17 episodes

A weekly podcast examining the issues at the heart of our changing climate. We'll talk to scientists and policymakers and we'll highlight how small changes can make a big difference as we look for solutions to the problems caused by climate change.

ClimateCast Sky News

    • News
    • 4.6 • 38 Ratings

A weekly podcast examining the issues at the heart of our changing climate. We'll talk to scientists and policymakers and we'll highlight how small changes can make a big difference as we look for solutions to the problems caused by climate change.

    Too hot to handle - but we must get a grip

    Too hot to handle - but we must get a grip

    Cooling down our climate is no easy feat, but it's a necessary one for the billions of people who face ever more frequent and furious heatwaves due to climate change. It's estimated that by 2050, the energy demand from air conditioners will triple, and an air conditioning unit will be sold every single second.

    But a higher demand for AC equals a higher production of greenhouse gases - causing even more heatwaves. So how do we break the vicious cycle and find a happy medium?

    On this episode of Sky News ClimateCast, hosts Anna Jones and Katerina Vittozzi come armed with their fans, summer clothes and sweat bands as they explore how we can adapt to a warming climate.

    They speak to science correspondent Thomas Moore about the dangers of extreme heat as well as a Canadian resident from the town of Lytonn, whose entire village was destroyed by wildfire.

    Plus Dr. Radikha Khosla –a researcher working on cooling solutions, answers the question on all of our minds: how can we cool down, as the planet heats up?

    Hosts: Anna Jones and Katerina Vittozzi
    Guests: Edith Loring-Kuhanga, Dr. Radikha Khosla, Thomas Moore
    Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse
    Interviews producer: Tatiana Alderson

    • 26 min
    The feminist solution to climate change

    The feminist solution to climate change

    Women and girls are more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change than men. But with the right resources, could women and girls actually be a solution to climate change?

    On this week's episode of Sky News ClimateCast, hosts Anna Jones and Katerina Vittozzi explore the role education and family planning play in the fight against climate change.

    They meet Harriet Cheelo from Zambia, who has applied her charity-funded education to a career in sustainable farming.

    Plus they hear from Olasimbo Sojinrin from Solar Sister, a business that champions women across Africa and ensures off-grid communities have access to renewable energy.

    But with the cuts in foreign aid, could women's opportunities to play a role in the fight against climate change be at risk? UNFPA share how their programmes will be hit by the UK government's decision to reduce funding for developing countries.

    Hosts: Anna Jones and Katerina Vittozzi
    Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse
    Guests: Matt Jackson, Catherine Boyce, Harriet Cheelo, Angela Baschieri and Olasimbo Sojinrin

    • 24 min
    What do doughnuts and climate change have in common?

    What do doughnuts and climate change have in common?

    The climate crisis disproportionately affects people living in poverty. Thinkers of the 20th Century: step aside. There is a new economic theory which aims to combat both social inequality and climate change – involving doughnuts.

    Kate Raworth’s "Doughnut Economics" model aims to provide a framework that prioritises people and the planet over profit. She argues that 20th century ideas – such as capitalism and communism - are not equipped to deal with our contemporary ecological and financial challenges. Traditionally, Kate argues, policy-makers have made one solution for financial crises, and a different one for the climate crisis.

    The doughnut model brings together all of those solutions when deciding on systems needed for a functioning community, such as housing, food and energy.

    With a celebrity fan base from the Pope to David Attenborough, the doughnut economic theory is being put into practice in Amsterdam. But what does this look like on the ground?

    In this episode host Anna Jones speaks with the architect of the model, Kate Raworth, co-founder of Doughnut Economics Action Lab. She makes the case as to why we should reject traditional structures and embrace the doughnut. Plus, Sky correspondent Helen-Ann Smith joins us in the studio, to help us wrap our heads around what doughnuts and climate change have in common.

    Hosts: Anna Jones & Helen Ann-Smith

    Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse

    Guests: Kate Raworth and Jennifer Drouin

    • 22 min
    Bangladesh: On the climate change frontline

    Bangladesh: On the climate change frontline

    Bangladesh is facing a climate emergency. The low-lying country is a victim of unpredictable floods and cyclones that are destroying homes, schools and entire villages.

    Communities are being forced to migrate to Dhaka, the country's capital, and live in claustrophobic, dirty and dangerous slums.

    On this special episode of Sky News ClimateCast host Katerina Vittozzi joins Anna Jones from the streets of Dhaka to share the eyewitness accounts of the Bangladeshi communities hit by the impacts of climate change. They're joined by climate special envoy Abul Kalam Azad who tells them why action needs to be taken now to prevent other countries suffering the same fate as Bangladesh.

    Plus, the Sky News crew reveal their behind the scenes highlights and challenges of filming in the country during a climate emergency and global pandemic.

    Hosts: Anna Jones & Katerina Vittozzi
    Producer: Emma Rae Woodhouse
    Newsgathering and guest: Michael Blair
    Camera operator and guest: Dean Massey
    Guest: Abul Kalam Azad

    • 31 min
    Air Pollution and Environmental Racism

    Air Pollution and Environmental Racism

    One of last week's news stories really got us thinking.

    Climate Reporter Victoria Seabrook spoke to a researcher who had found that 70% more people died from COVID in areas with high level of pollution than the England average. That percentage is huge. We were stunned that this wasn’t more widely known and could see that the ramifications for environmental justice are huge.

    And this research is also timely -- in April this year, a coroner called for a change in the law, after a little 9 year old girl, Ella Adoo-Kissi-Debrah, who lived on one of the busiest roads in London -- died of air pollution—the first person to have that officially cited on her death certificate. So this week, Victoria and ClimateCast host Sam Washington dig deeper into the causes and effects of air pollution and how it amplifies not only the impact of COVID but social injustice too.

    They started by talking to Destiny Boka Betesa, who, when she’s not studying for her A levels, is lobbying those in power to make changes literally to the air we breathe. She’s one of the co-founders of Choked UP—the campaign group set up after Ella’s death.

    And we speak to David Carlin, programme lead for United Nations Environment Programme on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures and a columnist for Forbes, about the global impact of air pollution which is estimated to kill up to eight million people a year.

    • 24 min
    The New Climate War - A conversation with Dr Michael E. Mann

    The New Climate War - A conversation with Dr Michael E. Mann

    On this special episode of ClimateCast, guest host Samantha Washington is joined by Dr Michael E. Mann, Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Penn State University, in the United States, to discuss his new book The New Climate War.

    Mann is one of the world’s most prominent climate scientists, who first shot to fame in the 1990s when he published possibly the most famous chart in all of climate science - now known as simply the hockey stick graph - which showed how burning fossil fuels and the resulting greenhouse gases, caused global temperatures to rise. Something most of us now take for granted.

    Sky News' Climate reporter Victoria Seabrook also joins Sam in the studio to discuss all of this week's climate headlines, including a damning report published by the Climate Change Committee which said the government is failing to ensure the UK can cope with climate change already happening, how the UK is using renewable energy from Norway which could power over one million British homes using the world's largest undersea electricity cable, and how extreme weather has caused a worrying shortage of chocolate, coffee and wine.

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
38 Ratings

38 Ratings

Pete-0987654321 ,

Ectinct Golden toad

Just love hearing Christiana Figueres, very optimistic climatecast.

Tom.gps ,

Climate crisis?

Issues being discussed are valid yet there is no mention of the impact of eating meat on the climate. Another well funded outlet unwilling to make people feel uncomfortable about their food choices.

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