67 episodes

Published quarterly, the purpose of Evidence-Based Nursing is to select from the health-related literature research studies and reviews that report important advances relevant to best nursing practice. The clinical relevance and rigour of the studies are assessed to identify research that is relevant to nursing. A commentary on chosen articles identifies the key findings and implications for clinical practice. The RCNi and the BMJ publish Evidence-Based Nursing under the editorship of Professor Alison Twycross from London South Bank University, UK. * The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

EBN podcast BMJ Group

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Published quarterly, the purpose of Evidence-Based Nursing is to select from the health-related literature research studies and reviews that report important advances relevant to best nursing practice. The clinical relevance and rigour of the studies are assessed to identify research that is relevant to nursing. A commentary on chosen articles identifies the key findings and implications for clinical practice. The RCNi and the BMJ publish Evidence-Based Nursing under the editorship of Professor Alison Twycross from London South Bank University, UK. * The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

    Blood pressure’s threshold in pregnancy, when less is more for mother and baby

    Blood pressure’s threshold in pregnancy, when less is more for mother and baby

    In this podcast, Associate Editor of Evidence-Based Nursing, Lisa Kidd, talks to Laura Austin, who's a Registered Nurse/Midwife working in the Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, Australia, and the author of a commentary on original, unpublished research based out of Melbourne. The aim of the research was to determine whether, within Australia, classification of hypertension within pregnancy should be adjusted to reflect the American College of Cardiology’s recent amendment to their guidelines.
    Read the commentary on the EBN’s website: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2020/08/24/ebnurs-2020-103274
    Commentary on: Reddy M, Rolnik DL, Harris K, et al. Challenging the definition of hypertension in pregnancy: a retrospective cohort study. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2020, Jan 16. doi:10.1016/j.ajog.2019.12.272. [Epub ahead of print].

    • 9 min
    Care for patients with hospital-onset sepsis

    Care for patients with hospital-onset sepsis

    In this podcast, Associate Editor of EBN, David Barrett (University of Hull, UK), talks to Dr Aneesh Basheer (Departments of General Medicine and Medical Education, Pondicherry Institute of Medical Sciences, India) about sepsis bundles.
    They discuss a commentary titled “Patients with hospital-onset sepsis are less likely to receive sepsis bundle care than those with community-onset sepsis”, recently published by EBN - https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2020/06/01/ebnurs-2020-103285
    The commentary relates to Baghdadi JD, Wong MD, Uslan DZ et al. Adherence to the SEP-1 Sepsis Bundle in Hospital-Onset v. Community-Onset Sepsis: a Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study. J Gen Intern Med 2020; Feb 10. doi: 10.1007/s11606-020-05653-0. [Epub ahead of print]

    • 11 min
    Palliative dementia care to people living at home - what do we know?

    Palliative dementia care to people living at home - what do we know?

    The European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) domains provide a useful framework for guiding palliative dementia care for those living and dying at home. However, research is required to better understand how to design and implement palliative dementia care interventions for people living at home
    Listen to the conversation on this topic between Associate Editor of Evidence-Based Nursing Laura Green and Nuriye Kupeli (Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Department, University College London, UK) and read the commentary - https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2019/09/18/ebnurs-2019-103160.
    Commentary on: Miranda R, Bunn F, Lynch J, et al. Palliative care for people with dementia living at home: a systematic review of interventions. Palliat Med 2019;33:726-742. doi:10.1177/0269216319847092. Epub 2019 May 6.

    • 15 min
    Research Made Simple: care of men living with dementia

    Research Made Simple: care of men living with dementia

    Welcome to a new series of "research made simple" podcasts where researchers are interviewed about their studies and chosen methods, and implications for nursing practice and research are considered.
    In this first podcast, Associate Editor of EBN Laura Green speaks to Dr Sarah Campbell, a researcher within the Dementia and Ageing Research team in the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work at the University of Manchester. Her doctoral research "Atmospheres of Dementia Care: Stories told through the bodies of men" is an ethnographic study exploring what role the experience of place plays, and the role gender has, in the lives of men living with dementia in a variety of care settings. The aim was to interpret the everyday embodied life for men living with dementia in care and their connection to atmosphere. The study was undertaken alongside a wider project colloquially known as The Hair and Care Project (ESRC Ref. 2011-2013; Dr Richard Ward, PI). The PhD study collected data across three fieldsites focusing on the experience of seven men living with dementia.
    To find out more about this research, contact Sarah on sarah.campbell@manchester.ac.uk or follow her on twitter @wanderingalong
    You can also read a few relevant articles in Evidence-Based Nursing about ethnography as a research method and its applicability to understanding nursing practice:
    Ethnography: Challenges and Opportunities https://ebn.bmj.com/content/20/4/98
    Using observational research to to obtain a picture of nursing practice https://ebn.bmj.com/content/19/3/66

    • 15 min
    Proactive nurses in family decisions in the intensive care unit

    Proactive nurses in family decisions in the intensive care unit

    The communication between nurses and families during and after family decision meetings is discussed in this podcast.
    Roberta Heale talks to Dr Mohammad Khan, Community Medicine, School of Dental Science, Universiti Sains Malaysia about his commentary published by Evidence-Based Nursing (https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2019/09/10/ebnurs-2019-103089).
    The commentary relates to the paper: Pecanac K, King B. Nurse-Family Communication During and After Family Meetings in the Intensive Care Unit. J Nurs Scholarsh 2019;51:129–37

    • 7 min
    Why everyday interactions should be visible: the brilliance study about home-based palliative care

    Why everyday interactions should be visible: the brilliance study about home-based palliative care

    “Given the complexities of home-based palliative care, along with recent developments in patient safety, the time is ripe to better understand the characteristics that contribute to ‘pockets of excellence’ (brilliance) in home-based palliative care.”
    This podcast discusses a commentary recently published by EBN on “What does it take to deliver brilliant home-based palliative care? Using positiveorganisational scholarship and video reflexive ethnography to explore the complexities of palliative care at home.” Palliat Med 2018:269216318807835. doi: 10.1177/0269216318807835.
    Read the commentary: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/early/2019/04/11/ebnurs-2019-103070

    • 18 min

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