27 episodes

The Dash Arts podcast takes on big issues through an artistic lens. Hear artists, filmmakers, musicians, theatre makers and more explore the challenges facing society today. In each episode Dash Arts' Artistic Director Josephine Burton hosts conversations delving into movements, legacies and ideas that continue to shape the cultural landscape worldwide.
For more information, videos and podcasts, please head to www.dasharts.org.uk. Dash Arts is a National Portfolio Organisation funded by the Arts Council of England.

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Dash Arts Podcast Dash Arts

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 18 Ratings

The Dash Arts podcast takes on big issues through an artistic lens. Hear artists, filmmakers, musicians, theatre makers and more explore the challenges facing society today. In each episode Dash Arts' Artistic Director Josephine Burton hosts conversations delving into movements, legacies and ideas that continue to shape the cultural landscape worldwide.
For more information, videos and podcasts, please head to www.dasharts.org.uk. Dash Arts is a National Portfolio Organisation funded by the Arts Council of England.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Identity: The Collapse of Yugoslavia

    Identity: The Collapse of Yugoslavia

    In this third episode of The Identity Series, we deepen our investigation into fractured national identity across Europe, through one of its most contemporary and violent examples: the collapse of Yugoslavia and subsequent wars that ripped across the former country.
    Hosted by Josephine Burton, a range of artists and historians discuss the tensions leading up to the collapse and its heartbreaking aftermath. Together, we explore how this shaped the artists born out of it and changed the artistic output of a nation, what Yugoslavia meant to its artists and how that spirit endures today. 
    Speakers include Milena Dragićević Šešić; professor of cultural policy and cultural management and former president of the University of Arts, Belgrade; Alma Ferovic Fazlic, a Bosnian singer and music producer; Maja Milatovic-Ovadia, a theatre director from former Yugoslavia and PhD researcher on devised comedy theatre in the context of post-war reconciliation; and Albanian-born Rigels Hallili, a lecturer in modern history and Balkans culture at Warsaw University's Centre for East European Studies.
    Srebrenica by Fun-Da-Mental FEAT. Alma Ferovic Fazlic

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    • 58 min
    Identity: The Legacy of Empire

    Identity: The Legacy of Empire

    In this second episode of The Identity Series, we delve into the fraught and complex topic of empire, examining the decline and collapse of various empires across Europe, their aftershocks and their impact on the identity of their citizens.
    Speaking to experts and artists from a range of backgrounds, we discuss topics including the legacy of empire, the impact of colonisation, how different cultures and nationalities have shaped British music, and the power of music to shape identity and express displacement.
    Speakers include Sathnam Sanghera, journalist and best-selling author of Empireland: How Imperialism Has Shaped Modern Britain; Lloyd Bradley, one of the UK's leading black music experts and cultural commentators; and Samira Brahmia, a French-Algerian musician.

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    • 41 min
    Identity: Czeslaw Milosz and the Borderlands

    Identity: Czeslaw Milosz and the Borderlands

    In this first episode of The Identity Series, we explore the meaning and power of identity through the fascinating case of Polish-Lithuanian Nobel Prize-winning writer Czeslaw Milosz.
    Born in Lithuania, Milosz survived the Nazi occupation of Poland, became a member of the Polish Foreign Service under the communist regime, and was then exiled for being a strong critic of communism. His famous collection of essays, The Captive Mind, reveals his struggle with his own sense of identity and belonging as an artist under a communist regime and became symbolic of the Baltic-Eastern European cultural, national and geopolitical ‘borderlands’. 
    We also explore other artists who were affected by the shifting of national boundaries during the first decades of the 20th century.
    Speakers include British singer-songwriter Katy Carr, known for her songs about Polish history; Katia Denysova, a researcher on the influence of socio-political factors on Ukrainian art in the early 20th century; Professor Clare Cavanagh, specialist in modern Russian, Polish and Anglo-American poetry and a biographer of Milosz; and Rigels Halili, lecturer in modern history and Balkans culture at Centre for East European Studies at Warsaw University.

