we live in the fullness of our queer Black lives. Theory in the Flesh is made possible with funding from the British Podcast Awards Fund and Wellcome Trust. Find out more at: busybeingblack.com.
    --
    Thank you to our partners, UK Black Pride, BlackOut UK and Schools Out.

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5
83 Ratings

83 Ratings

@black_history_buff_777 ,

Wonderful stories, listen and enjoy

It’s so great to hear black voices sharing their stories. Listen, learn and love black stories. Great job keep it up

Wilesy Stylesy ,

He looks more white than black

Being mostly white

hedgehogs0987321 ,

Love it!

Thank you for sharing these beautiful and honest conversations.

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by W!ZARD Studios