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    • 58 min
    Disco and Atomic War (Live)

    Disco and Atomic War (Live)

    In this episode recorded from our online Dash Café in May, we return to the iconic 2009 Estonian documentary Disco and Atomic War and the topic of borders, propaganda and censorship.
    Audiences enjoyed excerpts from the film and conversation from speakers including Estonian TV journalist and Disco and Atomic War co-producer and co-screenwriter Kiur Aarma; Soviet-born British journalist and author Peter Pomerantsev; former ambassador of Finland to Estonia Kirsti Narinen; and political analyst and Counterpoint director Catherine Fieschi.
    Playful and provocative documentary Disco and Atomic War (Winner of Best Documentary at Warsaw International Film Festival) by Jaak Kilmi recounts the Soviet Union's repressive grip of Estonia in the 80s. Much of Soviet power derived from its ability to censor cultural life. Rock and roll was but a rumour and the only television shows on the air were dreary propaganda – until one day, a few miles across the border in Finland, a huge television antenna was built broadcasting Western signals into the heart of Tallinn, the Estonian capital.
    With thanks to the Embassy of Estonia in London and the Finnish Institute in the UK and Ireland for their support of the live event featured in this episode. Part of Dash Arts' EUTOPIA series, investigating what it means to be European.

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    • 49 min
    Breaking Silence: Censorship and Self-Censorship

    Breaking Silence: Censorship and Self-Censorship

    The fourth and final episode of our podcast mini-series, Breaking Silence, explores issues of censorship, self-censorship and cancel culture in the creation of art.
    Artistic Director Josephine Burton speaks to arts consultant Manick Govinda, who co-founded Brexit Creatives, about what he sees as the art world's censorship or 'cancelling' of pro-Brexit views; Jackie Blackman, author of Beckett and Ethics, on Samuel Beckett's use of silence in his plays as a form of self-censorship; journalist Mayssa Issa, about the silencing of artists during the coronavirus pandemic with arts being considered 'non-essential'; and Turkey's 'standing man' Erdem Gündüz, whose 2013 silent protest against the Turkish government went viral.
    Through conversations with a range of acclaimed speakers across a range of disciplines, Breaking Silence explores ways in which voices, stories and cultures have been silenced both in current times and recent history, when silence can be a positive force for change, and what role the arts can play in breaking silences.
    Links
    Watch the music video for Danser Encore: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyBEMRyt6Qg
    Buy Beckett and Ethics: https://uk.bookshop.org/books/1605839840_beckett-and-ethics/9781441151179 
    Find out more about Brexit Creatives on their Twitter @brexitcreatives
    Photo credit
    Erdem Gündüz, standing in Istanbul's Taksim Square in June 2013 as a silent protest against the Turkish government.


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    • 43 min
    Breaking Silence: Across Borders

    Breaking Silence: Across Borders

    The third episode of our podcast mini-series, Breaking Silence, looks at the silencing of cultural identity across national, ethnic and religious borders and ways in which international artists are unearthing these issues in their work.
    Artistic Director Josephine Burton speaks to theatre-maker Krzysztof Czyzewski, whose Borderlands project aims to revive the multicultural heritage of Poland’s Sejny region in the aftermath of war; Kurdish singer Nawroz Oranari, who was forced to flee his homeland of Iraq for his politically-charged music and eventually seek asylum in Europe; and theatre director Athina Kasiou about the Cypriot endeavour to claim authorship of its own identity and how her work and that of her fellow artists navigates this.
    Through conversations with a range of acclaimed speakers across a range of disciplines, Breaking Silence explores ways in which voices, stories and cultures have been silenced both in current times and recent history, when silence can be a positive force for change, and what role the arts can play in breaking silences.
    Links
    Citizens of the Word Choir: https://www.citizensoftheworldchoir.org/ 
    Photo credit
    Cast members in Borderland Foundation's 2008 production The Sejny Chronicles at La MaMa Experimental Theater Club in New York as part of the Borderlanders: Finding Their Voice festival. Photography by Jonathan Slaff.


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    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
18 Ratings

18 Ratings

AEW 2021 ,

Thought provoking and powerful

Very much enjoying this Silence series of podcasts. Excellently curated covering topics that are both thought provoking and powerful.

p-fossill ,

Second hand memory

A really powerful podcast on second hand memory and transference of trauma. Relevant, insightful, important.

srhlck ,

Great series of podcasts on art and history - a delight

Highly recommend

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